A Find-A-Grave Experience

June 24, 2013

I am not sure how I feel about this:

On Thursday, I am going to Arlington National Cemetery for the burial of my uncle, Americus Lamberti (1917 – 2012). We knew he was going to be buried there, just not when. We have been in contact with Arlington and the funeral home. On Saturday, we received a call from the funeral home and checked the Arlington National Cemetery website to get the information that we knew would be posted there.

I decided to go to my uncles file in my genealogy database program and there was a shaky leaf. Now I know I haven’t followed all of them, and hadn’t looked at Uncle Max’s profile for a while. The first HINT, from Ancestry, was to their index to Find-A-Grave.

It looks like the funeral home created the memorial in Find-A-Grave 2 days after my uncle died.

Find-A-Grave Memorial #10230107

Since I have been to the twin’s plot, took pictures, I checked to see if I have posted the pictures on Find-A-Grave. I had not. Took care of one of the twins and I realized that the second twin was not listed. Took care of that, with a picture. Will post a picture of Uncle Max after the service on Thursday.

I have seen conversations, in blogs and online, about how quickly information is posted on Find-A-Grave. I now “get it” and what that means. His obituary was online, on Find-A-Grave 2 days after he died, a memorial was created on Find-A-Grave, but he won’t be buried for 4 more days. Also, it was picked up by Ancestry.com and I had a shaky leaf.

Now if some of our other ancestors would show up that fast.


Result of the use of WikiTree to gather information

April 9, 2013

I did a series of blog posts on the use of WikiTree to gather information from the “facebook” generation.


My goal was to gather family information about some nieces and nephews that I had lost contact with, so that I could generate a book and/or chart for my Aunt, my Dads younger sister.

What I had noticed, is that these nieces and nephews and their children were “online” on Facebook. So, how to gather their information for me to add to my genealogy database. Online … hmmmm … Oh yeah, there is WikiTree. http://www.wikitree.com/

I provided instructions to the upper right of my blog, on how I wanted “them” to use WikiTree, because I want that tree to be completely private as I was gathering information on living people, including a couple of babies.

Well, it worked. I had great help from a couple of cousins to pull this together and hope that I can get a couple of other cousins to help me fill out their “lines”.

I sent my data along to Family Chartmasters and my friend “the Chart Chick” Janet Hovorka, and the Family Chartmasters generated a beautiful Descendant Chart that I gave to my aunt. Now, when her great-grandchildren come to visit her, they can see that chart, find their name then listen to my Aunt tell her stories. And she has a bunch of great stories.

Item for my ToDo list: Take my digital recorder with me the next time I go to visit.

Here is that chart:



The Whitall House

September 17, 2012

I have been following a Blog, Historic Places in South Jersey, for some time and have been in contact with the Blogger. Afterall, she is a docent at my 5th Great Grandparents home. Yesterday, Sunday, I noticed this entry.


Gee, a Genealogy Day at the Whitall House.


Quickly had Patti text to Carrie, to let her know what I was doing, showered, and out the door in record time. Once again, I am reminded how nice it is go live within 4 or 5 hours from where my ancestors lived. This one is about 1 1/2 hours away.

My first item on the agenda was to meet my blogger buddy. Found her in the “hospital”.


Finally, got to meet her in person. Way cool.

Carrie arrived, and the fun began. We went back to the “hospital” and introduced Carrie to the “nurse”.

This room was presenting what the room may have looked like, during the battle that took place at Fort Mercer, right next door. Ann Cooper Whitall opened the house to “both sides”. This, as I understand it, would not allow Carrie to join the DAR, due to recent activities that took Ann Cooper Whitall from being a Patriot, as she took in both the both sides of the war.


In the next room, we would meet “new cousins”. A gentleman and HIS daughter, for the same reason, visiting our Ancestors home.


We are in the “front room” with the “hospital” behind us. We would spend the next hour or so, walking through the Whitall House, sharing stories.

More photos can be seen here:


Now to begin our journey in sharing our research and see how we are related. We are descendants of James (1716-1797) and Ann Cooper Whitall (1717-1808).

One item of interest, is that Ann Cooper Whitall kept a Diary and it was on display.


More information on this historic place can be found here>


What a great day !!!

Special Orders #191, the Lost Orders

September 10, 2012

A month or so ago, I posted this: 

Planned Weekend Trip – Day 1

It was a day trip, for me, to be in Frederick, Maryland to hear more about Special Orders #191. I went and had a great time. I learned a lot, not only about what happened to the Lost Orders, but why it was important to the Civil War.

The National Park Service, just posted a YouTube Video about Special Order #191

Special Orders 191


There was a lecture on the topic, and a panel discussion by three Civil War Historians. In attendance were descendants of the two gentlemen who discovered these orders.

I won’t go into the details, but what is important to me, and why I spend the day driving, was that the Monocacy National Battlefield has, within it’s borders a Worthington House.

I got to see the actual paper that these orders were written on, as seen in the video and are on display at the battlefield, but to be WHERE they were found. Or at least the area. That was close enough for me.


What I learned from that visit, was not so much about the orders themselves, but more about what I learned from the Inferential Genealogy study that I did “in Second Life”. You may recall I mentioned two people, at the Battle of Gettysburg, who fought against each other and that their Grandfathers fought with George Washington. Brother against Brother took on a new, real, meaning for me.

Author Dennis E. Frye, September Suspense, Lincoln’s Union in Peril” was the presenter and was on the panel, described Frederick, Maryland during the time of the Civil War. What surprised me, was that Frederick was “Union” friendly. Knowing that Baltimore was 50 miles (plus or minus) away, but was a “split town”, as was Maryland, split between the North and South. The study I did was on Confederate’s during the Civil War. Why were towns, so close together in my mind, so far apart at the time of the Civil War.

I had a chance to ask Mr. Frye about this. What he explained to me, was that the settlers of Frederick were Welsh and had come down to this part of Maryland from the port of Philadelphia and not the port of Baltimore. Knowing the Philadelphia area, and a bit of it’s history, that all made sense to me. Having just driven from northern New Jersey to Frederick that morning, it made total sense.

The lecture was fantastic. He told the STORY of Special Orders #191, “including citations”. Of course a Historian would have citations, but the reading of the articles he quoted helped put the “story” into a real place. His book has 23 pages of End Notes, and 6 pages of Bibliographical information.

The Panel included two other Civil War historians. The moderator took questions from the audience and asked the panel, in turn, to answer the questions. That is when the discussion became interesting, as each historian, had their own interpretation of the data from their studies.

Fort McHenry, Maryland

August 10, 2012

Last weekend’s “day trip” became two Day Trips. Unfortunately, Patti was not up to the trip, but we agreed that I would make the trip to Frederick, Maryland and the celebration of Special Orders 191 (will blog later on that). Our plan was to spend the night, visit Worthington Valley, then proceed to the Worthington Reunion. (already blogged about that).

It was hot, but there was time.

Since doing my research last summer (Inferential Genealogy), I wanted to Visit Fort McHenry.



The Howard family played a role at Fort McHenry early in the Civil War. While doing that research I realized that Frances Scott Key was in my family file. I had known of other Worthington / Key interactions in the past. There is a house in Anne Arundel County that belonged to Key and Worthington. (but that’s another story).

As you may be able to tell from the above picture, that is was a beautiful day. Fort McHenry has programs in the evenings on the weekends, War of 1812 Twilight Tattoo. Why not …. it gave me a chance to re-visit the Fort, as it’s been a number of years since I last was there AND had no pictures. Great day to visit and to that Pictures.

As may have been a tradition at Fort McHenry, in the evening, there was a gathering of the troops (Tattoo), and as was presented this evening, a band was there, along with the local “ladies”.


The Chesapeake Concert Band and the Fort McHenry Fife & Drum Corps played for those in attendance.


Period music was presented, including some music specifically created for Fort McHenry.



The Traditional Canon Salute was included in the ceremony.


So why all the fuss about Fort McHenry and Frances Scott Key? According to my database, he was the Father-in-law of my 10th Great Grand Uncle. What ??? OK, he’s distant, but still related. Looking at HOW we are related, I run into TWO, not one, but TWO Revolutionary War “Hero’s”. As reported on this Blog, John Eager Howard, grandfather of David Ridgely Howard and McHenry Howard, of Civil War fame, but also Ann Cooper Whitall, wife of James Whitall. (The Battle at Red Bank, New Jersey).

The Whitall House it across the Delaware River from Fort Mott. Another visit to the Whitall House is in order.

In this one line, I have Revolutionary War, War of 1812, and the Civil War hero’s.


More Photo’s can be found here:

US Coast Guard Anniversary

August 4, 2012

August 4, 2012, is the 222nd Anniversary of the start of the United States Coast Guard. I spend 4 years in the Coast Guard, 39 month’s of which was on the United States Coast Guard Cutter Halfmoon (WHEC-378).


This picture is of the Halfmoon returning from our tour in Vietnam, with normal Naval tradition of a naval vessel returning from a war.

While we were on our tour, on this day in 1967, off of Vietnam, we celebrated the anniversary.


Snoopy was our ‘mascot’ for our tour.

So, Happy Birthday to the United States Coast Guard and for All of the men and women who served our country.

Planned Weekend Trip – Day 3

August 3, 2012

We started at the Civil War National Battleground at Monocacy, just south of Frederick, Maryland, traveled a little east to the Worthington Valley in Baltimore County, and Montmorenci and on to a family reunion. As mentioned before, these first two stops are homes of a Captain John Worthington descendant. This next stop is where my Captain John descendant moved to from Annapolis Maryland.

Descendants of Capt John and Sarah Howard Worthington
Charles Worthington 1701 – 1774
John Worthington 1733 – 1803
Samuel Worthington 1785 – 1853
Henry Wilson Worthington 1815 – 1866

Charles, was born after Capt. John died, but moved to Harford County Maryland. Henry Wilson Worthington is my 2nd Great Grandfather.

The move was to Darlington, Maryland and were members of the Deer Creek Quaker Meeting. The best that I can determine, because of the second marriage of his mother, Sarah Howard Worthington to John Brice, Charles was influenced to return to being a Quaker, from his mother and step father’s tradition. Both the Brice and Howard families from what I have read were Quakers.

Deer Creek Meeting Sign

Deer Creek Quaker Meeting

We will join the family reunion at a near by State Park. I have not attended this reunion before, but apparently it is an annual event. I am excited to be able to meet up with some new “cousins”. I have no clue as to how much genealogy will be discussed, but I will be prepared with iPad, Camera, research material, some books that I have created and a digital recorder.

Although I have been to Deer Creek in the past, I have not spent a lot of time studying the area. It’s rumored that one of the Worthington houses in this area was / is haunted.

More to follow upon my return.

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