News at 11: Just found out that my “brick wall” may now be a ” black sheep”

October 10, 2013

Don’t you like the Questions and Answer sessions where someone asks a question and the person responding says

So.. blah, blah, blah. Drives me crazy.

So, I get this email response to a question about the Worthington Family History Society DNA Project. Of the group who were tested, 36, I was in a group of 4. The four of use all are in the US, and close to our common ancestors home. In fact, one lives in the SAME TOWN as our 6th Great Grandfather.

Not long ago, I made this Blog Post: New Thoughts on “Brick Walls”. I still think that is true. When I started to do my Family Research I kept running into information that just didn’t look right. When I tried to “cross the pond” there was conflicting information, names and dates that didn’t make any sense. So, I stopped.

Not that long also, I posted a message for a trial “peer review” and one comment was that you don’t have Negative Evidence but Negative Findings. Thank you Elizabeth Shown Mills of EvidenceExplained.com fame and author of a book by the same name.

Also, I learned a lot while we did the Mastering Genealogical Proof a book by Dr. Thomas W Jones where we learned how to work with the Genealogical Proof Standard. I have blogged about that, and won’t talk about it here now.

I changed my thought process about the term BRICK WALL.

I had stopped for 10+ years about trying to find Who were the Parents of Capt John Worthington (1650 – 1701).

At least i have a specific Question to answer. Didn’t even know about that until a couple of months ago, thanks to Dr Jones. I followed a Shaky Leaf and actually saw a Baptismal Record from the early 1600’s in the right location. Wow, I can start to look for Capt John. But life got in the way. I have been working with a lot of data from the Worthington Family History Society 17th Century Project where a team of Worthington researchers at look at gathering, verifying information and creating 17th Century Pedigree Views.

I am still not making a connection. One of my US based cousins put together a very credible view of the ancestry of Capt John. Resolved conflicting information after putting his research together, lots of great documentation. However, some of his conclusions were part of what I had looked at a very long time ago. I wasn’t uncomfortable with what his conclusion was as there was nothing to argue about. Totally credible information.

Every once in a while, I would check the FamilyTreeDNA project status. No change: Y-DNA Haplagroup numbers:

  • Haplagroup E – 2 people
  • Haplagroup G – 1 person
  • Haplagroup I – 13 people
  • Haplagroup R1b1b2 – 16 people
  • Haplagroup J2 – 4

J2 is what my results are. All 4 are in the vicinity of Maryland.

So, I sent an email to the Worthington Family History Society for a Status Update on the Larger Project hoping the someone from the United Kingdom had been or will be tested. Hoping someone from across the pond would be  a J2. No such luck.

Just as I was loading the car for a 3 hour drive to Baltimore, I did a quick, final check of my Email. A RE: (reply) to my email question. OK, here comes the answer, gotta read it.

As I read it, I see:

 If a distant relative cannot be found to confirm this there are two possibilities: one, that your line is from a founding family in the 14th century and we have not discovered a matching line or two, that you should match another known W(orthington) line but that there has been “Non Paternal Event” (illegitimacy, adoption etc) sometime before Capt John resulting in a different Haplagroup.

So, my “brick wall” may have become a Black Sheep. OK, that sort of backs up my earlier concern about the relationships that I had seen early on; the stuff that didn’t quite make sense to me.

Elizabeth Shown Mills was right, I haven’t looked in the right place. But thinking about what Dr Jones brought up, maybe I haven’t asked the Right Question.

Driving down all of the information that I could remember was running through my mind. What did I miss? What do I want to go back to look at again. I thought about the term FAN Club (Family, Acquaintance, and Neighbors). (Wish I could note who presented us with that term). I have followed some of the FAN Club, but who did I not look at close enough?

I am going to re-look at the FAN club and change my research Question. I have a couple of thoughts on both. I have had a couple of Why questions that have been around from the beginning.

It would appear that today’s DNA Technology may disprove a number of conclusions that I have seen all over, if these DNA results are right.

Off to go chase a Sheep


Mastering Genealogical Proof–Find-A-Grave

July 22, 2013

There was going to be a discussion about how to cite a Find-A-Grave entry in the Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group on 21 July 2013, but the time ran out. This is not a homework assignment for Chapter 4, but merely how I handle this topic.

Since Ancestry.com is now indexing the Find-A-Grave website, I have had some success if search results leading me to a link on Ancestry.com. The results look like this:

FaG-Worthington_HenryRussellJr

The name has been blanked out, but those are the details from Ancestry.com. They provide a link to “Go to website

There is a lot of discussion about the use of an “Index” or to Cite and index. What I have learned from this study of Mastering Genealogical Proof is that we should not use an index in a proof document. I totally agree with that. That said, it does not tell me that I should cite that, as a source in my genealogy datebase management software. I have chosen to do that and here is the format of my Citation, as created with the use of a Template in my program.

For this purpose, I have chosen to use an Online Database; Cemetery Derivative template, the result is:

Ancestry.com Web, “New Jersey, Find A Grave Index, 1664-2011″, database, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com) Database online; accessed 20 Sep 2012. Index for Henry Russell Worthington, Jr.

Following the link from Ancestry to Find-A-Grave, or since I created the memorial on Find-A-Grave, with my photograph, I want to cite that as well. Here is a link to that memorial page: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=49480185

Information from that web page is entered into my database, with the following Citation:

Russ Worthington, “Find-A-Grave”, database, Find A Grave (www.findagrave.com) Henry Russell Worthington (1916-2006) – Find A Grave Memorial# 49480185; accessed 03/08/2010.

That is using the same Template as the one from Ancestry.com. Perhaps the memorial number is not important here, but knowing the memorial number on the Find-A-Grave website, makes searching for, or getting directly to that memorial page easier. It’s a search field on the Find-A-Grave website.

What about the photograph that is there? In this case, it’s mine and I could publish it in my Ancestry Member Tree, online at Ancestry.com. However, I have a policy for all of my Find-A-Grave photographs to mark them private in my genealogy database, so they will NOT appear in my Ancestry Member Tree. I can see it locally in my database, but not online.


Query: Ruth Elizabeth Worthington

April 28, 2013
A Query from Keisha Foulke
Submitted on 2013/04/28 at 5:34 am 

Hello, this is an old thread so I have no clue if any of you will respond, however I’m back tracking my grand mother Ruth Elizabeth Worthington’s family heritage. Apparently we have Native American in our blood thanks to a possibly a descendant of Virginia, a general as my dad heard. But now most of all the Worthington relatives are dead from the side of the Native American blood. I’m not sure if any of you guys know anything about it but email me keishafoulke@gmail.comif you have a clue, thanks.


Day One–Searching in Lancashire, England

April 26, 2013

I posted Where do I Start? and thought I would follow up on that post.

Actually, the report really helped. I stayed focused on that list and did an online search at Ancestry.com. I worked on the first 16 people on my list (males), and actually found 4 records in an Anglican Parish. So, my early guesses were close.

Of interest, one of the results gave me conflicting information. Below is the image in question.

17th-Century-WorthingtonEdward-M7

Anglican Parish Registers (Lancashire, England), Lancashire, England, Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials (1573-1812), Burial Record for Edward Worthington, buried 08 May 1629, image 259, accessed 25 Apr 2013; digital images, Ancestry.com.

The conflict is that there are two people, in the Pedigree Chart, Edward Worthington, and the chart said that they died “1629”. So, which Edward Worthington is this record for?

I am guessing that solely looking at Church Records may present miss leading information. Without any indication of relationships or other information, may lead us to incorrect conclusions.

What I did was to enter the SAME record to both people, with a citation, but marked a To Do List task, to resolve this conflict.  I also send an email to the project coordinator for additional help, as they have information that I do not have.

Bottom line here, the GenDective report has been very helpful.


Where do I Start?

April 24, 2013

Continuing my research for this “ancient” family line, where should I start to look?

The first record that I found was a marriage record in an Anglican Parish in Manchester, Lancashire, England. The Record group covered 1573-1812. Perhaps there are other records that I might find there, since the collection was for Baptism, Marriage, and Burial’s from that parish.

Back to GenDective­™. In GenDective Reporter, there is a listing for “Which reports help with my research efforts?” That sounds like what I am looking for.

 

GD-WhichReport-1

Clicking on the “+” sign, I see a report that might be helpful. Families who lived in state.

I selected ALL “Degree of family kinship”, Country is England, and State, territory or region, I selected Lancashire and clicked on Generate Report.

 

GD-WhichReport-2

This generated a report of 30 people who had an event in Lancashire. Looking at the report, which included Dates, I might find any one or all of them in that area of England.

GD-WhichReport-3

So far, with that first “hint” there have been not helpful hints. Because I have so few dates, the hints are not “my person”. So back to Ancestry.com AND FamilySearch.org, as they have Church Records from that area in that time frame. But, at least I can focus on this group of people (30).


Marriage Record for George Worthington and Elizabeth Sandiford 11 Jun 1663

April 15, 2013

From a hint, on Ancestry.com, I found a marriage record for George Worthington and Elizabeth Sandiford and their marriage of 11 jun 1663 in Manchester, St Mary, St Denys and St George, Lancashire England.  All I started with was that George had died between 1669 and 1670. Elizabeth (Sandiford) Worthington was still living in 1669 and that they had been married about 1663. That hint took me to the IMAGE of that record.

FB2-Worthington_George-Marriage Image 1

 

Here they are on 11 June 1663

FB2-Worthington_George-Marriage Image 2

 

Never thought I would see these documents from England. Thank you Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com, Manchester, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1573-1812 (Cathedral) (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013), http://www.ancestry.com, Database online.

More on this project later.


Result of the use of WikiTree to gather information

April 9, 2013

I did a series of blog posts on the use of WikiTree to gather information from the “facebook” generation.

http://worthy2be.wordpress.com/tag/wiki-tree/

My goal was to gather family information about some nieces and nephews that I had lost contact with, so that I could generate a book and/or chart for my Aunt, my Dads younger sister.

What I had noticed, is that these nieces and nephews and their children were “online” on Facebook. So, how to gather their information for me to add to my genealogy database. Online … hmmmm … Oh yeah, there is WikiTree. http://www.wikitree.com/

I provided instructions to the upper right of my blog, on how I wanted “them” to use WikiTree, because I want that tree to be completely private as I was gathering information on living people, including a couple of babies.

Well, it worked. I had great help from a couple of cousins to pull this together and hope that I can get a couple of other cousins to help me fill out their “lines”.

I sent my data along to Family Chartmasters and my friend “the Chart Chick” Janet Hovorka, and the Family Chartmasters generated a beautiful Descendant Chart that I gave to my aunt. Now, when her great-grandchildren come to visit her, they can see that chart, find their name then listen to my Aunt tell her stories. And she has a bunch of great stories.

Item for my ToDo list: Take my digital recorder with me the next time I go to visit.

Here is that chart:

IMG_8301

IMG_8302


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