Hints to solve another Mystery

September 7, 2015

For years, I have seen references to Samuel Worthington, brother of Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701). But have always lost him in Somerset County, Maryland. Other Worthington researchers have not been able to find any descendants.

In the past couple of Blog posts, I have mentioned that I was looking in the State of Maryland Archives website. I think that I found out why.

GRATED: by 1689, as a free adult.

RESIDED: in Somerset Parish, Somerset County.

FAMILY BACK-GROUND. Possibly related to John Worthington (1650-1701). MARRIED Alice (?-1739/40), daughter of Arnold Elzey, Gent., (?-1733), a justice
of Somerset County, 1693-1699, 1702-1709, and
wife Major Waller. Her brothers were John (1693-
?), who married Anne Catherwood; and Arnold
(1695-?). Her sisters were Sarah (1683-1753);
Elizabeth; Major (1685-?); and Anne (1686-?),
who married first, Robert Catherwood (?-1715),
and second, by 1718, William Stoughton (1692-
1759). Alice married second, Merrick Ellis (?-
1732) of Somerset County.

CHILDREN. Probably died without progeny.

A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland Legislature 1635-1789 by Edward C. Papenfuse, et. al. Volume 426, Page 915

pile of old bricks

I have some follow up to do on this, to see if I can verify what is in this article, so I have a few more bricks to move out of the way to make sure I haven’t miss anything coming forward in time.

Now, I have to go back to the other side of the pond to see if I can find John AND Samuel with their parents.


Image courtesy of GenealogyInTime Magazine http://www.genealogyintime.com – See more at: http://www.genealogyintime.com/GenealogyResources/Wallpaper/free-images.html#sthash.Oke9zsXD.dpuf

Getting Closer RE: Capt John

September 6, 2015

Still looking at the Maryland Archives, identified a number of records whenever I get back down there when I ran across, what may be, THE record I was looking for.


or how about this


Of note, the Marke Cordes mentioned above was also mentioned in the English property transaction in my earlier blog post.

Now to figure out what the document really means.

Was he, or Was he NOT an Indentured Servant?

September 6, 2015

I hope that I have someone to take a look for Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701) in some records, at the Maryland Archives. The long told story is that he came from England in the mid to late 1600’s, probably around 1675. Further, the story was that he was an Indentured Servant of “Lord Baltimore”.

Over the past couple of days, I have been trying to understand WHICH Lord Baltimore, as there may be as many as 7, and when “he” would have crossed the pond, bringing the lad John Worthington.

That was one mistake. The mistake being that John Worthington was “on the boat” with ”Lord Baltimore”. The second mistake was what an Indentured Servant really was. Mistake number two. What I currently understand that term to mean is that someone PAID for the passage of “the indentured servant”.

When of realized those two mistakes, I think I have determined which “Lord Baltimore” paid for his passage. Charles Calvert, the 3rd Barron Baltimore was in Maryland, in 1675. Right “title”, time, and place. Now to find a record of that, and my research says there will be records.

As I have learned in the resent past, and currently teach, BEFORE you visit an Archive, see what that have Online. I did and the Maryland Archives have a number of volumes with Legislative Proceedings on this topic. Haven’t found what I was looking for yet, BUT, I did find this.


A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland Legislature 1635-1789 by Edward C. Papenfuse, et. al. Volume 426, Page 913

A nice profile for Capt. John. My new conflicting information is high lighted. 1678 or 1679 as a FREE Adult.

The full article has too many “probably” statements, I get that, but there are even more questions that come up. His parents names are OK, but later on, there is mention of Samuel Worthington that is “possibly” related to John.

Samuel has a profile as well, but he disappears from records within a generations, I have known about Samuel before and have looked, and he disappears.

Not at all comfortable about this new information.

However, in the profile is mention of a Land Transaction in England 01 February 1676/77 which will be my next “Bright Shiny Object”.

Maryland, Wills and Probate Records–Capt John

September 2, 2015

Just spent the last hour looking at a new record on Ancestry.com


I believe this is the Last Will for Capt. John Worthington (1650 – 1701). It will take a while to transcribe it, but I am certain that it is him.

This document was created in 1699 and it had all of the right children, known at that point, references to other extended members indicating property Capt. John owned. The plantation, on the Severn River was mentioned,

At first, I wasn’t sure, the way that the information was presented on the screen, but reading (what I could) it’s his.

I had a date in my file for when the will was Proved. The date was the same, the year was not, but I think the information I had may have been in error.

Two children weren’t listed, be that was because they were born after the will was written, one of those children died very young, the second carried the name of that baby, and was Charles from whom I descend.

Yesterday I spent a while trying to make the Pendennis connection, the plantation and the castle, so I see a trip to Annapolis, Maryland in my future. Just not seeing any hint as to why Capt. John would name his plantation Pendennis. But, did HE name it or when what his plantation named. Property had names, which the will pointed out and I have other records of, but why Pendennis. Why would at “young lad”, that is Capt. John have that name linked to him.

The Pendennis Castle was involved in a siege in 1646. King Charles I was the King at the time (trying to confirm that), and there was a John Arundel (1576 – 1654) tied to the castle. Arundel being the county, in Maryland, where Capt. John lived.

Thank you Ancestry.com for this new Record Collection. It should keep me busy for a while.

What’s in a Name ? Pendennis

August 31, 2015

A couple of days ago, I was re-organizing some of my genealogy photographs and was reminded of Pendennis Mount across the Severn River from Annapolis in Maryland. This is the photo that I took, Pendennis Mount on the Severn.


It is the name of the plantation that Captain John Worthington (1650-1701) owned. At the bottom of the Mount, is the Maryland War Memorial.


I have been there a number of times, including where Capt. John and his family were initially buried until he and his household were re-interred in the Saint Anne’s Anglican Church in Annapolis.


A photo of a few of his descendants who visited here in September 2000.


In reviewing these photos, I thought I would find the Website I had found earlier on Pendennis to see what I could find. When I had looked earlier (couple of years ago), the location of Pendennis was out of place from where I expected to find it, based on the time, place, and “paper trail” for Capt. John.

When I did a Google Search I found this website:


I knew there were Worthingtons in Falmouth, but the location through me off, so I didn’t pursue it. It being Why Did Capt John name his plantation “Pendennis”? The website, English Heritage had a guide book for Pendennis Castle, so I ordered it. Today, it came in the mail.

Maybe, just maybe, this Bright Shining Object (BSO) will lead to the answer to my question. While looking into this, I will not forget my DNA issue.

Who knows, maybe one of my U.K. Google+ or Blog followers will have some insight on this place. This castle, at least my understanding at the moment, is over 400 years old, well before Capt. John was born.

Letter addressed to Cousin Russ

March 18, 2015

Backing up a couple of days ago, but in the order in which I read this stack of letters, I finally opened this envelope.




It may be difficult to read, but it is addressed to “Cousin Russ”.

Two things about that, 1) If you are on Google+, I am sometimes called that, but 2) that is how some of these letters are addressed, that is to “Cousin ….” Mary, Jody and family, to me, have always been known as our Texas Cousins.

Jody, Mary, and Frances do live in Texas, but the other brother, Will, lives in Arizona. Texas Cousins, none the less.

In the letter / note, Mary said “After Jody’s mother Bernice died in September 1966, I became Aunt Polly’s penpal in her place”, that important, as the letter from Anna to Mary and Jody talked about their Aunt Polly, my Grandmother may not be able to write any more letters and that Anna, my Aunt Anna, would write as she could.

My start in genealogy, now for me Family Research, started from my Texas Cousins, for which I am most grateful. Mary mentioned “There are also 2 letters from Anna and one from Eleanor. I just couldn’t bear to thrown them away.” Thank you Mary.

Now to have time to start to read the letters from Aunt Polly to Mary and Jody

Letter #2–Aunt Anna to Jody and Mary

March 16, 2015

Slowly working my way through these unexpected letters from our “Texas Cousins”. The first letter was dated 30 September 1972, where my Aunt Eleanor told of the accident that involved one of my cousins. The very next letter, in order, was dated 12 August 1970, new year earlier, from her sister Anna to Jody and Mary.

She tell of the happy arrival home, from Turkey, of the same Kenny and his wife Edie. The “U-Haul” was involved, as with the first letter, but this time it was Ken and Edie packing and moving to Omaha.

Other news including the story about Eleanor’s daughter Bernice’s wedding of 31 July 1970, and the role Anna’s children would play in that wedding.

This picture was taken in Ocean City, New Jersey, of Anna and Eleanor, so the sisters were close even back then.

Family_Worthington_Anna Worthington_Eleanor-1923

The major part of the letter was about their mother, my Grandmother. When Anna and her husband returned to West Chester, they had a phone call from their brother Bob, letting Anna know that Mother hadn’t been feeling well and “the Dr. ordered her to the hospital”. The saddest part was “Mother’s eyes are so dim so, I doubt if she will be able to write much more – if at all”.

I am sure that the rest of the letters will be the letters that my Grandmother had been sending to Jody and Mary, and Anna was letting them know that there probably wouldn’t be many more.

My Grandmother would die 3 month’s later.

She closes the letter telling the Texas Cousins that Ken and Edie had found a trailer to live in, very close to the Air Force base and that Ken has a job lined up at a Honda Shop. That job would cost him his life in 1972.

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