Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Why Read Wills

September 28, 2011

Here is another example of Expanding your research. I have, sort-a, read Wills in the past. They were interesting, but don’t normally read and record what I find in them.

This project reminded me of why I should read wills.

Doing a generic Google search for Charles Ridgely, believed to be a brother of David Ridgely OR the father of another Ridgely, I came across a link to the Maryland State Archives for “a” Charles Ridgely. The search results were “in the ball park” for what I was looking for. But, check the wording in the Will:

Quote:

Charles Ridgely of Hampton (1760-1829)
MSA SC 3520-1446

Governor of Maryland, 1816-1819 (Federalist)

December 6, 1760 in Baltimore as Charles Ridgely Carnan.  His uncle, Captain Charles Ridgely, willed his estate to him on the condition that he assume the name Charles Ridgely; he did so legally in 1790.  He was also known as Charles Ridgely of Hampton.

End Quote:

[ This information resource of the Maryland State Archives is presented here for fair use in the public domain. When this material is used, in whole or in part, proper citation and credit must be attributed to the Maryland State Archives. PLEASE NOTE: Rights assessment for associated source material is the responsibility of the user. ]

© Copyright March 31, 2011Maryland State Archives

It turned out that Carnan surname shows up in this line, so now I know “where that name came from”.

Learning: Read Wills


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–A New Resource

September 26, 2011

It has been apparent that there were Two Howard families in Baltimore. Better stated, I thought there were two, but hadn’t found anything to prove or disprove this. Some might call this Conflict Resolution. There may be a third, but I am not ready to go there yet.

I heard Thomas Jay Kemp say in a Webinar, “Don’t forget the Newspapers”. Oh yeah, I have said that here as well, but after listing to what GenealogyBank.com can provide us. Besides, I needed to look at some new records.

I was reminded that one of the Howards was in the Garrison Forrest section of Baltimore County, when I found a newspaper article about General John Eager Howard. He is one of the Revolutionary War people that I have found using the Revolutionary War records.

I have visited St. Thomas Episcopal Church Garrison Forrest a couple of years ago while doing some Worthington research. Later I have a talk for the Maryland Historical Society about a house “just down the road” in Worthington Valley. I have also Blogged about that house here, Montmorenci.

When I visited St. Thomas, I picked up the history of that Church, and low and behold  General Howard was listed in that book, as was the Worthington’s I had been researching.

The “conflict” was this Howard family from England in the mid to late 1600’s, being Anglican, or the Quaker Howards that came to the colonies much earlier.

From the information that I have on hand, and the information I have from this History book, I can but This Howard line aside for a while, because if may not be the same Howard Line that David Ridgely Howard is in.

Many of the names that I added to my database today are also mentioned in this book from St. Thomas Garrison Forrest. But that’s another story (for now)

If only I could find David R. Howard’s grandparents.

Maybe I need to look at some of my other Maryland books that are on my bookshelf.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–We’re Getting Close

September 25, 2011

Not connected all of the dot’s, but we are getting close. Remembering the David Ridgely Howard has two of my family surnames, Ridgely and Howard. Working my way back to the Revolutionary War ancestor of “Ridgely” I found the connection between the Howards and the Ridgely with a Ridgely, Col Henry Ridgely, Jr (1635 – 1710) buried in the same burial ground of my ancestor, Capt John Worthington (1607 – 1701). It is in the Saint Anne’s Burial Ground in Annapolis, Maryland.

I am not looking into my own family file, yet, but I think I am going to find at least one connection between David Ridgely Howard and Sarah Howard, Capt John’s wife.

But, I think there are other connections, as there are several other Surnames that I have found, along the way, that also link into my family file.


The continued search for the Stair Case

September 16, 2011

In this Blog post: http://worthy2be.wordpress.com/2011/02/03/in-search-of-montmorenci/ I continue my search for these two staircases. Earlier, I mentioned that the 2nd staircase was located at the Winterthur Museum in Delaware. I joined there, with my daughter, so we could visit this wonderful museum and learn more about it and the staircase Its a wonderful place to visit.

Recently, they started a blog:

http://museumblog.winterthur.org/

So, I posted this question:

To the Staff:

Wonderful new Blog. Thank you.

I hope it’s OK to ask here.

In the museum, you have the Montmorenci Staircase. That staircase, as I understand it, came from South Carolina from a house called Montmorenci. I have seen photos of that house and have seen a couple of brief stories.

However, not an hour south of Winterthur is another Montmorenci which also has a Montmorenci Stair case.

So, my question is, how come there are Two Montmorenci’s and both of those houses have similar staircases.

My guess is, that the answer lies within architectural information about one or both of the houses. Did the architect or Mr duPont know of the Maryland Montmorenci.

I have posted some information on the Maryland Montmorenci here:

http://worthy2be.wordpress.com/tag/montmorenci/

Thank you for your time an consideration and I look forward to your new Blog posts. With any luck, I’ll get back down to Winterthur this fall.

Thank you,

Russ

I did get an answer. Perhaps not the answer I wanted, but here it is.

Russ, I checked with our estate historian, and here’s what she says: The answer has to do with a coincidence of name. A French aristocrat named Montmorency commanded troops under Rochambeau in the American Revolution and became an American hero. There are many towns and houses named after him. The staircase in Maryland is curved like the one from the house named Montmorenci, which was located near Shocco Springs, North Carolina, but is not free-standing. The free-standing curve is what interested du Pont. Hope this helps!

So, for now, I will put my research aside for a while, as there may not have been a connection in the first place. The time for the naming of the property may be the connection, but what about the stairs. I need to make another visit to Maryland to get a better look at the staircase and to see if I can find “the rest of that story”.

So, for now, back to my Civil War Hero.


Blog Query: Worthington–Maryland to North Carolina

September 12, 2011

Claude Worthington III says:

June 15, 2009 at 8:36 pm (Edit)

After all these years… there is a website for the Worthington Descendants??? I am very excited to be here!

I used to write to, I believe, her name was Francis Brengle… she was so helpful and patient when I first started in 1986.

I am still researching my Worthington line in hopes to be connected to Maryland from North Carolina. Each year, I get closer…

I just can’t believe this website!

Thank you so much for doing this!

Sincerely,

Mr. Claude E. Worthington III
Daleville, VA

Reply


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