Maryland, Wills and Probate Records–Capt John

September 2, 2015

Just spent the last hour looking at a new record on Ancestry.com

Worthington_John-LastWill

I believe this is the Last Will for Capt. John Worthington (1650 – 1701). It will take a while to transcribe it, but I am certain that it is him.

This document was created in 1699 and it had all of the right children, known at that point, references to other extended members indicating property Capt. John owned. The plantation, on the Severn River was mentioned,

At first, I wasn’t sure, the way that the information was presented on the screen, but reading (what I could) it’s his.

I had a date in my file for when the will was Proved. The date was the same, the year was not, but I think the information I had may have been in error.

Two children weren’t listed, be that was because they were born after the will was written, one of those children died very young, the second carried the name of that baby, and was Charles from whom I descend.

Yesterday I spent a while trying to make the Pendennis connection, the plantation and the castle, so I see a trip to Annapolis, Maryland in my future. Just not seeing any hint as to why Capt. John would name his plantation Pendennis. But, did HE name it or when what his plantation named. Property had names, which the will pointed out and I have other records of, but why Pendennis. Why would at “young lad”, that is Capt. John have that name linked to him.

The Pendennis Castle was involved in a siege in 1646. King Charles I was the King at the time (trying to confirm that), and there was a John Arundel (1576 – 1654) tied to the castle. Arundel being the county, in Maryland, where Capt. John lived.

Thank you Ancestry.com for this new Record Collection. It should keep me busy for a while.


What’s in a Name ? Pendennis

August 31, 2015

A couple of days ago, I was re-organizing some of my genealogy photographs and was reminded of Pendennis Mount across the Severn River from Annapolis in Maryland. This is the photo that I took, Pendennis Mount on the Severn.

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It is the name of the plantation that Captain John Worthington (1650-1701) owned. At the bottom of the Mount, is the Maryland War Memorial.

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I have been there a number of times, including where Capt. John and his family were initially buried until he and his household were re-interred in the Saint Anne’s Anglican Church in Annapolis.

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A photo of a few of his descendants who visited here in September 2000.

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In reviewing these photos, I thought I would find the Website I had found earlier on Pendennis to see what I could find. When I had looked earlier (couple of years ago), the location of Pendennis was out of place from where I expected to find it, based on the time, place, and “paper trail” for Capt. John.

When I did a Google Search I found this website:

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/pendennis-castle/

I knew there were Worthingtons in Falmouth, but the location through me off, so I didn’t pursue it. It being Why Did Capt John name his plantation “Pendennis”? The website, English Heritage had a guide book for Pendennis Castle, so I ordered it. Today, it came in the mail.

Maybe, just maybe, this Bright Shining Object (BSO) will lead to the answer to my question. While looking into this, I will not forget my DNA issue.

Who knows, maybe one of my U.K. Google+ or Blog followers will have some insight on this place. This castle, at least my understanding at the moment, is over 400 years old, well before Capt. John was born.


DearMYRTLE’s DocuChallenge

November 2, 2014
DocuChallenge: Phillips, William D

We were presented with an image from Fold3.com to do the following:

NOW FOR THE CHALLENGE
Let’s answer these questions:

  1. What is this document?
  2. How would you describe the physical appearance of this document?
  3. What does this document say about Ol’ Myrt’s ancestor?
  4. What other people are mentioned in this document?
  5. What information items do you find most reliable in this document?
  6. What information items do you find less reliable in this document?
  7. What value is this document without a citation indicating provenance?
  8. Can you craft a citation for this document?
  9. What would you do with this digital document?
  10. What other record groups should Ol’ Myrt consider after analyzing this document?

This is a Civil War Pension card. We are looking at a digital image of that card.

I transcribed it:

Dead
Name of Soldier: Phillips, William H
Service: Last Rank P, Co K, 19 Reg, Ind Inf
Term of Service: Enlisted [ no date ] Discharged [ no date ]
Date of Filing 1880 June 7
Class: Invalid, Application number 376,996, Certificate No 243,464

Date of Filing 1921 Mar 12
Widow 1,171,114, 8-1-20, 907389

Additional Service A 17 V.R.C.
Died Fed 21 1921, Knoxville, Iowa

“Civil War Pensions; Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900”, digital image, The National Archives (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 31 October 2014); entry for William H Phillips (Co K, 19 Reg, Ind Inf); citing: Civil War Pensions, Pension applications for service in the US Army between 1861 and 1900, grouped according to the units in which the veterans served; NARA T289. no roll number cited.

The first thing I noticed was William H vs William D. Wonder if +DearMYRTLE gave that to us as a hint.

The Soldier, William H Phillips had died:

What this told me was the soldier’s name was William H Phillips and that he was married and left a widow. He was a Private, in Company K, of the 19th Regiment, Indiana Infantry. He Died 1/21/1921 in Knoxville, Iowa, and his widow filed for the pension 3/12/1921.

So far, the information appears to be OK, but….

One thing that caught my eye was the Term of Service, there we no dates. So, I searched to see if there were any Civil War Service Records for William H Phillips that fit the information I had so far.

There was no indication in the Civil War Service Index – Union – Indiana for him, but there were 7 entries, none this William H. The question so far is, Did he serve and when did he serve? Not sure what the A 17 V.R.C. means, yet.

I have been looking at Civil War Records on Ancestry.com, and where I would normally go from what I have so far, would see IF I can find HER pension file. And I found her pension at: U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 for William H Phillips. The numbers matched exactly, as I have seen before. It’s a different card, but should have the same numbers and certificate number. It did. The widow’s name is Louisa Phillips. She filed for the pension in Iowa, where he had died.

That A 17 V.R.C. is also on this pension record. Two documents with the same information.

My next stop was to see IF I could find any more information on the 19th Indiana Infantry Regiment, as I had a hint something was coming. So I went to Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/19th_Indiana_Infantry_Regiment

Having been on a brief Civil War research trip with our spouses, I took this picture at Gettysburg in May.

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The Iron Brigade. I knew there had to be a connection. BUT, I took my next step to see what else I could find out about the 19th.

Before I take my next step in research, I need to mention that the Iron Brigade was involved, in Gettysburg, on Culp’s Hill on 3 July. I also had a Confederate soldier, Ridgely Howard, in that SAME battle and he was wounded in the thigh at Culps Hill. Not in the same part of the battle, DearMYRTLE’s soldier was at the other end of that battle, as there are monuments placed where the units were fighting. Pieces of David Ridgely Howard’s story is in a PBS film on Gettysburg.

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This is the monument for the 1st Maryland.

Back to my research I found this website:

http://www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/unininf2.htm#19th

The kicker for this research, for this DocuChallenge is in the LAST Line on the 19th’s service information:

Weldon R. R. August 18-21”

In William Henry Phillips Find-A-Grave memorial, Find A Greave Memorial #58768920, DearMYRTLE published the details of his pension files, that he served through 1864. So, Was HE, William Henry Phillips, at Weldron R.R. in that battle?

MY Ridgely Howard was wounded for the 2nd time at THAT battle. This time, “wounded in action – upper portion of right thigh, amputated.

David Ridgely Howard lived until 23 December 1927 and is buried in Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland.

IMG_6954


Who is Capt. John Worthington’s father?

March 25, 2013

OK, it’s time to get a discussion going on who are Captain John Worthington’s (1650-1701) parents.

This past week, I had a chance to spend some time in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. The trip to Salt Lake City was planned, but the visit to the FHL was not. Since “I was in the area” with 6,700 other family researchers, I thought I would see if I could find a passenger list or something to give me some more details on Capt. John.

I found it !!! Happy dancing going on in the 2nd basement.

Worthington, Capt. John (1650-1701: son of John, of Jesus Coll., Cambridge, Eng.): came to America with his brother, Samuel; was in Md., 1670; capt. Anne Arundel Co. militia; burgess; judge Provincial Ct.; mem. Quorum; m Sarah. dau of Matthew Howard1

Now, I have heard that this is an unreliable source, but I wanted to see if there were any hints here for other sources. I have, in my files, the “brother Samuel” but loose him in Somerset County, Maryland. But, what about this Jesus College. The problem here is that I have records that show that Frances Worthington as the father of Capt. John and he was from Manchester, Lancashire, England. This is showing John, of Cambridge.

I found a book on the History of Jesus College. Sure enough, there is a Mr. John Worthington, later listed as Dr. John Worthington about 1648, which looked promising. Since this book was about the history of the college I didn’t expect to find too much genealogical information there.

In that book, A History of Jesus College Cambridge, by Arthur Gray, M.A., Mast of the College 1912-1940; and Frederick Brittain, LITT.D. Fellow of the College; Heinemann, London Milborne Toronto, it associated a term, for John, as “a Fellow of Emmanuel”.

Back to search in the FHC Catalogue, I found another to John Worthington in Alumni Cantabrigienses. It was located  where the History of Jesus College was, so I picked it up. Sure enough there was John Worthington. Not one but 4 John Worthington’s. The first of the  John’s refers to “Fellow of Emmanuel, 1642”. Happy dance continues.

BUT, later in the paragraph it says “Brother of Samuel (1644) and father of John Worthington (1680-1).” Oops, the dates don’t work for me. It also says that John married Mary, dau. of Christopher Whichote, Oct. 13, 1657. The dates still don’t work for my Capt. John.

Going back though my file, I do see a reference to Christopher Whichote and Mary but not a good connection.  I went back to the History of Jesus College and there was mention on page 87, speaking of John, “His only son, John, was admitted a pensioner of the College in 1680.”

End of the Happy Dance.

So, I am back to Frances (1624-1668) and Sarah Byrom (1624-1664) married 1648 as Capt. John’s parents. So I am back to The Cathedral in Manchester, Lancashire, England. The couple of a Samuel, born about 1648 and John about 1650. But Samuel is listed as the 3rd child. So, the dates still don’t work for me.

I thought I had broken my “across the pond” problem, while I was in Salt Lake City, but after reviewing the data, I am back asking the question, Who are Captain John Worthington’s parents.

1Frederick Adams Virkus, Immigrant Ancestors:  A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America before 1750  (1942; Reprinted, Baltimore:  Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1976); Page 75; Worthington, Capt. John; Family History Library, 35 North West Temple Street
Salt Lake City, Utah.


QUERY: Descendants of Charles Worthington (1701-1774)

January 11, 2013

This is a copy of a Query Posted on this blog:

 

Russ,

 

Thanks very much for the personal and prompt response. 2,196 descendants of Captain John is astounding but not too surprising considering he had, by my searches, 31 grandchildren; a GREAT start.

 

(If you’ve never read “Adam’s Curse”, by Bryan Sykes, it makes interesting reading on the spread of DNA down through the generations. Apparently a third of all Asians are descended from Genghis Khan.) Anyway, I’m descended from John’s son Charles via HIS son Charles; from which of Charles senior’s four children do you descend? I have attached an Excel copy of my family tree, if it comes through this email, and you can see the Worthington section on page 4, bottom right. My interest, other than playing with spreadsheets, is to find the other siblings of my string, down through the generations.

 

The fact that you know how many descendants are from Captain John and Charles means there’s info out there. Is it consolidated anywhere?

 

Your blog is amazing. By the way, are you aware that the Worthington House at Monacacy Battlefield was bought by John Thomas Worthington, Captain John’s 3rd great grandson by John’s son John? Per my cousin Fred Jenkins who I believe you know or know of. Keep up the good work. Almost forgot, I had planned on attending the Worthington reunion last year but didn’t make it. I live not far away in Kennett Square, Pa. You met my sister Janet. Our sister Peg Ellis is who you apparently received much research info from, as you mentioned in you blog report.

 

John Worthington Austin

 

My Reply:

 

John,

Please email me your spreadsheet to:

hrworth at gmail dot com

DNA results are interesting, and J2 is the term I think you are suggesting. Don’t know about Genghis Khan though.

I know Fred and met many others (not Fred) at the Reunion this past summer. Had a great time.

I was born and grew up in Chester County.

Here is a link to a Descendant Chart of Capt. John.

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/w/o/r/H-R-Worthington/GENE6-0001.html

It may not be current, but it is online.

You are descendant of Charles Jr (1736 – 1799) while I am descendant of John (1733-1803). My family left Harford County between 1815 and 1866. Don’t know off the top of my head when.

Russ


Special Orders #191, the Lost Orders

September 10, 2012

A month or so ago, I posted this: 

Planned Weekend Trip – Day 1

It was a day trip, for me, to be in Frederick, Maryland to hear more about Special Orders #191. I went and had a great time. I learned a lot, not only about what happened to the Lost Orders, but why it was important to the Civil War.

The National Park Service, just posted a YouTube Video about Special Order #191

Special Orders 191

 

There was a lecture on the topic, and a panel discussion by three Civil War Historians. In attendance were descendants of the two gentlemen who discovered these orders.

I won’t go into the details, but what is important to me, and why I spend the day driving, was that the Monocacy National Battlefield has, within it’s borders a Worthington House.

I got to see the actual paper that these orders were written on, as seen in the video and are on display at the battlefield, but to be WHERE they were found. Or at least the area. That was close enough for me.

 

What I learned from that visit, was not so much about the orders themselves, but more about what I learned from the Inferential Genealogy study that I did “in Second Life”. You may recall I mentioned two people, at the Battle of Gettysburg, who fought against each other and that their Grandfathers fought with George Washington. Brother against Brother took on a new, real, meaning for me.

Author Dennis E. Frye, September Suspense, Lincoln’s Union in Peril” was the presenter and was on the panel, described Frederick, Maryland during the time of the Civil War. What surprised me, was that Frederick was “Union” friendly. Knowing that Baltimore was 50 miles (plus or minus) away, but was a “split town”, as was Maryland, split between the North and South. The study I did was on Confederate’s during the Civil War. Why were towns, so close together in my mind, so far apart at the time of the Civil War.

I had a chance to ask Mr. Frye about this. What he explained to me, was that the settlers of Frederick were Welsh and had come down to this part of Maryland from the port of Philadelphia and not the port of Baltimore. Knowing the Philadelphia area, and a bit of it’s history, that all made sense to me. Having just driven from northern New Jersey to Frederick that morning, it made total sense.

The lecture was fantastic. He told the STORY of Special Orders #191, “including citations”. Of course a Historian would have citations, but the reading of the articles he quoted helped put the “story” into a real place. His book has 23 pages of End Notes, and 6 pages of Bibliographical information.

The Panel included two other Civil War historians. The moderator took questions from the audience and asked the panel, in turn, to answer the questions. That is when the discussion became interesting, as each historian, had their own interpretation of the data from their studies.


Fort McHenry, Maryland

August 10, 2012

Last weekend’s “day trip” became two Day Trips. Unfortunately, Patti was not up to the trip, but we agreed that I would make the trip to Frederick, Maryland and the celebration of Special Orders 191 (will blog later on that). Our plan was to spend the night, visit Worthington Valley, then proceed to the Worthington Reunion. (already blogged about that).

It was hot, but there was time.

Since doing my research last summer (Inferential Genealogy), I wanted to Visit Fort McHenry.

IMG_5535

 

The Howard family played a role at Fort McHenry early in the Civil War. While doing that research I realized that Frances Scott Key was in my family file. I had known of other Worthington / Key interactions in the past. There is a house in Anne Arundel County that belonged to Key and Worthington. (but that’s another story).

As you may be able to tell from the above picture, that is was a beautiful day. Fort McHenry has programs in the evenings on the weekends, War of 1812 Twilight Tattoo. Why not …. it gave me a chance to re-visit the Fort, as it’s been a number of years since I last was there AND had no pictures. Great day to visit and to that Pictures.

As may have been a tradition at Fort McHenry, in the evening, there was a gathering of the troops (Tattoo), and as was presented this evening, a band was there, along with the local “ladies”.

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The Chesapeake Concert Band and the Fort McHenry Fife & Drum Corps played for those in attendance.

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Period music was presented, including some music specifically created for Fort McHenry.

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The Traditional Canon Salute was included in the ceremony.

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So why all the fuss about Fort McHenry and Frances Scott Key? According to my database, he was the Father-in-law of my 10th Great Grand Uncle. What ??? OK, he’s distant, but still related. Looking at HOW we are related, I run into TWO, not one, but TWO Revolutionary War “Hero’s”. As reported on this Blog, John Eager Howard, grandfather of David Ridgely Howard and McHenry Howard, of Civil War fame, but also Ann Cooper Whitall, wife of James Whitall. (The Battle at Red Bank, New Jersey).

The Whitall House it across the Delaware River from Fort Mott. Another visit to the Whitall House is in order.

In this one line, I have Revolutionary War, War of 1812, and the Civil War hero’s.

 

More Photo’s can be found here:


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