Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Connections

October 2, 2011

I must say, that I haven’t posted all of my findings on this project. I am really trying to stay focused on the Methodology that Dr. Jones has presented. Going through all of the pictures from yesterday, I thought that I would show one of my findings.

Driving around Baltimore, “in search of …. “ the Howards, I saw a new monument about a block from one of the houses that I found.

This house is 901 St Paul Street. McHenry Howard and household in the 1920 Census. Up the street, within the block was another residence of this household in previous census records. There is a historical marker, which I couldn’t get close enough to, said that this was the home of Samuel Shoemaker (another mystery). But, there it is. St. Paul Street carries the name of an Episcopal Church not to far away.

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Behind me, as I took this picture a block or two was a statue of John Eager Howard (1752-1827). Within a block or two was Eager Street.  Like many folks I have run across in this project, he has a story.

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Here is a picture of the Statue.

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Speaking of Episcopal Churches:

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I could not get a good enough position to take a picture of the church itself, but I will visit one day when I can get it. Mentioned in a previous Blog post, Worthington’s were at this church, moved out to St. Thomas Garrison Forrest, then to Worthington Valley. But, I digress.

Back to John Eager Howard.

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If you read this sign: this lot was proved by Col. John Eager Howard.

Why all of the interest in this little side trip, away from David Ridgely Howard? I peeked at my own database and guess who I found. John Eager Howard. His wife is my 3rd Cousin, 6 times removed. That linkage, may hold the clue to David Ridgely Howard.

I have often heard, “look sideways”. This to me is one of those glances sideways. I have David Ridgeley Howards’ names, but can’t get the previous generation.

It is obvious to me, that the folks that I have found, for this project, were known and had an impact on Baltimore. Many of the surnames I have mentioned thus far are street names within blocks of where these pictures were taken.

Lesson Learned: Had I only known what I would be doing when I retired, I would have “walked the streets” when I worked in Baltimore. These places are all within walking distance of my job.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Names

October 2, 2011

After taking a quick glance of about 200 photos from yesterday, I am almost confused.

It’s all about names, right?

This project started when I watched the PBS series Gettysburg. I heard the name Ridgely Howard. In my research in my own family both of these names are surnames. As I started the research Ridgely was his middle name.

No problem, been there, done that. I go by my middle name. Simple reason, I am a “III” (3rd), and there were three generations living on a small family farm. My grandfather went by his middle name, the Surname of a Grandfather, my Dad by his first name, and I was called the same way my grandfather was. This worked and still works, although my Dad has passed away. To clear the confusion about who you were talking to. Grandfather, Father, on me.

So, we now have David Ridgely Howard. (there’s a twist, a common first name for a Surname). “My” Howards were in Virginia, soon there after into Maryland. So, Howard, to me, as a Surname is OK. Got that.

Looking at Census Records, for the Howards, McHenry as a Middle name was appearing, and a First Name. Good thing I didn’t jump to any conclusions here. Could that Census Record have recorded McHenry, like Ridgely as the first name?

The biggest problem at this point is the names of member of the Households. For example, McHenry Howard and James McHenry Howard households had similar members of the household, living in close proximity of each other. At this point, it’s pretty clear that they are not the same family (yet).

The cemetery visits may have also separated the families (house holds) as well. Two different cemeteries, different parts of town. BUT, it may be a common Church. Working on that.

So, I looked at my pictures from the 3rd cemetery and I run into the same issue. My brain had told me that I had taken pictures of Howard headstones and McHenry headstones. Both of which were true and I clearly remembers one of the Howard children as Julianna Howard. So I took a bunch of pictures of the plot (10 – 15 stones).

Her stone was Julianna Howard McHenry, whose father was James Howard McHenry. The dates for Julianna were not right.

I have been putting off looking at the history of Fort McHenry, also in Baltimore.

A couple of years ago, while visiting my brother-in-law in a Veterans Hospital in Baltimore, we went to a historic cemetery that was next to where I had parked the car. In my search for the 1st cemetery, where “Betty Lou” was giving me a fit, you know “recalculating”, I saw an old cemetery, then realized it was the same one we had visited a couple of years earlier.

My car has a bumper sticker “I stop at cemeteries”, so I did. Went in where Edgar Allen Poe is buried, but so is James McHenry, of Fort McHenry fame.

So how does James McHenry Howard, James Howard McHenry, McHenry Howard related to David Ridgely Howard?

What did I learn from this: Where did THAT Name come from? Naming patterns ….


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Why Read Wills

September 28, 2011

Here is another example of Expanding your research. I have, sort-a, read Wills in the past. They were interesting, but don’t normally read and record what I find in them.

This project reminded me of why I should read wills.

Doing a generic Google search for Charles Ridgely, believed to be a brother of David Ridgely OR the father of another Ridgely, I came across a link to the Maryland State Archives for “a” Charles Ridgely. The search results were “in the ball park” for what I was looking for. But, check the wording in the Will:

Quote:

Charles Ridgely of Hampton (1760-1829)
MSA SC 3520-1446

Governor of Maryland, 1816-1819 (Federalist)

December 6, 1760 in Baltimore as Charles Ridgely Carnan.  His uncle, Captain Charles Ridgely, willed his estate to him on the condition that he assume the name Charles Ridgely; he did so legally in 1790.  He was also known as Charles Ridgely of Hampton.

End Quote:

[ This information resource of the Maryland State Archives is presented here for fair use in the public domain. When this material is used, in whole or in part, proper citation and credit must be attributed to the Maryland State Archives. PLEASE NOTE: Rights assessment for associated source material is the responsibility of the user. ]

© Copyright March 31, 2011Maryland State Archives

It turned out that Carnan surname shows up in this line, so now I know “where that name came from”.

Learning: Read Wills


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Attend Webinars

September 27, 2011

Expanding our research is one of the ways we can find information to help us ready our goal in the process.

I attend Webinars frequently especially those that are presented or have Genea-Bloggers presenting about the topic of Genealogy. You never know what you might find while attending a webinar.

This evening I attended “DearMYRTLE’s A FEW GOOD SITES Workshop Webinar”. She was showing the participants various websites where we can do research.

She showed about 70 listeners a number of websites that she uses to pint out what you might find on each.

When Ancestry.com was brought up, she shared no only what you might find on this website, but then she opened up her Ancestry Member Tree. Please understand that she and I already have hints that we are related but haven’t spent a lot of time talking about it. We have done shared Webinars and other presentations, online, but her example, right there online, in the Webinar, the exact family line that I had been working on, figuring out relationships, the previous night. Just on her screen, in the webinar, were probably 10 of the same names that I was working on.

As she was presenting, I emailed her several pictures of the Church where that group of people attended.

We will continue to put the pieces together and it may be that in her records, SHE holds the key to help me reach the secondary goal of finding out who David Ridgely Howards grandfather was. I think his name was on that screen that she shared.

Here is a link to her Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com

Thanks DearMYRTLE and don’t forget to check into see what are up coming Webinars on this website: http://blog.geneawebinars.com/

 

GeneaWebinars1


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–We’re Getting Close

September 25, 2011

Not connected all of the dot’s, but we are getting close. Remembering the David Ridgely Howard has two of my family surnames, Ridgely and Howard. Working my way back to the Revolutionary War ancestor of “Ridgely” I found the connection between the Howards and the Ridgely with a Ridgely, Col Henry Ridgely, Jr (1635 – 1710) buried in the same burial ground of my ancestor, Capt John Worthington (1607 – 1701). It is in the Saint Anne’s Burial Ground in Annapolis, Maryland.

I am not looking into my own family file, yet, but I think I am going to find at least one connection between David Ridgely Howard and Sarah Howard, Capt John’s wife.

But, I think there are other connections, as there are several other Surnames that I have found, along the way, that also link into my family file.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Search Broadly #4

June 26, 2011

In preparation for a trip to the National Civil War Museum, in hopes of finding information on D. Ridgely Howard, I did another Google Search for him.

What I stumbled upon was an online Family Tree. It was a great website and Family Tree. I don’t normally look at this type of information, nor record information from them and put into my tree. Most times, the information provided does not contain Source material. It is usually just Names and some times relationships.

Since this step is to Search Broadly, I spent a little time looking at what was on the website. Not only did I find my D. Ridgely Howard, but a Family Group Sheet on his family. Looking at the Surnames on this website, it would be very hard to miss the relationships in this online tree and my own family tree.

Looking at the Ancestors of D. Ridgely Howard, there wasn’t a connection back to my Sarah Howard (6th Great-Grandmother), but there were enough Howards that matched mine. (close but no winner)

Looking at the Family Group Sheet and the Census information that was mentioned here:

Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Search Broadly #3

June 7, 2011

the Household was in the Family Group Sheet. So, they MAY BE the right Family Group. But, are there other clues in either the Census Record or this Family Group Sheet.

Two hints, actually appeared. 1) James Howard, the head of household, according to the Family Group Sheet was married twice. 2) D. (now David) Ridgely Howard’s mother was listed as Margaret Oswald CHEW.

James Howard’s other wife (dates or order of marriage not listed) was Sophia Gough RIDGELY. So, that may be a hint for D. (David)’s middle name.

But, David’s mother, Margaret Oswald Chew WAS in my file as my 3rd Cousin 6 times removed, making David Ridgely Howard my 4th Cousin 5 times removed. I haven’t yet proven any of this, so he is not in my file, but I am encouraged to continue this research

Looking at this online tree a little further, besides many names that I know, I found my 6th Great-Grandfather. There was a Descendancy Report feature for my Capt. John Worthington, and many of his children had 6 or 7 generations of descendants, most of which I know and are in my file. However, his youngest son, my 5th Great-Grandfather did not have any descendants, only one of his two wives.

So, by Searching Broadly, found some more hints to follow up on BUT it indicates to me, that I might be on the right track.

I’ll post a follow up on the only SOURCE that was listed for D. Ridgely Howard and the Civil War.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Search Broadly #2

June 6, 2011

The History Channel had a program on Gettysburg. Ridgely Howard, of Baltimore, Maryland was mentioned as part of the Maryland Battalion. His father served in the Revolutionary War and served with George Washington

“His father served in the Revolutionary War” statement has been of concern to me. The time frame doesn’t match up.

So, I returned to my genealogy database, as I knew I had some Revolutionary War veterans in there somewhere.

I looked at my Howard’s, specifically Of the 8 male Howard’s, I found 3 of them married a Ridgely. Did I miss something in my first glance at my file?

Joseph Howard married Rachael Ridgely, but Joseph died in 1777.

Brice Howard married Anne Ridgely, but Brice died in 1799.

Thomas Cornelius Howard married Eleanor Ridgely, but he died in 1801

All three were sons of Cornelius Howard and Rachael Ridgely Worthington.

Note: Naming pattern.

Note: A Worthington, Ridgely, Howard connection.

Brice Howard was a Captain of the Anne Arundel Militia in 1776

Thomas Cornelius was an Ensign in Captain Brice Howard’s Company

Henry C. Paden, Jr., Revolutionary Patriots of Anne Arundel County, Maryland (Family Line Publications, Rear 63 East Main Street, Westminister, Maryland 21157 – 1992), Philadelphia Genealogical Society Library, Page 101.

 

So, there is some validity to the Note about an ancestor being in the Revolutionary was, but also rules out the “father” piece of the statement used in the TV program.


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