Watch what you Wish For

December 24, 2011

Today we celebrated Christmas with my daughter, her husband, and three of the cutest “grandpups” “this side of the Mississippi”. OK, this side of the Delaware.

Some time ago, and I don’t even remember doing this, I put a book on one of those “Wish List” websites. I can’t tell you when I last visited it, but I did. Anyway, I got two books, one of which was on my wish list.
“Doctors In Blue”. The subtitle was ‘The Medical History of the Union Army in the Civil War”.

Why on earth a “medical book”? Oh yeah, Civil War. If you have been following that blog, you might note that I now have some interest in the Civil War. Medical? Don’t think so.

Oh, but what about the Sanitarium I had been looking for, where my Grandfather worked. Maybe that’s it.

I my have had question marks on my forehead or something, because Carrie said “you had it on your wish list”.

But her next question got my attention. “Are we related to the Author”? WHO? was my answer. George WORTHINGTON Adams. My next answer “no clue”.

As I have gotten into the habit of carrying my iPad2, I fired it up with the Ancestry AP and brought up my tree. Nope, not here.

But her question took me to Google search, and entered his name. Found what I was looking for. Who he was and what he did. A couple of hits down the list what what looked to be the beginning of a Family Tree. Hmmmm… Do YOU have your Tree Online? was the first thing that came to mine. Sure enough, I figured he would have been, probably one generation before I found the Worthington surname, which I did. Follow that back to Charles Worthington b: 1701.

THAT’s OUR Charles Worthington, was my reply.

Carrie and Patrick were on their way to see Patrick’s Uncle Ralph. Now Uncle Ralph and I have some things in common. One of which is that we were both in Vietnam about the same time, have been known to visit cemeteries. He captures some great stuff with pencil and paper, I try with a camera (with or with out film).

One of his Christmas presents was the same book that I got, and another Worthington (related) book that I had probably given to Carrie, but it was also about the Civil War.

As Carrie has also done some family history research, she asked my “and how are WE related” to “them”. The Them was the author of the TWO books.

Carrie had joined us in the opening of the Worthington Trail, at the Monocacy Battlefield, just south of Frederick, Maryland. One of the farms, where this battle took place, was a Worthington Farm. I have posted about there here before. One of the people that lived in that house, as the time of the Civil War Battle wrote a book about his experience. Fighting for Time; The Battle that Saved Washington, by Judge Glenn Howard Worthington.

Having my genealogy online I gave here our ancestry back to the common ancestor for Judge Worthington.

Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701)
John Worthington 1689-1763
John Worthington 1728-1790
James Worthington1772-1854
John H Worthington 1793-1858
John Thomas Worthington 1826-1905
(Judge) Glenn Howard Worthington 1858-1934
(author Fighting for Time)

That’s one book.

The Doctors in Blue looks like this.

Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701)
Charles Worthington 1701-1774
Samuel Worthington 1746-1821
James Worthington 1779-1813
Thomas Worthington 1801-1888
George Balford Worthington 1846-1895
Minna Worthington 1870-1949
George Worthington Adams 1905-1981
(author Doctors in Blue)

John and Charles were brothers. John the oldest, Charles the youngest.

But, where are WE?

Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701)
Charles Worthington 1701-1774

John Worthington 1733 -1803
Samuel Worthington 1785-1853
Henry Wilson Worthington 1815-1866
Samuel Worthington 1843-1897
Henry Russell Worthington 1887 – 1953
Henry Russell Worthington Jr 1916-2006

We also are descendants of Charles Worthington (1701-1774)

Uncle Ralph will be impressed??? (don’t think so) But wait, Carrie, Patrick and Uncle Ralph are going to the town where another of my ancestors lived, the Whitall House.

One more genealogy report.

Samuel Worthington (1843-1897) was married to:

Sarah Catherine Reeve 1849-1894
Job Whitall Reeve 1800-1861
Hannah Whitall 1775-1832
Job Whitall 1743-1798
James Whitall 1717-1808 Ann Cooper 1716-1797
(Owners of Whitall house during revolutionary war)

Uncle Ralph’s wife keeps reminding me that my ancestors are everywhere. Yup, even in her own neighborhood.

Guess I better be more careful for what I wish for. Another branch to research. That makes three. Two going back to the Civil War. That’s two in two weeks. Guess I know what I will be doing in 2012.

Uncle Ralph, Enjoy your new books.


Inferential Genealogy – Research Broadly

November 28, 2011

Its been a while since I updated this project. Haven’t stopped, but have taken a break.

In the mean time, I have been working on a Brick Wall for a Genea-Blogger, Randy Seaver. His “Brick Wall” came about the two of us using our favorite genealogy software. I have blogged about that on my Family Tree Maker blog.

This blog post is not about software, but a Road Trip I just returned from to address this brick wall.

Basically, Randy is looking for the Parents of Willam Knapp (1775 – 1856).

So, why am I interested? Easy, my wife has Knapp’s in her ancestry, and we have visited more than one cemetery looking for and at Knapp headstones.

To put this into perspective, I mapped out the Birth, Marriage, and Death Location on a Map.

William Knapp (1775-1856)

 

Consider: Birth 1775, Dutchess County, NY; 1804, Woodbridge, New Jersey; 1856, Newton, New Jersey.

I do NOT challenge or question any of Randy’s research. It is awesome. I have learned a couple of things from his research. My advantage, maybe, that I know these places. By car, mostly interstate, between Dutchess County and Newton is over 2 hours today. But to through in a 3 hour “detour” to Woodbridge, in the 1800′s, leaves me with some questions.

We have tracked my wife’s ancestors between the two end point a couple of time, no detours, didn’t pass go to collect our $200.00 and it’s on one road Route 94, in both New York and New Jersey. The cemetery visits were along that road. Goshen, mid-way is full of Knapp’s. More questions.

In reviewing Randy’s notes, included a comment about Dutchess County. I had one perspective of Dutchess County based on today’s maps. Not questioning the “starting” point for William, but to make sure I was looking at the Right Starting point. The pin-point on the map is close enough (for government work).

Consider this (from wikipedia)

Putnam County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York, in the lower Hudson River Valley. Putnam county formed in 1812, when it detached from Dutchess County.

OK, so now the “starting point” just grew a bunch. The good news, more places were we have found Knapps, the Bad News, more Knapps.

I need a (K) nap (p).

From my earlier experience with Baltimore, I had to get into my head the territory. (there’s a song in there somewhere). I bribed my wife into taking a road trip to see if we could find any of her Ancestors. She agreed and she took some research notes with her. That’s another story.

I did some looking at Find-A-Grave before we left. I knew that the Dutchess Genealogy Society / Library was closed today, but that was OK. I wasn’t sure where to start in Dutchess County (current county) but figured that where ever that library was, would be a good start. Find-A-Grave gave me a bunch of Cemeteries. Searched for Dutchess County for Knapp, found over a hundred possibilities, looked closer at a couple of “big hitters”. That is, a bunch of Knapps, but with 1700 headstones. Not looking for William, but perhaps a sibling, if there are any, or some other names to look for, trying to back into William’s family. Perhaps a book store or historical society looking for clues.

The clue there was to find out why William might have left Dutchess County, to head south to meet his wife. Have read some of the history of her family trying to find out if she had been somewhere before she ended up in Woodbridge. That wasn’t the case, in fact she had pretty heavy times to that area and Hackensack, New Jersey where she returned to after her husband died. So, at this point, William went south, but why.

More questions. Found an old book store, Nothing, zip, zero, Oh well. On the way to the first cemetery, we ended up on a road “New Hackensack Road” in New York. Not too far down that road was NY State Route 94. OK, what’s going on here?

Came to the first cemetery, Bethel Baptist Church of Shenandoah Cemetery. Small and very nice. My Find-A-Grave printout said there were 42 interments there, most that have been posted were, in fact, Knapps. From the parking lot in two directions, you could see Knapp headstones.

I usually try to find the history of a Church if there is one. There was a car in the parking lot, but nobody was home. Ran down my first set of batteries, had to go back to the car for the back up, and on my way back for more pictures. the Pastor of the Church walked to his car, and wanted to know if he could help. History? nope, BUT … like that word … but “I know someone who does”. Actually he gave me two names. He pointed me to a Headstone, which is where I was headed back to, and one of the names used to be the Historian for East Fishkill, which is not far from where we were. AND (more good news I hope) he is a genealogist. Quick Email to Randy for “future reference” and posted a picture to Facebook.

Isaac Knapp - Founder of this Cemetery

 

OK, so he died in 1859. I wonder.

Although that is where we are right now, but I just found a couple of other bits and pieces to look for.

On the trip to Poughkeepsie, I was expecting to find a Negative Source. Some hint as to why Randy hasn’t been able to find any information. But, I know have a contact who might be able to shed some light on why can’t we find William Knapp, any historical event (like a burnt court house) that causes us not to be able to find any records, why would young Knapp go down to New Jersey?

The term “I know a guy” has been running through my mind on the return home from this trip.

Lesson Learned: Keep looking. Look sideways (look for siblings or descendents of siblings), Ask a local Historian; Keep asking questions. I have the questions, but may have found someone with an answer or two.


Blog Query: Samuel Worthington

October 2, 2011

Received from : Texana twlawler@ymail.com

John Worthington (1618-71) was master of Jesus College and Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge. Other Worthingtons were nonconformist ministers: John of Dean Row, and Robert of Mottram-in-Longdendale, who in the 1640′s fought the power of established church. Samuel Worthington was on of the 1st to follow Fox’s Quaker movement to Penn. in America. John’s diary is free to read on line and it’s quite interesting!.

My Reply:

Texana,

I think that the Samuel Worthington you are talking about is the Samuel “the Quaker” Worthington or Robert “the Quaker” Worthington who landed in West Jersey. My other reply about Samuel applies here, is from my research on that line would indicate, the two Samuel’s are the same Samuel.

Hope that helps. I also hope that if others of confirming or different information that they would post a comment to this Blog Post.

Thank you,

Russ


Fearless Females Blog Post: March 14 – Favorite Female Ancestor – Prompts for Women’s History Month

March 16, 2010

This is part of  a series of daily blogging prompts entitled Fearless Females created by Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog in honor of Women’s History Month .

I’ll pass on this prompt:
* March 13 — Moment of Strength: share a story where a female ancestor showed courage or strength in a difficult situation.

March 14 — Newsmakers?

Did you have a female ancestor who made the news?

Why?

Was she famous or notorious?

Did she appear in the social column?

Well, Rear Admiral  Grace Hopper tops this list. There are many newspaper articles found online. Most of them deal with her military experience in the U.S. Navy. Several articles talk about her retirement. Or, more accurately Retirements.

There is one article with President Ronald Reagan in the Oval Office.

Earlier articles about “Amazing” Grace spoke of her experiences with the computer, from the beginning of computers. As I mentioned earlier, she found the first Computer Bug. Wonder what she would think of the technology that we have available in 2010, only 20 years after her death.

But, I guess if you can explain and show a nano-second to a bunch of engineers, she would probably say “told you so”. After all, its easier to say “I’m sorry, then to get permission”. (one of her quotes)


Fearless Females Blog Post: March 10 – Favorite Female Ancestor

March 10, 2010

This is part of  a series of daily blogging prompts entitled Fearless Females created by Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog in honor of Women’s History Month .

Here are the prompts – consider honoring your female ancestors by posting at your genealogy or family history blog!

Took the ‘day off’ yesterday, to visit my 93 year old mother. Each visit is a almost a day long event.

However, it was a multi-event visit. Spent a wonderful hour and a half with a Facebook friend at Starbucks. Can’t get any better then that.
Stopped by to pay respects to my Dad in the memorial garden of the Church where I grew up. Being a contributor to the Find-A-Grave website, I took pictures.

Spent Tuesday, March 9th creating a database file for that Memorial Garden, which had been started, but only had one interment listed. Uploaded the file, updated the Find-A-Grave website, then posted the entire Memorial Garden on the website, as well as posting the images for T0mbstone Tuesday.

The assignment for March 9:

Make a family document (baptismal certificate, passenger list, naturalization petition, etc.) and write a brief narrative using the information.

Chose to skip that assignment and do the Find-A-Grave work instead. (good excuse, huh?)

* March 10:

What role did religion play in your family?

Oh, yeah.

My Dad’s family were Quakers, going way back. My Mother’s family were Episcopalian, but not so far back. However, going back to the earliest Worthington, Capt. John, the Anglican Church shows up again.

Below is a picture of my Grandfather (Mom’s father), My Father, my brother and I. Three of the four, in this picture were / are very active in the Church.


How did your female ancestors practice their faith?

While visiting the Memorial Garden at Grace Episcopal Church in Haddonfield, New Jersey, I was reminded of the Worthington Room in the Parish Hall.

My mother spent hours and hours in this room, and the room that preceded it helping with the many tasks of running a Church of this size. The folks in this picture were her companions doing things like putting Sunday Bulletin’s together, Monthly Newsletters, etc. The Room was named in her honor.

If they did not, why didn’t they?


Did you have any female ancestors who served their churches in some capacity?

My mother was the first female to be on the Vestry (governing body) and warden of that church. She was the Treasurer for years and years. She also tied the ties in the first picture for my brother and I, and all of the other Choir Boys, in Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, West Chester, Pennsylvania.


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