QUERY: Alice Worthington Tucker

February 3, 2017
Derrick Mcintosh
dmack3400@gmail.com
Question- Is there any relation or could you tell me what the connection is between my grandmother Alisha Worthington Tooke(Born Alice Worthington Tucker) and CC Worthington?
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Genealogical Proof Standard–Chapter 3 Homework

January 18, 2017

 

GPS_RosePromo

Christine Rose, Genealogical Proof Standard: Building a Solid Case 4th Edition Revised, (San Jose, California: CR Publications) 2014.

https://www.amazon.com/Genealogical-Proof-Standard-Christine-Rose/dp/0929626214

Chapter 3 of this book, Evaluating the Records, is something we need to do, for everything we might consider putting into our genealogy database. I do this several times, during the process of my data entry.

  1. Looking at the description of the item in question. For example: the description of an online database. Who created the record group, what was it’s purpose, what am I looking at
  2. When crafting a Citation (I do this up front) I need to determine what I need for the Citation, but that also makes me think and evaluate why I want to use this record
  3. Evaluate this “new” record as it is entered in relationship with other records for a specific Event or Fact
  4. Does it make sense in context with the other information or does it present conflicting information

The best example I can think about is a profile I have in an Online Tree.

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It looks straight forward, the information is cited appropriately. But, this view is only showing my “current thinking” or some might call it my conclusions. But, if I were to look at the Alternate Facts (ALT Facts), I have a different view.

2017-01-18_004002

As each of these entries were entered and cited, they were evaluated, made sense as stand alone entries and entered, but when I put the Census Records in context of the other records, there is conflicting information.

Although my current thinking, is that this person was born in Indiana, but I need to resolve the conflicting information. The “current thinking” is that this person was born 11 Mar 1824 in Indiana, based on an email from the family researcher and a Find-A-Grave entry. There were 7 other records that indicated this person was born about 1825, 1828 in Ohio or 1829, in Indiana.

There is conflicting information, as far as I am concerned. a year or two difference in the same place from Census Records, may be OK, but in this case, after evaluating the Birth Fact, I am not so sure.

Further evaluation of the data at hand, I find that the Contributor for the Find-A-Grave Memorial is the author of the Email that I had received for this profile.

Bottom line on this one, I am not sure that my “current thinking” is correct. I am not disagreeing with the family researchers, but I know that I must find a more reliable record, original if possible, to resolve this conflicting information. I have not completed my Reasonably Exhaustive Research.


Genealogy Proof Standard–2017 Study Group Chapter 1

January 3, 2017

Getting ready for the 2017 Study Group on the book Genealogical Proof Standard, Building a Solid Case by Christine Rose, I discovered that I may have talked about Chapter 1 in an earlier blog post.

We’re Related–Clean Tree Report

I say that, because I am not sure that a Clean Tree reflects that I am working toward the steps that are discussed in this chapter. Yes, it is clean to a viewer, who might not know about the GPS or understand what they are looking at. On a mobile device or in the Ancestry Member Tree APP, but it does not reflect GPS. I have come to call the Clean Tree a Conclusion Based Tree. I was introduced to that term a couple of years ago. Didn’t like it then, don’t like it now.

HOWEVER, in doing some study of the features in an Ancestry Member Tree, keeping the GPS in mind, specifically in Chapter 1, the “Messy Tree” with the available features on the online tree, does both.

I see the Conclusion Tree (No ALT Facts), but can turn the ALT Facts ONE to see “how I got to the conclusion”.

The trick now, is how do I convey some of my research to a Guest on that tree. In most cases, IF you look at the details or Alternate Facts, you see pieces of the Fact, like Abt Year as one Fact, State for the same fact but a different citation, and the Preferred (Clean View) with the complete date and location.

Using the features that I described in that blog post, I think the Messy Tree does reflect the GPS as described in this Chapter. I would not call my Ancestry Member Tree a Conclusion Tree, but my “Current Thinking Tree”. Afterall, there are new records coming online every day.

I did a Video about this topic, if you are interested:

Back2Basics – Clean vs Messy Online Tree


Free Online Education

December 8, 2016

Just signed up for 112.50 Hours of Online Education at Legacy Family Tree Webinars.

There is a link to the website on the Right side of this Blog and Blog Post.

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The are great sessions and handouts. The Speakers are the best. Not to mention the Host, Geoff Rasmussen, what a wonderful job he does.

The best part, is that they are recorded. That is most beneficial for me, because two days a month, I am teaching a class while the Webinar is live. I can watch it when I get home.

I have been known to show a couple of minutes to my class so they can see what it is all about.

The best part, if this isn’t enough, I have an annual subscription, which really helps me with my scheduling issue.

I signed up for the year with ONE mouse click. From the Legacy Family Tree Webinar newsletter announcing the schedule for the year.

Please use the link that I have provided

Thank you


Spelling Doesn’t Count–Mystery solved

October 12, 2016

Guess I shouldn’t have made that the title of the post, so you get that answer, before how I got there.

The problem, genealogical question, is Where is the 120 Acre Farm, owned by this Civil War Soldier?

Before I get there, what I learned is, not only have another set of eyes look at the problem and where you are, but another discipline set of eyes. What I learned is that a person at a Historical Society might approach a problem (or Genealogical Question) from a different angle.

I had been emailing two members of the Washington Township Historical Society and their approach was certainly different. One program that they offer, at least once a year, is a Historical House Tour. So, they might use Deeds far more than I would or have. They know where to look. Very helpful hints.

Today, I knew that some one was going to be at the Museum so I stopped by to see what else I might find. I had mentioned that the father of my soldier “rented the Dufford farm”, from a reference book they had in their collection.

I was presented with a 2” wide box for that surname, as there is a local family organization in the area, as the family has been around for a very long time.

While I was looking through that collection, another person went to look at maps. A similar map from want I had been looking at. Much clearer, but know knows the historic area better than I, but I heard “I found something”. There is was … all I can say …. “spelling doesn’t count”.

Ort_J-1887-Map-SpringLane

Who would have looked at Woertz, when I was looking for Ort, on the map. I had seen that on the map, but had not oriented by mind to where that was in reality.

Now, I had found my Civil War Soldier’s family with a street name, so I knew where the property was from the Census Record. The Map showed the same location.

I had done the Census, back a page or two, forward a page or two, so I knew the neighbors. The bad part of that is, the combination of names are very similar around the township.

The 1880 Census was my next stop (again).

,Ort-1880-Census-1

Then I remembered, no “next page”. But, the answer is on the previous page

Ort-1880-Census-2

Across the street on the map, very nicely shows D. Dufford, as does the Census.

A different set of eyes, different way to research, AND “Spelling doesn’t count”, helped me identify the 120 Farm that was talked about in that Pension File.

Thanks to the Washington Township Historical Society for helping resolve this Genealogical Question.


More on the Post Office

October 11, 2016

Over the weekend, I listened to the Board of Certified Genealogists / Legacy Family Tree Webinar series. Great job to the presenters and a Thank you to Legacy Family Tree Webinar for making these recording available.

Specifically to Judy G. Russell‘s BCG/Legacy Family Tree Webinar “When Worlds Collide: Resolving Conflicts in Genealogical Records” you can now catch it for FREE for a limited time! http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1310

The point that I picked up on, was that we can, at some point in time, put one of our time consuming, reasonably exhaustive research (or search) aside. That was important because I have been spending a lot of time trying to determine how this Post Office indication, in this 1870 Census record played a role in locating this farm. Was it an important “issue” to walk away from.

Not willing to just walk away from it, I took one more try. I went to another website, in this case FamilySearch.org to see what I could find there. Went to their Wiki and located their Census Records.

I wanted to look at the same data, but from a different angle. It was easy to locate the Township Census Records, found what I was looking for and went to the First Page for the township. Sure enough the same Post Office. Went to the last page, same Post Office. Because of the way this website presented the data, I thought about the notion of a page or two before you entry, and a page or two after your entry. Just did that for my township. What about the neighboring township? Sure enough, I finally found my “permission” to put this “issue aside. The next township also had the SAME Post Office on all of it’s pages.

But, did the township borders change? Earlier I had located a Google Book entry for the History of the County, so I located a hint about that:

Washington_Township-Pg-22

No impact there. So, the Post Office issue, for the 1870 Census is off of my plate. Thanks Judy.

Before “this chapter” is closed, I am in the process of going page by page (image by image) through that 1870 Census, to locate all of the households for the family I am searching for. The earlier Map I share before clearly showed that at least two farms had the right names associated to the property. Now can I find them on the image. So far, using the usual search hasn’t found them, but if I browse the images, I may find what I am looking for.

My current thinking is that if the Civil War widow is asking for an increase in her Pension, specifically mentioned 120 acres of land, in 1907, I should be able to find that farm.

One more bit of information. I found another map that had the farm owners name AND the acreage and year of purchase of that property. Not, the farm wasn’t listed there either.

Back to the Historical Society, but with new questions.


Follow Up on the Post Office, Pension Challenge

October 10, 2016

As a follow up you my earlier post

1870 Census and Post Offices–A Challenge

I decided to put some data into a time line so see what that might show me.

Here is a time line of what I found about the Post Offices that appeared in the Pension file.

Ort-PO-TimeLine

(remember, spelling doesn’t count)

I have started a spreadsheet to help be catalog the 126 pages of pension files. For this pass, the only concern that I had was to capture dates and Post Office names. I have a few notes to go back to, but trying to see of the Date and Post Office would tell me anything.

 

Ort-Pension-PO-TimeLine

From the Pension file, Schooleys Mountain was the Post Office in the file from 1870 until 1907. That would indicate that they were living “on the mountain”. As you can see, 1907 and 1908 the Post Office changed to German Valley (the post office in “the valley”). Then, in 1910 returned to Schooleys Mountain.

So, something happened in 1907, right? Well, the Civil War Soldier, died 21 Oct 1907, so it appears that the Widow relocated to “the valley” with family. Several of the documents in 1908 talked specifically about 120 Acres that she had.

The 1900 Census shows that my Civil War Soldier was on “the mountain” with his wife and 4 children. I know where that property is located. The youngest son, would purchase a farm “in the valley” in 1916 (our 100th anniversary farm). But, the widow, returned to “the mountain”.

Why did she go back up “the mountain”? Could it be that a grandson still owned the farm on “the mountain” after he purchased the farm “in the valley” ? There was still family about where I think the farm is located today in the 1940 Census. Could that be the 120 Acre Farm?

But, why the 1870 Census Post Office being 22 miles away, with other Post Offices still active at the time.

Back to the Historical Society, for another look at their information on the Post Office and to see if they have any other Maps. I have already reviews the Online Maps, but before the 1900’s. They may also have access to or  can point me to, Deeds for the Property that I know about, and to the size of that Farm.


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