Road Trip with a Surprise

April 2, 2016

Just got back from a trip to Fairfax, Virginia to help DearMYRTLE with 4 presentations at the Fairfax Genealogical Society Spring Conference.

On the way home, I had two stops to make. One was to drop off a book that I had created on the Worthington’s who lived in the Worthington House in the Monocacy Battlefield.

On the way there, I stopped by an old cemetery just south of the Battle field to see the renovations that had been done to the Zion Church and Cemetery, Founded in 1802.

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Here is a picture I took in 1999.

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and today

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Incredible.

Dropped of the book, as promised but stopped by the “Thomas Farm” house, the neighboring farm to the Worthington House. Have driven by it many times, but not close enough to take a photo.

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(the surprise is coming)

I have a 2nd cousin who lives just north of Gettysburg, but have never stopped by to visit.

The “back story” is that I works for my 2nd cousin’s father one summer. I knew about “the Gettysburg Farm” but didn’t know where it was. Today, I stopped, not out of the blue, but they were going to be home and it was OK to visit.

The surprise was as soon as the door was open, I thought I had escaped by 60+ years, as the smell of Apple Sauce cooking just rolled out of the door. It was like walking into the kitchen of my grandmothers house, or even my mother as they cooks apple sauce. I had forgotten just how great freshly made, home made, apple sauce really was.

Where was my camera when I needed it. On the stove was an apple sauce grinder just like my grandmother had and used on the stove, with it still dripping the sauce. In fact, the grinder was my grandmothers SISTERs apply sauce grinder doing all of the work, with a little help from my 2nd cousin.

Oh was that good.

After catching up a little and talking about what I had been doing, and sharing my spare copy of the Monocacy book, we talked about my other cousin DearMYRTLE and how we were connected. Now, my 2nd cousin was from Chester County. I mentioned one of the names on a Power Point slide the Myrt showed in Fairfax the day before, and my cousin know immediately the surname. I didn’t have to say any more. We talked a little more and mentioned Conrad Weiser, one my Myrt’s ancestors.

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This is the Conrad Weiser Homestead in Womelsdorf, PA.

As soon as I mentioned “Weiser”, my cousin’s face lit up, her husband got up and went to a collection of CDs and brought back a Music CD by a Weiser. (sorry, forgot the artist name). But my cousin’s children KNOW the many Weiser family members living in the area. Now the homestead is probably 45 minutes away from where I was, but to make that connection, was NOT Expected.


Civil War–150 Years Later and Ridgely Howard

July 3, 2013

My cousin, Dear MYRTLE, made a comment on Facebook about the Civil War and that she and Mr. Myrt were watching a program on Gettysburg. Last night, I found a link to a program on Gettysburg online, so I decided to watch this 88 minute program.

http://www.history.com/shows/gettysburg/videos/gettysburg?m=5189717d404

What I didn’t realize, until about 50 minutes into this program, that I had seen this program before. I knew that I had from how the program was done, but didn’t connect the dots as to what this program was about.

“Ridgely Howard” was mentioned, as a 33 year old, slave holder from Baltimore and that his grandfather served with George Washington during the War of Revolution, and that this family was of the “plantation class”. I know this guy. I spend a summer researching Ridgely Howard trying to find out who he was.

I did a series of blog posts on my search for Ridgely Howard:

https://worthy2be.wordpress.com/tag/2nd-life/

There may be a couple of blog posts in that series that is not about this research, but about the 3rd blog post is the end, at that time, of my search.

It turns out that David Ridgely Howard (1844 – 1927) was my 5th cousin, 4 times removed.

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I was reminded about James Wallace, whose grandfather served in the same regiment as did Ridgely Howards grandfather with George Washington.

What I didn’t catch the first time, was that David Ridgely Howards house has been reported to be haunted. I’ll have to look into that.

After Ridgely was wounded, on this day, in the morning of 3 July 1863, he would return and be wounded a second time, but this time he lost a leg. The amazing thing is that he lived until 1927.

 

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Robert J Driver Jr, First & Second Maryland C.S.A. (Bowie, Maryland:  Heritage Books, Inc, 2003), page 205 – Capt. James McHenry Howard (left), 1st Maryland Infantry, and his brother David Ridgely Howard, Co A, 2nd Maryland Infantry, were photographed in Canada in their Confederate uniform at at the war’s end. David has a metal “cross button” pinned to his breast, which is believed to have been the insignia of the Maryland Line (see Plate H2, Dave Mark Collection).  H. R. Worthington – Book Shelf


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Civil War Book

July 7, 2011

As the quest to follow the steps outlined in the Inferential Genealogy process, I am looking into sources that I might not have done in the past.

My order from Amazon.com arrived today. Two books, but not the two I wanted. But one of them helped to make the connection in the Gettysburg program on the History Channel.

The Book, Gettysburg – Culp’s Hill & Cemetery Hill, by Harry W. Pfanz (1993) puts Col. James Wallace and D. Ridgely Howard together in this book. What it points out that former “neighbors” were fighting each other on the battlefield.

The point in the story where they were at the same place at the same time, D. Ridgely Howard had been wounded on Culp’s Hill and had a broken leg. The Union soldiers were approaching him, and being taken, he was asked “What made you so brave?” along with other questions, including “Do you know that you are fighting your own men?” meaning fellow Marylanders, and Howard replied, “Yes, and we intend to fight them.”

He was being questioned by the 1 Maryland Regiment, Eastern Shore. The regiment commander was Col. James Wallace. He is reported to say “sorrowfully gathered up many of our old friends & acquaintances [from the Confederate battalion], & had them carefully & tenderly cared for.”


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