Revolutionary Challenge

March 7, 2013

In support of the Photo Detective, Maureen Taylor, and Verissima Productions, and the Legal Genealogist, Judy Russell, I would like to make you aware of this project, a film called Revolutionary Voices. As an introduction to the project, I ask that you visit Judy’s Blog, A Revolutionary challenge. There is more information about this project, including a short video by Maureen Taylor, and other details.

Kickstarter.com posted this update, so that you can see what has happened since March 1, 2013.

I have made a contribution to this very worthwhile project. Please note, that you too can join in by making a submission as noted below on your Revolutionary War connection.

Thank you.

 

Project Update #2: Week One Wrap-Up

Posted by Maureen Taylor & Verissima ProductionsLike

What a whirlwind week it’s been! We couldn’t be happier with the $11,266.00 in pledges we have so far. Don’t forget, we don’t get any of the money pledged until we’ve reached our full goal, so there’s still lots of work to do!

We had an amazing response to Judy Russell’s “Revolutionary Challenge” posted to her Legal Genealogist blog last week (http://www.legalgenealogist.com/blog/2013/03/02/my-own-last-muster/) as well as a great outpouring of support from social media and our direct email appeals.

But now the challenge really begins – many Kickstarter campaigns lose momentum after week one… let’s make sure to keep our pace strong! A second $10,000+ week would make a huge impact on the potential success of our campaign and our film. Here are two quick steps to help us make that a reality: 

1. Keep sharing – (so far, about 50% of our donors have come from sharing and social media efforts (http://infogr.am/The-Profile-of-a-Donor/). Please blog about us, tweet about us, write down the link and hand it out at your next historical society meeting– any and all kinds of networking will help us reach and surpass our goal! 

2. Tell your own Revolutionary Story. Do you have family ties to the revolutionary war? Are you a history buff with a great story or factoid? Do you own an artifact or photo that has a Revolutionary connection? Let us know! Anyone who has pledged to the campaign so far can send us a Kickstarter message or email (lastmusterfilm@gmail.com) that’s 1-3 sentences telling us about your ties to the Revolution. We’ll use Twitter & Facebook to highlight it as thanks for partnering with us to help make this campaign a success. Here’s your chance to show how far the roots of the Revolution spread! 

Thanks again for all of your financial and networking support! 

With Appreciation, 

The Revolutionary Voices team 

Fun Fact: Molly Ferris Akin’s story of bravery during the Revolution was oral history passed down in the family until a descendant wrote in down in 1984. You can start telling your own story now!

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Not Everything is Online

November 7, 2012

I am working on a “How to” search presentation for my local Family History Interest Group.

Hurricane Sandy caused the presentation to be rescheduled / postponed until the library could get it’s power back and that folks could get to it safely. There are still road closures, trees down, folks without power, even a week after the storm.

This extra time provided me with some more time to research my two “case studies” for this presentation. Two folks from the group sent me “problems”, to be used as examples for the “Group” to help search for solutions.

In the Inferential Genealogy program that I have discussed here, having a specific goal or question to answer was very important. Both of the ‘case studies’ have specific questions.

Leading up to my presentation, several presenters at previous meetings have reminded us about “not every thing is Online”; being patient with results, and YOU are an expert for your own family.

The first case study, which will be in presentation form, meaning I will present a couple of searching techniques that I use and that will be used for the 2nd “group” or “community” search case study.

Both of these examples will illustrate that “not everything is online”. But in different ways. The first is Civil War records and a Civil War Pension files. The information that is needed to order these files are online, but the details are not. The “how to order” forms are online.

The second case study will reinforce that, but in a different way. This 2nd case study will bring in the “family expert” that would go with the data that can be seen online. In working with the person who gave me the 2nd case study, I have found that there were relationships that aren’t found “online” but the “family expert” knows what the real relationships are. Just looking online, does not reflect two “step” relationships.

The good news, in working with these two case studies, where to “go next”, or what repository to visit “next” becomes obvious. This second case study, the crowd or community search will provide this second person with one or two repositories that should be visited, but with a list of items to look for at that repository.

In addition, the Friends, Acquaintance, and Neighbors (FAN) concept will be introduced, just based on the specific example / problem that was presented to me, and the importance looking broadly and not being focused on an individual. For example, who are the people on the census page before and after “your people”. Hints to resolve this 2nd “problem” became obvious is the resolution of the specific question for this case study.

Note: I am writing this as a reminder to my self, of a couple of points to be made during the presentation. Comments are always welcome.


Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – What’s Your Ancestral Name Number?

August 19, 2012

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun is a weekly challenge the Randy Seaver publishes to the Genealogy Community.

http://www.geneamusings.com/2012/08/saturday-night-genealogy-fun-whats-your.html

He opens the challenge this week with:

Hey ahnentafelists (new genea-word!) – it’s Saturday Night – time for more Genealogy Fun!!!

This challenge was also put out earlier this week in several places.

Crista Cowan, I think, started this topic:

http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/08/16/family-history-all-done-whats-your-number/

It was picked up by:

Julie Cahill Tarr

http://genblogjulie.blogspot.com/2012/08/whats-your-number-and-epiphany.html

and Judy G. Russell

http://www.legalgenealogist.com/blog/2012/08/18/more-lost-than-found/

and others, but OK, I’ll bite. How am I doing?

 

Generation

Number

Found

Percentage

Generation 1 1 1 100%
Generation 2 2 2 100%
Generation 3 4 4 100%
Generation 4 8 8 100%
Generation 5 16 16 100%
Generation 6 32 26 81%
Generation 7 64 39 61%
Generation 8 128 51 40%
Generation 9 256 60 23%
Generation 10 512 57 11%
Total 1,023 264 25%

 

Wow, not to bad, but have lot’s to find. I am hoping that by the end of the year, I can fill out some more of my Worthington ancestors as a DNA and Family History Society helps to clarify my line in the U.K. I have the data, but it’s a matter of reviewing what has been provided, and get some of the documentation. My Captain John Worthington (1650 – 1701) line gets a little fuzzy and am not ready to put what I have into my file. My 6th generation “brick wall” is on my maternal grandmother’s family. This may require a trip to Sussex, New Brunswick, Canada as I haven’t found good evidence online (yet).

So, I’m good for 5 Generations but need to fill in some more blanks.

Having said that, the most interesting piece of this “hobby” is finding the stories of these people, AND their impact that they had to their community. Finding out the hero’s what hang out this this tree. Can you say “computer bug”, how about “Baseball Hall of Fame”, did I mention the “Stars Spangled Banner”, first female Vestry person in her Church? Not to mention Fire Chief, Butcher, no candle stick maker (yet). Of course many Bakers, light house keepers, school teachers, Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Civil War, World War I, World War II and Vietnam war hero’s.


Another Link to the War of 1812

July 3, 2012

While aboard the Pride of Baltimore II earlier this week, I was reminded of an event that took place in the harbor of Baltimore in the War of 1812. Hadn’t really “connected the dots” between this was and a distant relative.

IMG_5246

This is the type of flag that a ship like the Pride of Baltimore might have flown during the War of 1812.

Last summer, I was researching one “Ridgely Howard” using the Inferential Genealogy of family research. Later in my research, Ridgely Howard was really David Ridgely Howard.

His grandfather, John Edger Howard (1752-1827) and his wife Margret Chew (1760-1824) had a number of children, one of which was James Howard, Ridgely’s father and Charles Howard. Charles had 10 children, one of which was also Charles. This Charles married Elizabeth Phebe Key. She was the daughter of Frances Scott Key (1779-1843).

OK, it’s a stretch, but Frances Scott Key is the “Father-in-Law to my 10th Great Grand Uncle”


Montmorenci–Marie Conrad Lehr

June 17, 2012

Marie Conrad Lehr (1884-1921), was an owner of Montmorenci into the 1900’s, but is a Worthington Descendant. Found this newspaper article on her death:

BaltimoreSun-1921-06-07-Lehr_MarieConrad

Transcribed:

Baltimore Sun
June 7, 1921
Mortuary Notice

FUNERAL OF MRS LEHR TODAY

Body Placed In Memorial Chapel She Built Recently

Funeral services will be held at 4:30 o’clock this afternoon in Emmanuel Protestant Episcopal Church for Mrs. Marie Conrad Lehr, wife of Dr. Louis Charles Lehr, who died early yesterday of pneumonia at the home of the Misses Sally and Polly Carter, Washington Apartments. With a simple service, conducted by the Rev. Dr. Hugh Brickhead, the body was taken yesterday from the apartment and placed in the Memorial Chapel in Emmanuel Church that Mrs. Lehr built recently in memory of her mother, Mrs. Lawrence Lewis Conrad. Following the services in the church today the body will be taken to Montmorenci and interred in the old-family burying ground tomorrow.

Mrs. Lehr was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Lewis Conrad. Her mother was Miss Sally Howard Worthington, of Montmorenci, in Worthington Valley. On the paternal side Mrs. Lehr was a direct descendent of Nellie Curtis, daughter of Martha Washington. On November 9, 1909, Mrs. Lehr married Dr. Lehr, son of the late Robert Lehr, who died in 1887. The ceremony was performed at the Hotel Belvedere by the late Cardinal Gibbons, assisted by the late Rev. Francis X. Brady, president of Loyola College.

During the war Dr. Lehr served in France and Mrs. Lehr worked under Miss Anne Morgan on the committee for reconstruction work in France.

End:

June 7, 1921 Mortuary Notice for Marie Conrad Lehr, Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland.  Genealogy Bank.

There are a number of follow up items, on my ToDo list, about her and I know there are other newspaper articles, and another visit to Baltimore will need to be scheduled.

She isn’t the first one to have a note about being buried in “the old-family burying ground”. I have other notes, indicating that some have been moved from this burial ground to Saint John’s Episcopal Church Cemetery. Will have to see if she was one of those who was moved.

Of interest, is the notation what she is a descendant of Nellie Curtis, daughter of Martha Washington.

Lesson Learned: The study of this house, continues to show the impact of the people in this house to their neighborhood. Based on this article, once again there appears to be an impact on the Episcopal Church in the area. I suspect that this will be more obvious as time goes on.


Montmorenci–Samuel Worthington, Jr

June 16, 2012

Samuel Worthington, Jr – 1776 – 1811

 

clip_image001

Mortuary Notice : December 12, 1811, Page 3, Column 2. Samuel Worthington – 1776 – 1811, Federal Gazette, Baltimore, Maryland.  Genealogy Bank.

Samuel Worthington Jr, Son of Samuel Worthington (1734 – 1815) and Mary Tolley Worthington (1740 – 1777) was born 23 Sep 1776 in Worthington Valley, Baltimore County, Maryland.

May have been buried at Montmorenci initially, be later moved to Saint Johns Episcopal Church Cemetery, Reisterstown (Worthington Valley).

PA080032


House History

June 15, 2012

Last evening, there was a presentation at the Second Life Association of Professional Genealogist (SL-APG) by mayrumblepois.

SL_HouseHistories_001

May, is her Second Life name, and I will refer to her by that name. I can only say that she IS the House Historian.

Her presentation was about her passion in this line of research. She explained that WE, those around the “Fire Pit” (as seen above) have the skills to also be House Historians. The skills are very much the same, the types of records might be the same, but what we are looking for is not about People, but the physical house.

The biggest difference is audience, and WHERE the research is done. “May” reminded us that her research is very local. No travel, no conferences, and it’s not ‘family’ who will receive any questions or reports based on the information gathered.

I have talked to “May” in RL (Real Life) about this, and shared a story with her about a project that I had done in 2007. It was on a House, a historical one at that, and a bit of the journey that I had in a presentation that I had done on that house. I have blogged about “Montmorenci” in the past, have a continuing search for the reason for a “staircase” that is in the Maryland Montmorenci, and the discovery of another Montmorenci Staircase. That search continues, as well as some contact, based on this blog, about family members from “the other” Montmorenci. What contact was within the past month or so. The search continues.

I re-looked at a book that I created, in 2007, and gave to the owners at that time, to see what it would take to really do a House History on that house, based on the presentation last night.

I have notes that track the owners of that house, from the beginning, through 2007, I have notes from the surrounding area and the impact of the families who owned that house to that area (History of the area), so I might have the beginning of a House History for this specific house. In addition, the notion of researching in a “local” area, might not be true, in this case, but it would mean a visit to one or two repositories to gather the “missing” information that might be important for the history of the house, rather then the family history of the families who lived there.

During the presentation, that some of these houses do have “stories” of their own. Some to be told, others, maybe not. While I have been “Looking for ….” Montmorenci, I have one of those stories. In researching that mystery, I saw a number of other stories of events that took place in that house, so I know the information is “out there”.

Once again, May, “the House Historian”, I may be up to your challenge. I will blog about it here.

Montmorenci 3


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