Frances Darlington Lamberti (1925–2016)

May 25, 2017

A rainy day at Arlington National Cemetery, 25 May 2017

Major Frances Darlington Lamberti, USAF was laid to rest in Section 12, Grave 5289.

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I have attended a number of funerals over the years. I have been to Arlington National Cemetery a number of times over the years, for various reasons. My family and I buried Americus Lamberti (1917 – 2012), 2nd Lt, US Army, in 2013. This one was very different.

Because she was a Major, we had a Band, Escort, Caisson, Body Burial Team (6), Firing Party, and a Bugler. I am sure that my Aunt probably didn’t want all of this, but the United States Air Force honors their members.

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There was a light rain when we started. The transfer from the car to the Caisson was our first stop.

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The band was near by as the transfer was made.

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In boot camp, I was in the US Coast Guard Band at Cape May, New Jersey, so I know what being in the band, playing in the rain is like, but certainly not at this sacred place.

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Beautiful animals.

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Stop number 2. Transfer from the Caisson to the burial team for the burial. (note, the rain had stopped)

Lt Col John L Elliott Jr. Chaplain, USAF was the Chaplain for the service. The service was probably the way Aunt Fran would have wanted it. Short and to the point, with full honors. (sorry, no pictures)

We then took the remains to the burial plot, to put her with my Uncle Max, and her twin sons, Dwight Strode Lamberti, and Mark Darlington Lamberti (31 Jan 1967).

A special Thank You to Mary, our Arlington National Cemetery Representative who took all of the stress out of the day. We knew exactly what we needed to do, where and when.

And to Jean Anderegg, our Arlington Lady, representing the US Air Force.

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There is a “rest of the story” here.

When I was much younger, and a Boy Scout, we learned how to fold the American Flag, I remember teaching younger scouts how to fold the Flag. That helped when I was in the Coast Guard, I have folded a couple of flags, but not the way it’s done in Arlington.

When I arrived, Mary took my Aunt’s Flag because she had to “refold it” the way the Air Force Burial Team wanted the flag folded. Interesting.

When Colonel Elliott greeted us, I asked about that. What I learned was that each Service has their own unique ceremony and flag folding routine. I did not know that.

This experience was very different for the other funerals and events I have had at Arlington. I have seen the bands and caissons before, but being 1/2 a car length behind the Burial Team is very different.

It was a honor for me, to be part of this ceremony to Honor my Aunt Fran (Frances), my mothers sister, with full United States Air Force Honors.

Thank you for your service. You are with your family in Our Nation’s Most Hallowed Ground.

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With a little help from our friends

March 16, 2016

The  other night, I was finishing getting caught up on Facebook when I cam across of post card image. it was posted by Genea-Blogger Becky Jamison.  Her Blog Grace and Glory is one to follow. I have the honor and pleasure of meeting Becky and her husband Larry at Roots Tech.

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Her Facebook post was about images from Kansas towns. The one that was posted was an old one. Since my Grandfather and his family were from there in the mid to late 1800’s I had to look.

Images of Kansas Towns and Cities

I just had to look. I have been focusing my research on a 5 generation file that I am working and blogging about for DearMYRLTE’s FINALLY Get Organized! project.

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I had just found my Great Uncle in a census record in Manhattan, Kansas. The address was right near the Kansas State College, now University. I knew he went to school there so I followed that Bright Shiny Object (BSO) and looked around the campus, specifically the Veterinary Medicine part of the campus, because that is where he went to school.

A long night,  long story short, I sent an email to the email address on their website, asking for any information they might have on my Great Uncle.

Four hours later I received an email with a 7 page article that had been written about his life and his story. What I received was a marked up copy of the article, so I don’t have any way to cite the article, but I want to thank Colonel Dr. Howard H. Erickson, PhD for that wonderful telling of my Great Uncle’s life.

Most of the information in the article is known to me, but there were details that I didn’t know about.

I have written about Colonel Josiah Wistar Worthington before, and have tried to share what I know of his story. I have found his World War I and World War II Draft Registration cards.

As the article clearly states, my Great Uncle was not assigned to where the “War” was happening, as he joined the Army at the beginning of the war but had a comment that there must be more to come for him, and his military service. And there was.

The article also put into perspective the cost for the education at that time and place. One item, of many, said that it cost “$5.00 for a commencement fee”

There was an answer to one of those BSO questions that I have had, but didn’t have it on my ToDo list, was to understand WHY I found a Bureau of Land Management record for him when I visited the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) a couple of years ago. This article put him in the right place at the right time for my Great Uncle to go after land in 1912.

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Thank you Becky for sharing that BSO.


War of 1812

November 10, 2014

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With the way I have changed my research habits, I have found four (4) people in my family file who were involved with the War of 1812.

Name Unit Relationship to me
Daniel Runyon 3 REG’T (SEWARD’S) NEW JERSEY MILITIA Father-in-law of 3rd cousin 4x removed
Nathan Holloway 45 REG’T (PEYTON’S) VIRGINIA MILITIA 3rd great uncle of wife of 1st great uncle
Russell Loomis SHEPARD’S REG’T, CONNECTICUT STATE TROOPS 2nd great grandfather of wife of 1st great uncle
Isaac Darlington 2 REG’T l INF (BACHE’S) PENNSYLVANIA MIL Uncle of husband of 2nd cousin 3x removed

Daniel Runyon and I connect, way back to Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701), paternal line. Daniel’s wife was a descendant of John Worthington Jr, the oldest son of Capt John and Sarah Howard Worthington.

Nathan Holloway and I connect with my great grandparents, paternal line, down from my Grandfather.

Russell Loomis and I connect, again, with my great grandparents. This time with my grandfather’s younger brother.

Isaac Darlington and I connect with my maternal line back 5 generations.

OK, we aren’t close, but now I should be looking for those War of 1812 Pension Files.

Please visit this website:

http://www.preservethepensions.org/

As I post this, there are 1,336,450 Images Preserved and 37.52% of the funding needed to complete this project.

Donate to War of 1812

 

 


Preparation for Veterans Day

November 7, 2014

For a little over a week now, I have focusing my research on Military Records, seeing which individuals have military records. My research is based on shaky leaf hints that appear in my Ancestry Member Tree and in Family Tree Maker program. I have blogged about this process on my Family Tree Maker Blog

I thought I would share some numbers so far, as the result of this research should provide me with blog material. Not that I need some material, just want to focus on those who served our county.

At the moment, I have 362 Shaky Leaf Hints to follow in 22 Record Groups on Ancestry.com. I have completed 105 Citations based on my work to date.

For example, I just finished looking at 11 Sons of the American Revolutionary War Application files (SAR). With those 11 Records, I recorded 577 Facts and have 25 media files (digital images of those applications). That is a lot of information and time consuming. I only have 297 more hints in that record group to go. (much later)

But I am focusing on 14 specific record groups with hints, about 83 hints. Those are the ones I hope to finish before Tuesday.

I have changed my research routine, go look at specific record hint. I have found that the work goes much quicker when I am working with one record group at a time. I know what to look for, what information I want to capture, how this information is to be Cited, and have added a Research Log for each person who I find in these record groups.

I don’t have to remember what to look for, how did I do that, so I can focus on the information that these records provide.

I have a couple of candidates that I will run though the Evidentia program to help resolve some conflicting information. Yes, I’ll do a blog post HERE when I do that.

Didn’t realize, how many people in my file have Military Records and some of them are very interesting.


DearMYRTLE’s DocuChallenge

November 2, 2014
DocuChallenge: Phillips, William D

We were presented with an image from Fold3.com to do the following:

NOW FOR THE CHALLENGE
Let’s answer these questions:

  1. What is this document?
  2. How would you describe the physical appearance of this document?
  3. What does this document say about Ol’ Myrt’s ancestor?
  4. What other people are mentioned in this document?
  5. What information items do you find most reliable in this document?
  6. What information items do you find less reliable in this document?
  7. What value is this document without a citation indicating provenance?
  8. Can you craft a citation for this document?
  9. What would you do with this digital document?
  10. What other record groups should Ol’ Myrt consider after analyzing this document?

This is a Civil War Pension card. We are looking at a digital image of that card.

I transcribed it:

Dead
Name of Soldier: Phillips, William H
Service: Last Rank P, Co K, 19 Reg, Ind Inf
Term of Service: Enlisted [ no date ] Discharged [ no date ]
Date of Filing 1880 June 7
Class: Invalid, Application number 376,996, Certificate No 243,464

Date of Filing 1921 Mar 12
Widow 1,171,114, 8-1-20, 907389

Additional Service A 17 V.R.C.
Died Fed 21 1921, Knoxville, Iowa

“Civil War Pensions; Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900”, digital image, The National Archives (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 31 October 2014); entry for William H Phillips (Co K, 19 Reg, Ind Inf); citing: Civil War Pensions, Pension applications for service in the US Army between 1861 and 1900, grouped according to the units in which the veterans served; NARA T289. no roll number cited.

The first thing I noticed was William H vs William D. Wonder if +DearMYRTLE gave that to us as a hint.

The Soldier, William H Phillips had died:

What this told me was the soldier’s name was William H Phillips and that he was married and left a widow. He was a Private, in Company K, of the 19th Regiment, Indiana Infantry. He Died 1/21/1921 in Knoxville, Iowa, and his widow filed for the pension 3/12/1921.

So far, the information appears to be OK, but….

One thing that caught my eye was the Term of Service, there we no dates. So, I searched to see if there were any Civil War Service Records for William H Phillips that fit the information I had so far.

There was no indication in the Civil War Service Index – Union – Indiana for him, but there were 7 entries, none this William H. The question so far is, Did he serve and when did he serve? Not sure what the A 17 V.R.C. means, yet.

I have been looking at Civil War Records on Ancestry.com, and where I would normally go from what I have so far, would see IF I can find HER pension file. And I found her pension at: U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 for William H Phillips. The numbers matched exactly, as I have seen before. It’s a different card, but should have the same numbers and certificate number. It did. The widow’s name is Louisa Phillips. She filed for the pension in Iowa, where he had died.

That A 17 V.R.C. is also on this pension record. Two documents with the same information.

My next stop was to see IF I could find any more information on the 19th Indiana Infantry Regiment, as I had a hint something was coming. So I went to Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/19th_Indiana_Infantry_Regiment

Having been on a brief Civil War research trip with our spouses, I took this picture at Gettysburg in May.

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The Iron Brigade. I knew there had to be a connection. BUT, I took my next step to see what else I could find out about the 19th.

Before I take my next step in research, I need to mention that the Iron Brigade was involved, in Gettysburg, on Culp’s Hill on 3 July. I also had a Confederate soldier, Ridgely Howard, in that SAME battle and he was wounded in the thigh at Culps Hill. Not in the same part of the battle, DearMYRTLE’s soldier was at the other end of that battle, as there are monuments placed where the units were fighting. Pieces of David Ridgely Howard’s story is in a PBS film on Gettysburg.

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This is the monument for the 1st Maryland.

Back to my research I found this website:

http://www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/unininf2.htm#19th

The kicker for this research, for this DocuChallenge is in the LAST Line on the 19th’s service information:

Weldon R. R. August 18-21”

In William Henry Phillips Find-A-Grave memorial, Find A Greave Memorial #58768920, DearMYRTLE published the details of his pension files, that he served through 1864. So, Was HE, William Henry Phillips, at Weldron R.R. in that battle?

MY Ridgely Howard was wounded for the 2nd time at THAT battle. This time, “wounded in action – upper portion of right thigh, amputated.

David Ridgely Howard lived until 23 December 1927 and is buried in Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland.

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Civil War–150 Years Later and Ridgely Howard

July 3, 2013

My cousin, Dear MYRTLE, made a comment on Facebook about the Civil War and that she and Mr. Myrt were watching a program on Gettysburg. Last night, I found a link to a program on Gettysburg online, so I decided to watch this 88 minute program.

http://www.history.com/shows/gettysburg/videos/gettysburg?m=5189717d404

What I didn’t realize, until about 50 minutes into this program, that I had seen this program before. I knew that I had from how the program was done, but didn’t connect the dots as to what this program was about.

“Ridgely Howard” was mentioned, as a 33 year old, slave holder from Baltimore and that his grandfather served with George Washington during the War of Revolution, and that this family was of the “plantation class”. I know this guy. I spend a summer researching Ridgely Howard trying to find out who he was.

I did a series of blog posts on my search for Ridgely Howard:

https://worthy2be.wordpress.com/tag/2nd-life/

There may be a couple of blog posts in that series that is not about this research, but about the 3rd blog post is the end, at that time, of my search.

It turns out that David Ridgely Howard (1844 – 1927) was my 5th cousin, 4 times removed.

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I was reminded about James Wallace, whose grandfather served in the same regiment as did Ridgely Howards grandfather with George Washington.

What I didn’t catch the first time, was that David Ridgely Howards house has been reported to be haunted. I’ll have to look into that.

After Ridgely was wounded, on this day, in the morning of 3 July 1863, he would return and be wounded a second time, but this time he lost a leg. The amazing thing is that he lived until 1927.

 

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Robert J Driver Jr, First & Second Maryland C.S.A. (Bowie, Maryland:  Heritage Books, Inc, 2003), page 205 – Capt. James McHenry Howard (left), 1st Maryland Infantry, and his brother David Ridgely Howard, Co A, 2nd Maryland Infantry, were photographed in Canada in their Confederate uniform at at the war’s end. David has a metal “cross button” pinned to his breast, which is believed to have been the insignia of the Maryland Line (see Plate H2, Dave Mark Collection).  H. R. Worthington – Book Shelf


Revolutionary Challenge

March 7, 2013

In support of the Photo Detective, Maureen Taylor, and Verissima Productions, and the Legal Genealogist, Judy Russell, I would like to make you aware of this project, a film called Revolutionary Voices. As an introduction to the project, I ask that you visit Judy’s Blog, A Revolutionary challenge. There is more information about this project, including a short video by Maureen Taylor, and other details.

Kickstarter.com posted this update, so that you can see what has happened since March 1, 2013.

I have made a contribution to this very worthwhile project. Please note, that you too can join in by making a submission as noted below on your Revolutionary War connection.

Thank you.

 

Project Update #2: Week One Wrap-Up

Posted by Maureen Taylor & Verissima ProductionsLike

What a whirlwind week it’s been! We couldn’t be happier with the $11,266.00 in pledges we have so far. Don’t forget, we don’t get any of the money pledged until we’ve reached our full goal, so there’s still lots of work to do!

We had an amazing response to Judy Russell’s “Revolutionary Challenge” posted to her Legal Genealogist blog last week (http://www.legalgenealogist.com/blog/2013/03/02/my-own-last-muster/) as well as a great outpouring of support from social media and our direct email appeals.

But now the challenge really begins – many Kickstarter campaigns lose momentum after week one… let’s make sure to keep our pace strong! A second $10,000+ week would make a huge impact on the potential success of our campaign and our film. Here are two quick steps to help us make that a reality: 

1. Keep sharing – (so far, about 50% of our donors have come from sharing and social media efforts (http://infogr.am/The-Profile-of-a-Donor/). Please blog about us, tweet about us, write down the link and hand it out at your next historical society meeting– any and all kinds of networking will help us reach and surpass our goal! 

2. Tell your own Revolutionary Story. Do you have family ties to the revolutionary war? Are you a history buff with a great story or factoid? Do you own an artifact or photo that has a Revolutionary connection? Let us know! Anyone who has pledged to the campaign so far can send us a Kickstarter message or email (lastmusterfilm@gmail.com) that’s 1-3 sentences telling us about your ties to the Revolution. We’ll use Twitter & Facebook to highlight it as thanks for partnering with us to help make this campaign a success. Here’s your chance to show how far the roots of the Revolution spread! 

Thanks again for all of your financial and networking support! 

With Appreciation, 

The Revolutionary Voices team 

Fun Fact: Molly Ferris Akin’s story of bravery during the Revolution was oral history passed down in the family until a descendant wrote in down in 1984. You can start telling your own story now!


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