Samuel Worthington on this day122 Years ago

May 22, 2012

Well, yesterday.

Dear MYRTLE found a Civil War Pension Record for Samuel Worthington, my Great-Grandfather. (1843-1897).

Worthington_Samuel-CWPensionCard

This is a card created when he file this Invalid Application on May 21, 1889. The application number is 705.908, Certificate 699.194. I hope to actually see the documents that this is referring to next week.

“Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934″, digital image, The National Archives (www.ancestry.com), accessed: 22 May 2012; citing  General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. T288, 546 rolls. index for Samuel Worthington.


1940 Census–What did you do with that information

April 26, 2012

As you have seen, I have does my research in the 1940, UNINDEXED, Census records. Put all of the data from those records into my genealogy database management program.

I then took a day-trip to where many of those households were, and took photo graphs of the current houses. Since I have the Census Records in my file, I linked the photographs from that trip, also to the people who lived in those houses.

Google Maps, was the next stop, where you can see “my view” of West Chester, based on those Census Records.

I don’t know about you, but I have two aunts, from my parents generation and I have been wanting to do something for them.

Why not create a book, “Where were you in 1940?” My aunt isn’t “online” so won’t have access to the Google Maps ‘toy’, but her daughter and family and her grandchildren have access to it, but she doesn’t. The purpose of this small booklet was to show her each of the 3 Census Years that she appears in, and some of those pictures that I had taken.

I am able to do all of this, and more, from within my program. The book ended up by being 22 pages, is “at the printers”, and I’ll take it to her in the next couple of days. I know that I am missing a couple of homes where she lived, so the book will be updated. AND, I have a couple of pictures, where I need her help identifying who is in them. So, the 2nd edition is already planned.

Included in the “book” is an introduction, trying to explain what is in the book, a brief summary of some of the information in my file, all generated from within the program, then a Time Line view  of her life, at least the pieces that I can document. Putting her, into context for what is to follow, for anyone else you might receive or see the book.

The a list of 12 address, where she or some of her siblings lived, from information from the Census records. The intent is the link between herself and the US Census.

She was born before the 1920 Census, so I put an image of the 1920 Census. OK, you can’t read it, so I also included a blow up of the family. That is followed by “no picture”. (this is a “give me that address” set up). I think I know where the farm is, cut “Farm 45” isn’t helpful. I will ask if she can tell me where it is located. She might be able to tell me.

The 1930 and 1940 are pieces of cake, same farm, and it is where I lived, and that I have been back to visit a couple of times. I put a series of pictures of the place as it exists today. I don’t know if she has been back there in years, but I’ll guess that some of her grandchildren have not been there.

I tried to take pictures of where her first husband’s family lived. I had the data in my file from those Census Records, but the house number does not currently exist. Another lead in for questions. But, I did find where she lived when she was first married. I don’t know which of three houses she lived in, but she and her new family lived in one house, and a cousin lived two doors away. I can ask, OK, which was yours and which was your cousin’s.

There is another house, where the family when to picnic, at some early family gatherings. It’s ‘famous’, in my mind, as it is written about a family, “The Utah Woolley Family” and a picture of that house is in the book. I am sure there is a story or two about that house. So, I put a current picture into this book.

I then put a photo of my parents first apartment. This is where I found my parents in the 1940 Census, since they were not In the houses where their parents lived. I don’t know if she had ever been there, but if so, what it looks like now.

The next series of pictures are of where another brother lived, including his farm house. I know I hadn’t seen that place in many years, perhaps that picture will bring back some memories.

A photography of another house where we, as a family, visited on a frequent bases. It was where her mother’s sister lived, along with a number of cousins. All documented by the Census Records.

Just a couple of other pictures of houses, not yet in the Census, but should be in the 1950 Census, but houses that she knows. One was her mother’s house, but is also where her step-son currently lives, along with a photograph of her mother and one of our “Texas” cousins. She will know what that is about.

I concluded with two wedding photographs. Both have her parents in them, on of which is of their Wedding. But, I don’t know who some of the other people are. I want her to help be identify those ‘other’ people.

When I go to deliver the book, I’ll have my Flip-Pal scanner, two Flip-Pal Sketch sheet’s, Wet Erase Pen, copies of other pictures so that I can write on the Sketch Sheet as she identifies the people, and scan those pictures with the names on the Sketch Sheet, so that when I get back home, I can label those photographs with names.

So far, that’s what I have done from my “manual” research of the 1940 Census.


1940 Census–Henry Russell Worthington

April 26, 2012

There is no street address, but I know where this is. The 1940 Census called it Uwchlan, Chester, Pennsylvania, Enumeration District 92 – Family 73.

My Grandparents, and all but one of their children were listed.

1940_WorthingtonOrchards

The house was part of the Worthington Orchards, on U.S. Route 100.

This is the Rt 100 side of the house. (Photo not dated)

WorthingtonHouseGarden-1

This next picture is of my Grandmother, keeper of the Garden that was in front of her.

WorthingtonHouseGarden-2

This next picture was taken in 1999 on a visit to the farmhouse.

WorthigntonHouse1999-2

The other side of the house, looking at the front porch. (1999(

WorthingtonHouse1999Side

Another view of the side of the house.

WorthingtonHouse2010-2

The entrance to the house in 1999. This is the entrance we all used. Behind the photographer was where the “Packing Shed” and farm stand once stood.

WorthingtonHouse1999-1

The front of the house in 1999.

WorthingtonHouse1999Front

The farm house with a little snow, but a photo of the Packing House where we ALL worked, year round.

WorthingtonHouseSnow

Thanks to Google Maps, a view of what was the Driveway, from Route 100 to the back of the house as seen above. The driveway above is covered with snow, but it was just up the hill from what’s left of the driveway today.

WorthingtonOrchardDriveway


1940 Census–Henry and Louise Worthington

April 22, 2012

Their first, rented house for $35.00 / month. Didn’t even know they lived here:

1940_Census-WorthingtonHenryjr

At first I couldn’t find them. I started with looking for them with their parents, but they had married in 1939. I knew that Dad had built his house on the farm in Lionville.

House_WorthingtonHenryRussellJr-2010

So, I really had to look for them.

The right half of the building is 223 South Walnut.

House_WC_223SouthWalnut

Oh, it’s for sale.


QUERY: Bessie Worthington

February 24, 2012

Hi

I wonder whether you have any information about Bessie Worthington, daughter of Henry Fraser Worthington.

She married James O’Hara Murray in 1894. James worked for Henry Rossiter Worthington as a mechanical engineer based in Europe – mostly Berlin. James married again in 1898 and is described as a widower on the marriage certificate so it sees Bessie not have a long life.

Any info very gratefully received!

Thanks

Gill


52 Weeks of Abundant Genealogy – Life Experiences

February 8, 2012

From Genea-Bloggers:

Week 5 – Life Experiences: Sometimes the challenges in life provide the best learning experiences. Can you find an example of this in your own family tree? Which brick wall ancestor are you most thankful for, and how did that person shape your family history experience?

This challenge runs from Sunday, January 29, 2012 through Saturday, February 3, 2012.

52 Weeks of Abundant Genealogy by Amy Coffin is a series of weekly blogging prompts (one for each week of 2012) that invite genealogists and others to discuss resources in the genealogy community including websites, applications, libraries, archives, genealogical societies and more. You do not have to be a blogger to participate. If you do not have a genealogy blog, write down your thoughts on your computer, or simply record them on paper and keep them with your files.

52-Weeks-Abundant

Sorry for running late on this, but it’s been a long, busy couple of days. Am finally catching up.

Being a RootsTech 2012, in Salt Lake City, was a real boost for me. The best part of the trip was to be able to spend time with Genea-Bloggers. I didn’t try to keep count as to how many of the 90+ Genea-Bloggers who were there that I met, but I think I met most of them. What an awesome group.

I have never been a writer, so this blogging “stuff” is out of my league. However, there are a couple of folks in my family tree who were writers, perhaps not by trade, but did a lot of writing.

My Great-Grandfather, Samuel Worthington, was one of them. I have copies of letters that he wrote “home” during the Civil War. Apparently, he also was a writer for his unit in the Civil War and was published in Ohio.

The second writer, was McHenry Howard. A little distant relative, but his writings provided a lot of detail for the 2nd Maryland Regiment (CSA), again for the Civil War. His writings gave detailed information on that regiment that put in perspective what a soldier’s life was like during that conflict.

But the real hero, for me, was my grandfather’s brother, Josiah Wistar Worthington, Col. V.C., U.S.A. His stories and letters are now in book format Hell and Beyond, a Diary of War and Captivity, Compiled and Edited by Frances Worthington Lipe.

This book is full of Uncle Wistar’s letters “home” telling his story of his captivity during the 2nd World War. He had been captured twice, and the poems, in the letters, helped communicate his experience without those letters being destroyed because of the content of them.

These three writers, brought home, their experience of their war to those their families. My experience of “war” was sent home in the form of audio tapes that I had sent home while I was in Vietnam. One of these days, I’ll have to get them put into digital format.


Facebook and Blogs

February 7, 2012

As you might know, I just returned from Salt Lake City, UT and Roots Tech 2012. Lots of topics, talks, chatting, looking a techie stuff and lots of other things, including talking to other Genea-Bloggers.

We heard a lot about Social Networking in many formats.

About an hour ago, My friend Midge Frazel, of Granite In My Blood, simply posted, on FaceBook “Quaker Family: Small Breakthrough”. Since I read and follow her blogs, I had to look, especially with my Quaker Roots.

Her “small breakthrough” had a link to the Quaker “Monthly Meeting” in Adrian, Michigan. I know that place. I opened my family file, went to Adrain in my file to verify who had an event there.

2012-Places-MI-Adrain

Elizabeth Willits married Samuel Leeds in Adrain. Elizabeth is my 2nd Great Grandmother.

Midge continued to say to do a Google Search in Google Books, as that is how she found more information. She posted a link http://www.michmarkers.com/startup.asp?startpage=L1844.htm

The Google Search found this article:

Friends’ review: a religious, literary and miscellaneous journal, Volume 31 and on page 825 was this article.

Willits-Leeds-Marriage

Samuel Leeds was her second marriage. She had previously married Henry Wilson Worthington.

Lesson Learned: The value of Social Media.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,863 other followers

%d bloggers like this: