Fearless Females Blog Post: March 8 – Favorite Female Ancestor – Prompts for Women’s History Month

March 8, 2010

I want to point out a series of daily blogging prompts entitled Fearless Females created by Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog in honor of Women’s History Month which starts today, 1 March 2010.

* March 8 — Did one of your female ancestors leave a diary, journal, or collection of letters? Share an entry or excerpt.

Actually I have two.

Ann C. Whitall, the Heroine of Read Bank, the Battle of Gloucester

and

From Tennessee to California in 1849. Letters of the Reeve Family of Medford, New Jersey.

In light of the most recent “Who Do You Think You Are” episode, with Sarah Jessica Parker, and her Gold Rush Story, I’ll put a short quote from one of these letters.

Sacrament City, California
December 30th 1849

(Letter written by Rebecca Reeve and addressed to her cousin, Mary W. Ely, Medford Burlington County, New Jersey.

<snip>

Dear Cousin

With what feeling of happiness could I adress a letter to thee now, my first from this pleasant City, this City grown up as if by magic, this the end of our long and tedious journey. This our resting place and I expect future home, . If we could number three, but Ah my Cousin, brother R and myself only lived to reach the end of our journey. I have to nerve myself to look back and relate to thee the horrible death of our dear brother Clayton. I wish the task were not mine. I seem to almost feel the terrible arrows of the savage Indians pierceing me as they pierced our deat brother. He was indeed killed by them, killed by some of the most fierce and Savage tribe in North America. The Clamath Indians, of Clamath lake, Oregon. over at their hunting and fishing grounds upon Pit river, upper Californina, where the emigration passed.

<end snip>

These letters were published in The Journal of the Rutgers University Library, Volune XI, Number 2, June 1948.


Fearless Females Blog Post: Prompts for Women’s History Month – Day 3

March 3, 2010

This is part of  a series of daily blogging prompts entitled Fearless Females created by Lisa Alzo of  The Accidental Genealogist blog in honor of Women’s History Month which starts today, 1 March 2010.

Here are the prompts – consider honoring your female ancestors by posting at your genealogy or family history blog!

* March 3

Do you share a first name with one of your female ancestors?

Perhaps you were named for your great-grandmother, or your name follows a particular naming pattern. If not, then list the most unique or unusual female first name you’ve come across in your family tree.

We pause for the discussion on Rear Admiral Grace Hopper, to be able to answer the question of the day. However, it does “honor’ a female ancestor. This time, my Great-Grandmother

As with many Quaker families, naming patterns exist down through the generations. I am one of them.

For those that know me, may know that I go by my middle name, not my first name. AND I have “III” or 3rd at the end of my name. Because my family lived on the same property as my paternal grandparents, I guess, I was to be called by my middle name, like my grandfather. My dad, was called by his first name.

Looking back, my Grandfather’s Grandfather was named Henry Wilson Worthington. So, we know where my grandfather, my father, and I got our first name from. BUT, where did our middle name come from? Oh, this will take a minute, but will get at the question of the day.

My grandfather’s parents died in Kansas in the 1890′s and he, and his next younger brother and sister were put on a train from Kansas to Philadelphia, where they were met (but there is a long story here) and were taken to New Jersey, to live with their Grandmother, Elizabeth Willits Worthington.

In doing some research in the 1900 Census, I knew where I should have found my Grandfather. I knew that he graduated from the Moorestown Friends School in 1907. So, he should have been in NJ 1900 Census. Didn’t find him. (At the time I did the search, not all names were indexed).

A little frustrated in not being able to find him nor his grandmother, I checked my notes on her to find that she had been married a second time. Searching for Elizabeth with a different surname, I found her.

Elizabeth Willits was married to Henry Wilson Worthington. They had Samuel, Sarah, Jeremiah Willits, Henry Wilson, Jr., Elizabeth Farnum, and Nathan B. Leads as children. Still no hint about where Russell fit in. The other names or parts of names can be explained looking at the family structure.

Looking at these families, Grandfather Samuel’s second sister married a Henry C. Russell, whose father was Henry Russell, of Ireland.

Most of the Russell’s are buried in the Friends South-Western Burial Ground in Philadelphia.

So, to answer the question, my name was handed down from the marriage of Elizabeth Farnum Worthington.

So, the mystery of how we (three) got our names was answered in a family letter, not in my possession, after a “dear friend”.


Worthington Descendants – Vol 1, No 2, Page 6 – Worthington, George F.

July 21, 2009

SKETCH OF GEORGE F. WORTHINGTON: 25 March 1877 at Readingville, Pa. mar. Nettie Thomas of Newark, N.J. on 19 Nov, 1900. He died in 1943 at Minneapolis, Minnesota. Issue: George, Jr.; Ruth Marjorie


Worthington Descendants – Vol 1, No 2, Page 6 – Worthington, Oril

July 20, 2009

SKETCH OF ORIL WORTHINGTON: 1871-1945 at Lafayette, Indiana mar. 1899 Frederick Hagney, M.D. of Newark, N.J. Issue: Pauline and Frederick, Jr. She is buried Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, N.J.


Worthington Descendants – Vol 1, No 2, Page 5 – Worthington, Ephraim

July 11, 2009

SKETCH OF EPHRAIM WORTHINGTON: 1697-1727 born West Heath, Ireland died at Piles Grove, Salem Co., N.J. mar. 1722 Elizabeth D/O John and Hannah (Davis) Brick. Issue: Esther; Rachel; Elizabeth


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