Facebook and Blogs

February 7, 2012

As you might know, I just returned from Salt Lake City, UT and Roots Tech 2012. Lots of topics, talks, chatting, looking a techie stuff and lots of other things, including talking to other Genea-Bloggers.

We heard a lot about Social Networking in many formats.

About an hour ago, My friend Midge Frazel, of Granite In My Blood, simply posted, on FaceBook “Quaker Family: Small Breakthrough”. Since I read and follow her blogs, I had to look, especially with my Quaker Roots.

Her “small breakthrough” had a link to the Quaker “Monthly Meeting” in Adrian, Michigan. I know that place. I opened my family file, went to Adrain in my file to verify who had an event there.

2012-Places-MI-Adrain

Elizabeth Willits married Samuel Leeds in Adrain. Elizabeth is my 2nd Great Grandmother.

Midge continued to say to do a Google Search in Google Books, as that is how she found more information. She posted a link http://www.michmarkers.com/startup.asp?startpage=L1844.htm

The Google Search found this article:

Friends’ review: a religious, literary and miscellaneous journal, Volume 31 and on page 825 was this article.

Willits-Leeds-Marriage

Samuel Leeds was her second marriage. She had previously married Henry Wilson Worthington.

Lesson Learned: The value of Social Media.


Watch what you Wish For

December 24, 2011

Today we celebrated Christmas with my daughter, her husband, and three of the cutest “grandpups” “this side of the Mississippi”. OK, this side of the Delaware.

Some time ago, and I don’t even remember doing this, I put a book on one of those “Wish List” websites. I can’t tell you when I last visited it, but I did. Anyway, I got two books, one of which was on my wish list.
“Doctors In Blue”. The subtitle was ‘The Medical History of the Union Army in the Civil War”.

Why on earth a “medical book”? Oh yeah, Civil War. If you have been following that blog, you might note that I now have some interest in the Civil War. Medical? Don’t think so.

Oh, but what about the Sanitarium I had been looking for, where my Grandfather worked. Maybe that’s it.

I my have had question marks on my forehead or something, because Carrie said “you had it on your wish list”.

But her next question got my attention. “Are we related to the Author”? WHO? was my answer. George WORTHINGTON Adams. My next answer “no clue”.

As I have gotten into the habit of carrying my iPad2, I fired it up with the Ancestry AP and brought up my tree. Nope, not here.

But her question took me to Google search, and entered his name. Found what I was looking for. Who he was and what he did. A couple of hits down the list what what looked to be the beginning of a Family Tree. Hmmmm… Do YOU have your Tree Online? was the first thing that came to mine. Sure enough, I figured he would have been, probably one generation before I found the Worthington surname, which I did. Follow that back to Charles Worthington b: 1701.

THAT’s OUR Charles Worthington, was my reply.

Carrie and Patrick were on their way to see Patrick’s Uncle Ralph. Now Uncle Ralph and I have some things in common. One of which is that we were both in Vietnam about the same time, have been known to visit cemeteries. He captures some great stuff with pencil and paper, I try with a camera (with or with out film).

One of his Christmas presents was the same book that I got, and another Worthington (related) book that I had probably given to Carrie, but it was also about the Civil War.

As Carrie has also done some family history research, she asked my “and how are WE related” to “them”. The Them was the author of the TWO books.

Carrie had joined us in the opening of the Worthington Trail, at the Monocacy Battlefield, just south of Frederick, Maryland. One of the farms, where this battle took place, was a Worthington Farm. I have posted about there here before. One of the people that lived in that house, as the time of the Civil War Battle wrote a book about his experience. Fighting for Time; The Battle that Saved Washington, by Judge Glenn Howard Worthington.

Having my genealogy online I gave here our ancestry back to the common ancestor for Judge Worthington.

Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701)
John Worthington 1689-1763
John Worthington 1728-1790
James Worthington1772-1854
John H Worthington 1793-1858
John Thomas Worthington 1826-1905
(Judge) Glenn Howard Worthington 1858-1934
(author Fighting for Time)

That’s one book.

The Doctors in Blue looks like this.

Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701)
Charles Worthington 1701-1774
Samuel Worthington 1746-1821
James Worthington 1779-1813
Thomas Worthington 1801-1888
George Balford Worthington 1846-1895
Minna Worthington 1870-1949
George Worthington Adams 1905-1981
(author Doctors in Blue)

John and Charles were brothers. John the oldest, Charles the youngest.

But, where are WE?

Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701)
Charles Worthington 1701-1774

John Worthington 1733 -1803
Samuel Worthington 1785-1853
Henry Wilson Worthington 1815-1866
Samuel Worthington 1843-1897
Henry Russell Worthington 1887 – 1953
Henry Russell Worthington Jr 1916-2006

We also are descendants of Charles Worthington (1701-1774)

Uncle Ralph will be impressed??? (don’t think so) But wait, Carrie, Patrick and Uncle Ralph are going to the town where another of my ancestors lived, the Whitall House.

One more genealogy report.

Samuel Worthington (1843-1897) was married to:

Sarah Catherine Reeve 1849-1894
Job Whitall Reeve 1800-1861
Hannah Whitall 1775-1832
Job Whitall 1743-1798
James Whitall 1717-1808 Ann Cooper 1716-1797
(Owners of Whitall house during revolutionary war)

Uncle Ralph’s wife keeps reminding me that my ancestors are everywhere. Yup, even in her own neighborhood.

Guess I better be more careful for what I wish for. Another branch to research. That makes three. Two going back to the Civil War. That’s two in two weeks. Guess I know what I will be doing in 2012.

Uncle Ralph, Enjoy your new books.


The continued search for the Stair Case

September 16, 2011

In this Blog post: https://worthy2be.wordpress.com/2011/02/03/in-search-of-montmorenci/ I continue my search for these two staircases. Earlier, I mentioned that the 2nd staircase was located at the Winterthur Museum in Delaware. I joined there, with my daughter, so we could visit this wonderful museum and learn more about it and the staircase Its a wonderful place to visit.

Recently, they started a blog:

http://museumblog.winterthur.org/

So, I posted this question:

To the Staff:

Wonderful new Blog. Thank you.

I hope it’s OK to ask here.

In the museum, you have the Montmorenci Staircase. That staircase, as I understand it, came from South Carolina from a house called Montmorenci. I have seen photos of that house and have seen a couple of brief stories.

However, not an hour south of Winterthur is another Montmorenci which also has a Montmorenci Stair case.

So, my question is, how come there are Two Montmorenci’s and both of those houses have similar staircases.

My guess is, that the answer lies within architectural information about one or both of the houses. Did the architect or Mr duPont know of the Maryland Montmorenci.

I have posted some information on the Maryland Montmorenci here:

https://worthy2be.wordpress.com/tag/montmorenci/

Thank you for your time an consideration and I look forward to your new Blog posts. With any luck, I’ll get back down to Winterthur this fall.

Thank you,

Russ

I did get an answer. Perhaps not the answer I wanted, but here it is.

Russ, I checked with our estate historian, and here’s what she says: The answer has to do with a coincidence of name. A French aristocrat named Montmorency commanded troops under Rochambeau in the American Revolution and became an American hero. There are many towns and houses named after him. The staircase in Maryland is curved like the one from the house named Montmorenci, which was located near Shocco Springs, North Carolina, but is not free-standing. The free-standing curve is what interested du Pont. Hope this helps!

So, for now, I will put my research aside for a while, as there may not have been a connection in the first place. The time for the naming of the property may be the connection, but what about the stairs. I need to make another visit to Maryland to get a better look at the staircase and to see if I can find “the rest of that story”.

So, for now, back to my Civil War Hero.


The Face of Genealogy

June 5, 2011

This is in response to a number of Genea-Bloggers who have seen and read an article in the LA Times.

To Quote from http://www.geneabloggers.com/face-genealogy/

In a recent event article at the LAWeekly website, the above photo was used in a brief article about the upcoming Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree being held in Burbank, California from June 10-12, 2011.

I won’t post the was included in the article, as it certainly does not represent the Images in my Family. I will post one here:

Grandparents 50th Wedding Anniversary


Blog Reader to Blog to Flickr to Headstone Photos

April 14, 2011

Just a short note of Thanks to Blogger Gale Wall of the Digital Cemetery Walk Blog.

While reading my daily Blog Reader messages, I came to a recent Blog post by Gale. I have been following this blog for a while, as I also have interests in Cemeteries. The posting was about updating her Flickr page(s) and how to utilize what she has posted on Flickr. I have been working on doing the same thing.

When I looked, what caught my eye was the Kansas Cemeteries. Looked down and saw Lyons County, where my ancestors lived. The cemetery was Cottonwood, also a name that was familiar to me. Scrolling though the 60 some odd photos was my 2nd Great Grandfather’s (Job Whitall Reeve) stone and a couple of his children.

A couple of clues for me, 1) confirmation of where they were buried, 2) the stone flat on the ground would confirm to me their Quaker Heritage, and 3) a couple of dates were confirmed.

A special Thank You to Gale for sharing her photographs Online, so “we” can find them.


New Record Group

March 28, 2011

While attending an Online Chat in “Second Life”, we were talking about Land Patents. This is a Record Group that I had not looked into before.

Knowing that my Great Grandfather, Samuel Worthington (1843 – 1897) and his wife, Sarah Catherine Reeve (1849 – 1894) moved to Kansas, where my grandfather was born (27 July 1887), I decided to see what I could find. So, off to this website:

http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/

There were four listings for the children of Samuel and Sarah.

(Mary) Elizabeth Traver Worthington (1886 – 1941), who married Willits Reeve Worthington (1872 – 1942), Henry W(Wilson) Worthington (Jr) 1853 – 1938), and J (Josiah) Wistar Worthington (1888 – 1953).

Land Patent Number 291284

Land Patent Number 291284

This Land Patent was issued 12 day of September, 1912 and signed by President Wm. H. Taft.

“Whereas, a Certificate of the Register of the Land Office at Dodge City, Kansas, has been deposited in the General Land Office, whereby it appears that full payment has been made by the claimant J. Wistar Worthington according in the provisions of the Act of Congress of April 24, 1820, entitled “As Act making further provision for the sale of the Public Lands.” and the acts supplemental thereto, for the Southwest quarter of section twenty-two in township thirty-two south of range forty-three west of the sixth principal meridian, Kansas, containing one hundred sixty acres.”

The Mapping feature on the website did not appear to be working, so that I could see how the other two Land Patients were located. Henry Wilson Worthington, Jr, and Mark Willits Worthington’s Land Patients were in Morton County and appear to be very close.

Elizabeth Traver Worthington was in Stevens county.

Now to learn was the other information on these documents mean.


In Search of …. Don’t forget the Newspaper

February 23, 2011

I have posted a couple of times that I am searching for information about Montmorenci (Maryland) and it’s staircase. During this process, I received a comment, from the Blog, from someone who I has lost contact with. During our “conversation” I was told about an event that took place at Montmorenci.

I did some searching, but didn’t get anywhere. However, I had signed up for a Webinar that was being provided by Legacy Family Tree. The webinar’s title was:

Newspapers: Critical Resource to Complete Your Family Tree The speaker was Thomas Jay Kemp.

More about this webinar can be found on this website:

Legacy Family Tree

Looking at the menu at the top, is Training, and Webinars. I haven’t put the link directly to the Webinar, as the recording of that Webinar will not be available after March 10, 2011. But the Legacy Family Tree Webinars have been very educational.

The topic was on how to take advantage of the GenealogyBank website. Thomas said a couple of times, “don’t forget the newspapers“. (or at least that is what I heard).

That was on February 2, 2011. Just a couple of days earlier, I had received the email, mentioned earlier. In that email was:

“I was also told that a husband was murdered by his wife in .. house. I’ve always wanted to research that story!”

Thomas’ comment and that email stayed with me until the end of the Webinar. Didn’t want to miss any of his words of wisdom.

Webinar over, headed over to Genealogy Bank, and look at their Historical Documents collection. Having listened about how to search, I wanted the best results, quickly. Had to find that article.

What I knew was that the murder happened at Montmorenci. Of course, Worthington’s built that house and it was in the family until the early 1900’s. BUT, I didn’t want to guess that it was a Worthington. Didn’t know the name, nor date of the Murder. But, I did know that Montmorenci was in Maryland, and that it was in Baltimore County. So, I selected Maryland, and Baltimore County.

Didn’t want to enter anything BUT Montmorenci in the Include in keyword search. There were a couple of pages of “hits”. I looked at the articles which confirmed some of the information that I knew about the house, property, and people who lived in that house.

The 10th Hit was:

Shot Dead by His Wife: Sad Fate of Mr. L. L. Conrad
1883-08-08
Sun Newspaper (Baltimore)

Bingo.

What a story it was (is). There is a lot of genealogical information in that 1883 newspaper article. Some confirming what I knew, but the level of detail of the event were outstanding. I won’t go into the details about that, but what a story.

But, there is more work to do. As the opening line said:

Lawrence Lewis Conrad, a great-great nephew of George Washington …” got my attention. His wife was “Miss Minnie Worthington”. So, another branch to follow.

Of course, I passed this information along to the person I was emailing.

But, the story doesn’t end there.

I attend a “local” Family History Interest Group (FHIG), in Bernards Township, NJ at the local library. I have been known to speak there, but it’s an hour away so I don’t always get there. The topic last night was on how to use America’s Genealogy Bank. The Reference Supervisor, Ruth Lufkin was the speaker. She gave a great presentation on the America’s Genealogy Bank, as the library uses it’s resources. She showed us (about 40 of us) how to use it, with tricks on how to use the search, what you might find.

I had mentioned to Ruth, when I got there, that I had a story about my experience with Genealogy Bank. She said that she had been looking for some connection between Genealogy Bank and FHIG.

As the say, “and the rest is history”.

The bottom line here are two fold:

1) Don’t forget your Library

2) Don’t forget the Newspaper

Thank you Ruth, for letting me share my story.


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