1940 Census–Franklin Brinton Strode

April 23, 2012

311 South Walnut Street was listed with this family in 1920, 1935, and 1940. It’s also on the same street that will appear as other family members over time

1940_311SWalnut

Franklin was a 1st Cousin, 2 times removed on my mother’s side of the family.

House_WC_311SouthWalnut-1

The house is across the street and less then half a block from where my mother’s parents lived, when I knew them. I may have actually been inside of this house.


1940 Census – Ellwood Palmer Strode

April 22, 2012

This is the first in a series of blog posts of Photos relating to the 1940 Census.

Here is the 1940 Census for this household:

1940CensusEPS

There is a couple of issues here: The wife’s name is not Louise. Louise was not 45 at the time. I will find the wife, my mother, elsewhere in the 1940 census.

Two people are missing, my grandmother and my aunt, as can be seen in the 1930 Census.

1930Census-EPS

Mary L Million was a maid in 1930 and was confirmed to be by my mother before she passed away.

I confirmed with my aunt, that she was still at the above address in 1940, as she was in high school and living at home.

Here is a photo taken in 2012 of that house as recorded in the 1940 Census. Will have to work to get a better one.

House_EB_145Lenape

However, here is a picture of the same house in 1929, which would be just before the 1930 Census as reported above.

House_Strode_House-1929

Next to the house is a barn and this was taken in 1938, just before the 1940 Census.

House_Strode_Barn-1938

In 1999, the barn looked like this.

House_Strode_Barn-1999a


Successful 1940 Census House Picture trip

April 21, 2012

Having spent a lot of time doing manual scanning of the 1940 Census, recording the data found, and noting street addresses when provided, We took a  “day trip” to West Chester, Pennsylvania.

I had a spreadsheet of 28 houses with street addresses from the 1940 Census. With my assistant, note taker, we roamed the streets taking pictures of the houses.

Of the 28 Addresses, 4 of them, we didn’t have time to get to, due to the distance, and it was a day trip. BUT, I also already have pictures of them. 4 of the 28 we could not locate. It may be that the house numbers changed between 1940 and 2012. We came home with 20 of the 28. Not bad.

But, we picked up 3 other houses, that I wanted to capture/

Stopped at two Cemeteries, but that’s another story, and the Church where I attended as a kid, but that will also be another story and blog post here.

Over the next couple of days, I will post this photo’s, along with the Census information and some information about the families who lived in these houses.

More to follow:


Tech Tuesday – Pennsylvania Death Index – Follow Up

February 14, 2012

Yesterday I posted a new, to me, resource:

Pennsylvania Death Index

I thought that I would update how to use the website. As mentioned, they use a Russell Soundex for finding people. The fine print on the Russell Soundex Method of Indexing for this website is for Death Record Years: 1920 through 1924 and 1830 through 1951.

I created a Custom Report to help me with that, and here is a sample of that report:

PA-DoH-RussellSoundex

The three records in the red box, WILL use the Russell Soundex. The listing before and after will NOT. Sorting the report by Date was very helpful with finding the Records, as they are grouped by year in the Pennsylvania Death Index.

Finding the records in the PDF file is relatively easy. For example, I was looking for Florence Hoopes Hart. She died in West Chester, Pennsylvania on 19 Nov 1959. So, I selected 1959. This s NOT a Russell Soundex year, so I didn’t have to worry about that.

Once in 1959, I selected H-I-J, as her married name was Hart, an used the down arrow to page 45, which was page 905 of the document.

PA-DoH-1959-Death-HartFlorenceHoopes

What was important, for me, about this record is that a cousin, Florence’s daughter, has been looking for birth information about Florence. I am hoping that this record will help my cousin obtain more information about her mother.

Lesson Learned: Don’t be afraid of looking at new record groups and take a few minutes to read and understand how to use them.

A special thanks for the state of Pennsylvania in allowing us access to these records. I have found 14 of 15 people so far and about 20 to go.


Pennsylvania Death Index

February 13, 2012

After reading Claudia Genealogy Blog, I thought that I would give it a try, because I have a number of people in my files from Pennsylvania. So, I went to:

PENNSYLVANIA DEATH INDEX

to see what I could find. After trying to search the PDF files and just doing some scrolling, I figured that there had to be a better way. In the instructions, it says:

Several years of indices (1920-1924 deaths and 1930-1951 deaths) are listed according to the Russell Soundex method of indexing.

That’s a new one on me. So I read those instructions. I was looking for Wilmer Cheyney. I didn’t know his exact death year, but I had “About 1937” in my file. To convert Cheyney to the Russell Soundex, I determined that he should be listed a C 500. Loading the right PDF file and going to the right page, there is was.

PA-DoH-1937Death-CheyneyWilmer

Next, to create a list from my genealogy database for everyone who died in Pennsylvania between 1906 and 1961, translate to eh Russell Soundex and do some searching. I will then determine which, if any, I send away for. This will be one of them.

Thank you Claudia for the Blog Post.


Grandfather’s Place of work in 1916

November 9, 2011

I attend many Genealogy Webinars, online, hosted by Legacy Family Tree. http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/Webinars.asp. I have learned much from attending these Webinar’s and want to thank Geoff Rasmussen for making these available.

Today, Thomas MacEntee, of http://hidefgen.com/ did a webinar today called: It Is Well With My Soul: Finding Ancestors Amid the Rubble of Disaster and Misfortune.

He was going through a list of resources for “other” places to look if the normal resources don’t provide the information that you want. One very common website to visit in Cyndis List. A Great Website. But today he was very specific for Medical Disasters. I went to that website, http://www.cyndislist.com/medical/hospitals/ and found the Sanatorium where my grandfather Worthington managed the farm for Dr. Miller.

I have been looking for the Name of it, as I knew the name Dr. Miller.

NEWBURGH:  Newburgh Tuberculosis Sanatorium. Est'd 1910.  
Capacity.35.Private. Med. Staff. Supt. R.A.Miller, M.D.
MVC-028S

The above picture is all that was left of this Sanatorium in September 2003 when I took my parents to where my Dad was taken when he was 1 week old.

My grandfather moved there after he was married on 17 June 1915. So the Sanatorium had been around for 5 years. My grandparents, and my Dad returned to West Chester on Armistice Day.

MVC-030S

I have a letter written by my Great  Aunt Anna (my grandmother’s sister) who helped my grandmother take my Dad, by train, from Philadelphia to Brewster, NY and this farm.

Don’t know much about this place, but at least I now have the Name of Dr. Millers Sanatorium.


Time with a Cousin

November 6, 2011

Over the last couple of years, I have run into a “new” cousin. It started when I had time to listen to Genealogy PodCasts. A PodCast is like a radio show, but on an iPod. I would listen to these PodCasts going to and from work on the train. One of those PodCasts was Dear MYRTLE.

I had met her a couple of times over the past couple of years. She talked about Second Life (2nd Life), so I tried it out a couple of times, but then finally learned a little more and found the “virtual” meetings were very interesting, so I became a little more active. Later she and I did a joint meeting where we shared our genealogy screens. We soon realized that we might be related.

Dear MRYTLE was to give the talk at Lunch for the Family History Day this past weekend, so my wife, Patti and I left on Thursday to meet up with Dear MYRTLE and Mr. Myrt. We had a great time.

IMG_7122IMG_7124

One of the things we wanted to do was to see the house where my grandparents lived and the house that my Dad built. We did that.

Mr Myrt and I mentioned that Valley Forge was not that far away, so se took a run over there. Clearly the Visitors Center had changed since the last time we have been there, so we went in to “look around”. Mr Myrt had an ancestor who was at Valley Forge so we wanted to check that out. Then Dear MYRTLE mentioned a name from her ancestry who was there as well. That was the same family name that she and I shared in a presentation, so then I remembered that I had two ancestors that were in Valley Forge that winter.

IMG_7094

Dear MYRTLE’s ancestor and one of mine (same family) were from Maryland, so we looked him up and where the Monument was, and Mr Myrt mentioned his, and he was from Maine, which is where my other ancestor was from.

IMG_7101

What a beautiful day to spend time with “family” looked and finding Monuments for our ancestors.

IMG_7104

We wanted to visit the Chapel at Valley Forge, so we did.

IMG_7121

When we pulled in the driveway to park, the bells were ringing. Not a normal thing to happen on a Friday afternoon. Here a couple were celebrating their 60th wedding anniversary at the chapel, with the kids and grandchildren all there.

That family were able to “relive” the wedding day of that couple, 60 years later, but will be able to tell the story of last Friday, as a new chapter for them, but another chapter for the happy couple with their family.

Valley forge was just out side of the door and all of the history that took place there, but they will remember the story of the 60th Wedding Anniversary of the lovely couple.


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