Ships Log Book–On This Day

July 29, 2019

Some time ago, actually 24 October 2018, I wrote a Blog on this topic

Ships Log Book – Online

I was reminded that on this day, 29 July 1967 the Navy had a very serious event on the USS Forrestal (CV-59) had a disaster, her flight deck had a fire that killed 134 sailors and 161 were injured.

There is a YouTube video about that event. As I watched it, it reminded me of the “other side of the story”.  Trial by Fire: A Carrier Fights For Life (1973)

Because I know that the USCGC Halfmoon’s log book was online, I went back to look to see if July 1967 was there yet. Sorry to say, it was not. BUT a number of other Month’s of Log Books are. I’ll go back later to read them.

https://catalog.archives.gov/id/83869328

I remember this day, and was hoping to confirm or disprove my memory, with the log book but, maybe later.

Underway Replenishment at Sea (UNREP) was “normal” operation, where the Halfmoon would pull along side some very large Navy Ship and take on “stores”, food, fuel, ammunition, Movies and Mail, and some times people. Then we would move in, closer to shore, and to an UNREP with smaller Navy and Coast Guard vessels and give them what they needed.

On the night of 29 July 1967, we were involved with an UNREP but by helicopter. They would drop “stores” on our deck and move back and return with another load of “stores”. BUT, they stopped. We would learn that these helicopters would be needed to the North of us (as I recall), then we would learn of this accident.

This picture is the Halfmoon (with our Commanding Officer, Commander E.G. McCarthy on the left) as we wait our turn to pull along side of the ship with the goodies.

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Taking on Stores

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And we replenish the USCGC Point Cypress in this photo..

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The things you remember, based on other events. That YouTube video was from a Coast Guard Email List.

LESSON LEARNED: Go Back and look at those Sources you already have in your Database. There are 5 or 6 new Ship Log Books that were not on line earlier


USCGC Halfmoon (WHEC-378) and the Lobster Wars

November 17, 2018
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This is one of my Coast Guard pictures that I took, while aboard the USCGC Halfmoon. We were on patrol in the Florida Straits this January 1967 as we would be on our way to GITMO to play games with the Navy.

I had just come “on watch”, 12 Jan 1967, when I heard “May-Day, May-Day” with words we would hear today, “shots fired”.

The photo I took that morning as one of our Life Boards, with a “boarding party” escorted the Bahama Mama to our port side for further investigation. Later in the day, the FBI and others would be arrive and we all would head into Miami.

I bring this up today, as I just found the Newspaper article that talks about this event.

Star-Gazette, 12 Jan 1967, Thu, Other Editions, Page 3 — Newspaper.com.

I remember the when we got home, my mother had a newspaper article, from her local newspaper, pinned to the Map she had with my adventures on the Halfmoon. She also mentioned that we were on the Philadelphia TV Station news for that day.

Have found several other articles while searching through the Newspaper.com website about the family.


Ships Log Book – Online

October 24, 2018

Today, October 24, 2018, the Nation Archives is holding a National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair.

On 15 August 2018 DearMYRTLE and a Wacky Wednesday featuring Jennifer Holik who discussed US MILITARY: MORNING REPORTS. Here a link to that webinar.

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0aBwuPvhT1imR3lv8e0OTA

During the show, I looked to see if the US Coast Guard Cutter Halfmoon was listed anywhere or had any Ships Log books. I did not find any.

I thought that I would look, again, to see if there were any. This time I searched differently, after browsing for a few minutes, and realized that the Archives used USCG (Coast Guard) and I think I used USCGC (Coast Guard Cutter) in my earlier search. And I found the ship’s log books for 05/1967 and 06/1967, while we were in Vietnam.

My name is on two pages, where I spent the night on a swift boat going up one of the rivers, and the previous month one of my bosses was listed as well. Another boss, was listed several times doing Shore Patrol. — I have written proof that I was in Vietnam.

I know when this picture was taken, because I was returning from that night on a swift boat, like the one in the picture.

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The log entry for leaving

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and returning

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What was interesting and may be important to others, our ship has been on and off of the “Agent Orange” list several times. I had a ship mate ask me several years ago if I had pictures, which I did. But this Log Book has names, ranks, and serial numbers and that we were in Vietnam

In a Facebook posting, That ship mate responded to my post there, letting me know that he in fact was drawing 100% Permanent & Total due to Agent Orange and that another ship mate was in the same position as he, and that we lost another ship mate due to complications of diabetes.

The ship is back on the Agent Orange List, but if one had to prove that they were on the ship at the time, this Log Book would help document that they were on board.

I read both month’s log books, all very interesting, and have sent FB Messages to several of my ship mates to let them know that they are ONLINE.

Thank you National Archives for making these Ships Logs available to us.

https://catalog.archives.gov/id/83869328

— Happy Family History Month


Frances Darlington Lamberti (1925–2016)

May 25, 2017

A rainy day at Arlington National Cemetery, 25 May 2017

Major Frances Darlington Lamberti, USAF was laid to rest in Section 12, Grave 5289.

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I have attended a number of funerals over the years. I have been to Arlington National Cemetery a number of times over the years, for various reasons. My family and I buried Americus Lamberti (1917 – 2012), 2nd Lt, US Army, in 2013. This one was very different.

Because she was a Major, we had a Band, Escort, Caisson, Body Burial Team (6), Firing Party, and a Bugler. I am sure that my Aunt probably didn’t want all of this, but the United States Air Force honors their members.

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There was a light rain when we started. The transfer from the car to the Caisson was our first stop.

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The band was near by as the transfer was made.

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In boot camp, I was in the US Coast Guard Band at Cape May, New Jersey, so I know what being in the band, playing in the rain is like, but certainly not at this sacred place.

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Beautiful animals.

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Stop number 2. Transfer from the Caisson to the burial team for the burial. (note, the rain had stopped)

Lt Col John L Elliott Jr. Chaplain, USAF was the Chaplain for the service. The service was probably the way Aunt Fran would have wanted it. Short and to the point, with full honors. (sorry, no pictures)

We then took the remains to the burial plot, to put her with my Uncle Max, and her twin sons, Dwight Strode Lamberti, and Mark Darlington Lamberti (31 Jan 1967).

A special Thank You to Mary, our Arlington National Cemetery Representative who took all of the stress out of the day. We knew exactly what we needed to do, where and when.

And to Jean Anderegg, our Arlington Lady, representing the US Air Force.

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There is a “rest of the story” here.

When I was much younger, and a Boy Scout, we learned how to fold the American Flag, I remember teaching younger scouts how to fold the Flag. That helped when I was in the Coast Guard, I have folded a couple of flags, but not the way it’s done in Arlington.

When I arrived, Mary took my Aunt’s Flag because she had to “refold it” the way the Air Force Burial Team wanted the flag folded. Interesting.

When Colonel Elliott greeted us, I asked about that. What I learned was that each Service has their own unique ceremony and flag folding routine. I did not know that.

This experience was very different for the other funerals and events I have had at Arlington. I have seen the bands and caissons before, but being 1/2 a car length behind the Burial Team is very different.

It was a honor for me, to be part of this ceremony to Honor my Aunt Fran (Frances), my mothers sister, with full United States Air Force Honors.

Thank you for your service. You are with your family in Our Nation’s Most Hallowed Ground.


With a little help from our friends

March 16, 2016

The  other night, I was finishing getting caught up on Facebook when I cam across of post card image. it was posted by Genea-Blogger Becky Jamison.  Her Blog Grace and Glory is one to follow. I have the honor and pleasure of meeting Becky and her husband Larry at Roots Tech.

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Her Facebook post was about images from Kansas towns. The one that was posted was an old one. Since my Grandfather and his family were from there in the mid to late 1800’s I had to look.

Images of Kansas Towns and Cities

I just had to look. I have been focusing my research on a 5 generation file that I am working and blogging about for DearMYRLTE’s FINALLY Get Organized! project.

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I had just found my Great Uncle in a census record in Manhattan, Kansas. The address was right near the Kansas State College, now University. I knew he went to school there so I followed that Bright Shiny Object (BSO) and looked around the campus, specifically the Veterinary Medicine part of the campus, because that is where he went to school.

A long night,  long story short, I sent an email to the email address on their website, asking for any information they might have on my Great Uncle.

Four hours later I received an email with a 7 page article that had been written about his life and his story. What I received was a marked up copy of the article, so I don’t have any way to cite the article, but I want to thank Colonel Dr. Howard H. Erickson, PhD for that wonderful telling of my Great Uncle’s life.

Most of the information in the article is known to me, but there were details that I didn’t know about.

I have written about Colonel Josiah Wistar Worthington before, and have tried to share what I know of his story. I have found his World War I and World War II Draft Registration cards.

As the article clearly states, my Great Uncle was not assigned to where the “War” was happening, as he joined the Army at the beginning of the war but had a comment that there must be more to come for him, and his military service. And there was.

The article also put into perspective the cost for the education at that time and place. One item, of many, said that it cost “$5.00 for a commencement fee”

There was an answer to one of those BSO questions that I have had, but didn’t have it on my ToDo list, was to understand WHY I found a Bureau of Land Management record for him when I visited the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) a couple of years ago. This article put him in the right place at the right time for my Great Uncle to go after land in 1912.

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Thank you Becky for sharing that BSO.


War of 1812

November 10, 2014

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With the way I have changed my research habits, I have found four (4) people in my family file who were involved with the War of 1812.

Name Unit Relationship to me
Daniel Runyon 3 REG’T (SEWARD’S) NEW JERSEY MILITIA Father-in-law of 3rd cousin 4x removed
Nathan Holloway 45 REG’T (PEYTON’S) VIRGINIA MILITIA 3rd great uncle of wife of 1st great uncle
Russell Loomis SHEPARD’S REG’T, CONNECTICUT STATE TROOPS 2nd great grandfather of wife of 1st great uncle
Isaac Darlington 2 REG’T l INF (BACHE’S) PENNSYLVANIA MIL Uncle of husband of 2nd cousin 3x removed

Daniel Runyon and I connect, way back to Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701), paternal line. Daniel’s wife was a descendant of John Worthington Jr, the oldest son of Capt John and Sarah Howard Worthington.

Nathan Holloway and I connect with my great grandparents, paternal line, down from my Grandfather.

Russell Loomis and I connect, again, with my great grandparents. This time with my grandfather’s younger brother.

Isaac Darlington and I connect with my maternal line back 5 generations.

OK, we aren’t close, but now I should be looking for those War of 1812 Pension Files.

Please visit this website:

http://www.preservethepensions.org/

As I post this, there are 1,336,450 Images Preserved and 37.52% of the funding needed to complete this project.

Donate to War of 1812

 

 


Preparation for Veterans Day

November 7, 2014

For a little over a week now, I have focusing my research on Military Records, seeing which individuals have military records. My research is based on shaky leaf hints that appear in my Ancestry Member Tree and in Family Tree Maker program. I have blogged about this process on my Family Tree Maker Blog

I thought I would share some numbers so far, as the result of this research should provide me with blog material. Not that I need some material, just want to focus on those who served our county.

At the moment, I have 362 Shaky Leaf Hints to follow in 22 Record Groups on Ancestry.com. I have completed 105 Citations based on my work to date.

For example, I just finished looking at 11 Sons of the American Revolutionary War Application files (SAR). With those 11 Records, I recorded 577 Facts and have 25 media files (digital images of those applications). That is a lot of information and time consuming. I only have 297 more hints in that record group to go. (much later)

But I am focusing on 14 specific record groups with hints, about 83 hints. Those are the ones I hope to finish before Tuesday.

I have changed my research routine, go look at specific record hint. I have found that the work goes much quicker when I am working with one record group at a time. I know what to look for, what information I want to capture, how this information is to be Cited, and have added a Research Log for each person who I find in these record groups.

I don’t have to remember what to look for, how did I do that, so I can focus on the information that these records provide.

I have a couple of candidates that I will run though the Evidentia program to help resolve some conflicting information. Yes, I’ll do a blog post HERE when I do that.

Didn’t realize, how many people in my file have Military Records and some of them are very interesting.


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