With a little help from our friends

March 16, 2016

The  other night, I was finishing getting caught up on Facebook when I cam across of post card image. it was posted by Genea-Blogger Becky Jamison.  Her Blog Grace and Glory is one to follow. I have the honor and pleasure of meeting Becky and her husband Larry at Roots Tech.

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Her Facebook post was about images from Kansas towns. The one that was posted was an old one. Since my Grandfather and his family were from there in the mid to late 1800’s I had to look.

Images of Kansas Towns and Cities

I just had to look. I have been focusing my research on a 5 generation file that I am working and blogging about for DearMYRLTE’s FINALLY Get Organized! project.

IMDoingIT

I had just found my Great Uncle in a census record in Manhattan, Kansas. The address was right near the Kansas State College, now University. I knew he went to school there so I followed that Bright Shiny Object (BSO) and looked around the campus, specifically the Veterinary Medicine part of the campus, because that is where he went to school.

A long night,  long story short, I sent an email to the email address on their website, asking for any information they might have on my Great Uncle.

Four hours later I received an email with a 7 page article that had been written about his life and his story. What I received was a marked up copy of the article, so I don’t have any way to cite the article, but I want to thank Colonel Dr. Howard H. Erickson, PhD for that wonderful telling of my Great Uncle’s life.

Most of the information in the article is known to me, but there were details that I didn’t know about.

I have written about Colonel Josiah Wistar Worthington before, and have tried to share what I know of his story. I have found his World War I and World War II Draft Registration cards.

As the article clearly states, my Great Uncle was not assigned to where the “War” was happening, as he joined the Army at the beginning of the war but had a comment that there must be more to come for him, and his military service. And there was.

The article also put into perspective the cost for the education at that time and place. One item, of many, said that it cost “$5.00 for a commencement fee”

There was an answer to one of those BSO questions that I have had, but didn’t have it on my ToDo list, was to understand WHY I found a Bureau of Land Management record for him when I visited the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) a couple of years ago. This article put him in the right place at the right time for my Great Uncle to go after land in 1912.

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Thank you Becky for sharing that BSO.


Tech Tuesday–A Mystery in a Census Record–Update

March 10, 2016

Earlier this week I posted

Tech Tuesday – A Mystery in a Census Record

Well, I missed something else, thanks to a blog reader. Thanks Dr. Donald.

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He kindly pointed out that I missed the M1 and M2 in the column. In reality that confirmed what I hope that I suggested in the earlier blog post. That HE was married before and that this was her first marriage The fact remains that she had no children and they had been married  about 1884.

Like I said in the Tuesday post, it is in the Detail. I had miss that confirming hint, for me at least.


Tech Tuesday – A Mystery in a Census Record

March 8, 2016

Yeah know there is something fishy when you see a Son and Granddaughter listed in a 1910 Census Record BUT the Wife had no children born, nor living.

Russell_Henry_C-1910_Census

The relationships are clean, but looking at that one box for females in the 1910 Census, that asks the number of children born and number of children living and the answer to both is zero ( 0 ), something is wrong.

I got the son and granddaughter as the relationships are spelled out for me. But, looking as his age could be 40 or 48. Which is the right age is not the issue, BUT, it does show that he was older than the 26 years that the Head of Household and his wife were married.

The Head of Household and his Son immigrated in 1868, it appears in the same year, and probably at the same time. Haven’t found that record yet. The son and his father were both born in Ireland. The “wife” was born in Pennsylvania.

Interesting other item on this record is that the Son, has listed 2 Children Born and 2 Children Living. One of them is living in this household in 1910.

I am going to guess, that I may or may NOT find how the Son’s mother is. But, I have updated by database to show that the “wife” in this census record is not the mother.

It’s in the detail. Those two columns have left me with a number of unanswered questions, but also had me look for children who might have died earlier.

Lesson Learned: Pay attention to columns 11 and 12 in the 1900 census and columns 10 and 11 in the 1910 census


Finally Get Organized–Part 3, Scheduling

March 7, 2016

The calendar has rolled over to March. Yeah about a week ago, but …

This whole calendar thing might have gotten me off track for getting Organized. All of the Letters, All of those Photographs, so little time. Did I mention that I now have 4 large envelops of letters from my Cousin?

But looking at the next couple of months, my usual calendar for out side the home activities is pretty much under control. But, there is that word again, the person leading this FINALLY Get Organized, DearMYRTLE and I are jointly giving four presentations in Fairfax, Virginia the first weekend in April and I have one of them to do. Not a new presentation, but one that I had “retired” due to the subject at hand and some other events in the community that I hang out it.

IMDoingIT

The topic that Myrt and I thought I could present was a talk on “Information Overload”, well hope appropriate is that.

A couple of comments I have seen as this series of blog posts have made their rounds folks want me to follow those BOS’s (Bright Shiny Objects). Since Information Overload is about several thousand Shaky Leaf Hints, talk about BSO’s, I wonder IF there is time to GET ORGANIZED.

Stay tuned as I go through my Genealogy Tool Box to see if there IS a way to do “all of the above” and to get organized while doing that.

I’m thinking about getting back to those 5 generations item on the FINALLY Get Organized Check List has a role in THIS Information Overload.


And my “Current Thinking Is …”

February 26, 2016

There were two very important things about this photo:

  • The Photo is in archival sheets
  • The Photo is documented

This may make no sense to you, but I have been working on a mystery. That is how did my Great Grandfather and Great Grandmother meet.

WFA-1127

I knew about the Cottonwood Friends Church and that my Great Grandparents were married there 27 Feb 1872. But, that note is the hint I was looking for.

Reeves & Garland families went to church here. Elizabeth W. Leeds met the Reeves & Garland families here. Samuel & Catharine Reeves Worthington were married here.

The Reeve and Garland families moved to Kansas, from Tennessee between 1859 and 1861. Why, is still up in the air. I hadn’t gotten far enough to realize that the Garlands were there as well.

Job Whitall Reeve and Hannah Lucinda Garland are my 2nd great grandparents. Their youngest child was born in 1859, and Job died in Kansas in 1861. That is how I know the time frame.

Elizabeth Willits Worthington Leeds was my Great Grandfather Samuel Worthington’s mother. Lots more about her, but that’s another story.

So, “my current thinking is” that my great grandparents met “at church”, or more appropriately “at meeting”.


Unwrapping of a Photo CD from my cousin

February 26, 2016

Will share my first viewing of some photos I just received from my cousin. There are over 500 photos on this CD. Just going to share what I am seeing for the first time

 


What did I learn ?

January 21, 2016

In this blog post Is re-organizing your files helpful ? what did I learn ?

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The first think that I learned is that my Dads brothers were involved it putting together information that they knew or learned from “some body”. My Uncle Bob was the author of the letter, but typed my his brother’s wife, my aunt. So, it was a “family response” from the Pennsylvania cousins.

A couple of the Pennsylvania Cousins are missing here. There were 5 siblings, my two aunts and my Dad was not part of this letter. Now, my parents had moved to New Jersey about 20 years earlier, so they may not have been aware of what was going to in response to a letter they are responding to. But, why the two aunts not mentioned?

What IS very interesting is that then names throughout the letter were written in such a way that you can tell to the players are, which person referred to. In this part of the letter, names were spelled out. Someone knew how to communicate to a genealogist. Cousin Frances was the genealogist, having picked that up from her mother. For me, knowing the players, it was very clear who they were talking about.

Clearly, the writer and the reader were Quaker. Growing up Thee, Thy, were very common terms used in the faith but also in the family. Every once in a while I hear those words from the remaining sibling.

Another Quaker tradition was how some of the dates were recorded. “2nd Mo. 15-1872”. Not quite the traditional format, but the 1978 way of recording a Quaker date.

What I didn’t know, nor have I seen before was a hint where he, my Uncle Bob, wrote

“The children were not a11 together at all times with Samuel and Sarah C. prior to their deaths. This is understandable as both Samuel and Sarah died of tuberculosis and were in failing health for several years. Several letters from Sarah C. Worthington disclose these facts:”

What caught my attention was “the children were not all together at all times”. How sat and the parents both died of tuberculosis. There are several new bits and pieces in the “several letters” that I will share later.

Comments like “in my father’s handwriting” is awesome, with “fall of 1896”.

Got a kick out of this question:

Does thee remember hearing about H. Russell and J. Wistar and the other children going out on the prairie to gather “Buffalo chips” to use as fuel in the stove?

The quote points out how the names were very clear as to who they were, but it also reflect the living experience of the 1880’s living in Kansas. Buffalo Chips ???

Here’s a good one.

Does thee have a picture of the log cabin in which our fathers were born?

House_Worthington-Kansas-House

I believe that is the picture he was talking about. My cousin would have drawn, in charcoal, a picture of this picture.

The published book, was really cousin’s collaborating using the tools of the day. Oh wait, that wasn’t that long ago.

I am reminded that “not everything is online”. In this case, some things are nicely filed away in your organized filing system, just waiting to be (re) looked at.


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