Parent’s 73 Anniversary

July 14, 2012

Wishing my parents a Happy 73rd Wedding Anniversary today, as they were married July 15, 1939.

Henry Russell Worthington Jr (1916-2006)

Louise Strode Worthington (1916-2010)

Married July 15, 1939

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A family photo taken on their 60th Anniversary.

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July 1999

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July 15, 1939

Mom and Dad - 1994

1994

 

Miss you lots!


The Battle of Monocacy–148 Year Ago

July 8, 2012

It’s called the Battle that Saved Washington.

July 7, 2012, the National Park Service celebrated the Battle of Monocacy that took place on July 9, 1864. It was to have been a two day event, but the temperature was in the 90’s, so they backed it off to one day. Monocacy is a couple of miles south of Frederick, Maryland.

So what was it like in 1864? Don’t know, as I haven’t found any temperature readings for that date and place, but there was much to be learned about this battle.

There were three farms along the Monocacy River, where this battle took place. One on the North side of the river, the Best Farm, Two on the South, the Thomas and Worthington Farms.

The Best Farm:

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The Thomas Farm:

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And the Worthington Farm:

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The owner of this farm was John Thomas Worthington (1826-1905) who is my 4th Cousin, 3 Times Removed. His ancestor was the oldest son of Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701), while my ancestor was the youngest son of Capt. John.

Judge Glenn Howard Worthington (1858-1934) was the son of John Thomas Worthington who wrote the book “The Battle that Saved Washington”.  It should be noted, that Judge Worthington was involved in creating this National Battlefield before his death in 1934.

The re-enactor’s for the day, were “in uniform”, as they may have been 148 years ago, and had a number of demonstrations to give a hint as to what the battle might have looked like.

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The story teller, gave us a hint into the life of the Confederate Army at the time of this battle.

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The above photography was demonstrating a Skirmish Line, as an advanced party ahead of the Confederate Army that was behind them.

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The Union story teller, walked us through “by the 9 count”, and what that was so important.

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The Union Army was demonstrating “by the 9 count” way of firing. Oh, did you know that 4 teeth and 2 fingers were required to be in the Army? We learned why.

The National Park Service provided information about the importance of this battle. This was the only battle that the Confederate Army won on Union Soil?

The Confederate Army was going to take Washington, DC. The Union Army was “out of place”, and were trying to get re-enforcements back to DC to fortify the city.

The Union Army was able to slow down the Confederate Army for “a day”, allowing those re-enforcements to get back into place.

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The heat of the day, watching the demonstration, helped put this battle into perspective, from the stories of this battle, at this place, 148 years ago.


War of 1812 (as lived in 2012)

July 1, 2012

As we remember the War of 1812, I took yesterday to “relive”, if you can do that, a piece of that war.

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I went to Boston for OpSail 2012 Boston. Little did I know that I would have a history lesson in that War. The history lesson was on board the Pride of Baltimore II.

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The Captain of the trip told the passengers of the role of this type of “ship” in the War of 1812. Although the Bride of Baltimore II was not part of that war, but vessels in the style of this ship WAS part of that war.

Was we sailed into Boston Harbor, we joined other sailing vessels in the Parade of Tall Ships.

Several of the Tall Ships are current training vessels for current navies around the world. One of while is ‘America’s Tall Ship”, the US Coast Guard Cutter Eagle.

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Traditional firing of the Canon was shared between vessels.

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But another “tradition” among “Ships of War” was that of the Fire Boat. The tradition of ships returning from War were greeted by Fire Boats. The USCGC Halfmoon (WHEC-378) had a welcome home on January 22, 1968.

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The Pride of Baltimore II, although not involved with any war, was greeted as a replica of a vessel that took part in the War of 1812.

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About ready for a Great Adventure

January 30, 2012

Clothes are packed, techie stuff gathered, emails and blog post caught up, now to try to get some sleep.

After staying home but watching all of the events, and blog posts from RootsTech 2011, I decided that I wasn’t going to miss the 2012 event. I signed up as soon as we were able to register. It’s almost an overwhelming event.

But, I have had a couple of warm up events. Wouldn’t have missed them either, but this is a “biggie” for me.

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Why go to such an event?

I could answer that by saying “It’s in Utah”. That is true, but my granddaughters live there, does that count? So, this time tomorrow, I should be having dinner with them. Can’t wait.

Why THIS event, specifically? Three reasons, I think.

1) Genealogy

2) Technology

3) Meet Genea-Bloggers

Not necessarily in that order. Not that I am a Techis person, but I have my toys. Been in on some leading edge techie stuff over the years, but a place where Genealogy and Technology gather in one place, sounds like where I’d like to spend three days. Certainly from everything from last year, there was no way to miss it this year.

But the third item is the real reason for going. Over the past several years, I have met, talked to, read many blog posts from each of the Official List of Genea-Bloggers, and most of the 90+ Genea-Bloggers that will be there in their blog posts. I will NOT be able to connect Genea-Blogger to Blog, but I have checked, and I don’t think that I don’t follow any of the Bloggers that will be there.

Why Blog? Cousin Bait.

But, the Genea-Bloggers is a community of wonderful people. For example, a group gathers for Genea-Blogger Talk Radio on Friday nights. Who listens to Radio ??? It’s not the AM / FM / Stereo Radio, but a Talk show, none the less, Show Host Thomas MacEntee lines of topic specific shows each week for about an hour and a half. While we listen to the “radio” there is a very active Chat going on, while the show is progressing. A couple of shows, there have been over 100 people in the Chat Room.

It’s those folk, and the Bloggers that I am hoping to meet, hang out with, go to class with, but to Learn FROM.  As I understand it, Genea-Blogger Talk Radio will be Live from the Family History Center in SLC. Guess where I will be. But wait, isn’t that the opening of Season 3 of Who Do You Think You Are? What a better place to be, then at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

I have to say, that I have been there twice before. Totally overwhelmed by what is there. But this time, I will have follow and learn from others. I know I should have a goal for a visit to the FHL, but I don’t. I will have my research on my iPad, the ability to take notes, take pictures, just in case I find what I am not looking for.

Will post as I am able.


Mayflower Descendant in the Family

November 22, 2011

Some of my Genea-Blogging friends are posting their Mayflower descendants in the blogs. Midge Frazel, of Granite in My Blood posted her proven lines today. Our Proven Mayflower Lines. After looking at her names, I had to look at my database, as the names were familiar to me.

When I looked at the names, I saw some strange relationships between myself and John Alden, which would mean that I might not have a direct line back to him. Then I realized what the connection is to this Mayflower Ancestor. My Son-In-Law is the descendant of John Alden.

John Alden to Patrick


Veterans Day Tribute 2011

November 11, 2011

I posted something on Facebook that may have made no sense to anyone on Facebook. So, I thought I would expand on it here.

I said:

Veterans Day 2011– To all of those US Coast Guard crew members of CG Ron 3, as we prepared to get underway for our tours in Vietnam. I thank the crew of the CGC Halfmoon (WHEC-378) that we each did our duty to return home and for making a difference for those who we supported, especially the Soldiers and Marines who we provided cover for and the Navy ships that provided us with what we needed to do our assigned tasks.

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The above is the Coast Guard Squadron 3 outboard of the USS Jason.

I was in the Coast Guard from 1964 to 1968 with most of my time on board the Coast Guard Cutter Halfmoon (WHEC378). In April 1967 we left Staten Island, New York for “an extended cruise”. After joining 2 other Coast Guard Cutters from the east coast, we journeyed to Hawaii. There we joined two other cutters.

There has not been two many times when 5 Coast Guard Cutters are in convoy across the Pacific from Hawaii to the Philippines.

From there we spread out to various assignments off of the Vietnam coast.

I wanted to Thank the crew of the CGC Halfmoon for all of the tasks that each of us had to do just to keep this “old” ship, some would have called it a rust bucket, running.

But our task was at least two-fold, 1) to do off shore support for the troops on the land, and 2) small boats, or river boats providing them with Fuel, Food, Films, Mail so that they could do their job.

TheCGC Halfmoon was 311 feet long. This let us get closer to the shore then the much larger navy ships.

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This was a “82 footer” coming alongside for fuel. This cutter was running up and down the nearby river.

Now, the CGC Halfmoon doesn’t carry that much extra supplies, so we went further off shore to catch up with the Navy to take on Fuel, for ourselves and for sharing, for Ammo, for us and for sharing, Food, mail, and of course Movies.

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We could pull up next to a Navy vessel, in this case the USS Arlington, to take on supplies. Some times it included transferring of people.

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After taking on our supplies, we would return to the our positions off the coast of Vietnam.

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I wanted to send Thanks to all of the crews of these ships for being away from families and friends, to work together to help keep our freedom.

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The above was our traditional military warship returning from a WAR on January 22, 1968, fireboats and all.

To the Officers and Crew of the USCGC Halfmoon. Thank you. Job Well Done

HR Worthington – RM1


Grandfather’s Place of work in 1916

November 9, 2011

I attend many Genealogy Webinars, online, hosted by Legacy Family Tree. http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/Webinars.asp. I have learned much from attending these Webinar’s and want to thank Geoff Rasmussen for making these available.

Today, Thomas MacEntee, of http://hidefgen.com/ did a webinar today called: It Is Well With My Soul: Finding Ancestors Amid the Rubble of Disaster and Misfortune.

He was going through a list of resources for “other” places to look if the normal resources don’t provide the information that you want. One very common website to visit in Cyndis List. A Great Website. But today he was very specific for Medical Disasters. I went to that website, http://www.cyndislist.com/medical/hospitals/ and found the Sanatorium where my grandfather Worthington managed the farm for Dr. Miller.

I have been looking for the Name of it, as I knew the name Dr. Miller.

NEWBURGH:  Newburgh Tuberculosis Sanatorium. Est'd 1910.  
Capacity.35.Private. Med. Staff. Supt. R.A.Miller, M.D.
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The above picture is all that was left of this Sanatorium in September 2003 when I took my parents to where my Dad was taken when he was 1 week old.

My grandfather moved there after he was married on 17 June 1915. So the Sanatorium had been around for 5 years. My grandparents, and my Dad returned to West Chester on Armistice Day.

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I have a letter written by my Great  Aunt Anna (my grandmother’s sister) who helped my grandmother take my Dad, by train, from Philadelphia to Brewster, NY and this farm.

Don’t know much about this place, but at least I now have the Name of Dr. Millers Sanatorium.


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