Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–A New Resource

September 26, 2011

It has been apparent that there were Two Howard families in Baltimore. Better stated, I thought there were two, but hadn’t found anything to prove or disprove this. Some might call this Conflict Resolution. There may be a third, but I am not ready to go there yet.

I heard Thomas Jay Kemp say in a Webinar, “Don’t forget the Newspapers”. Oh yeah, I have said that here as well, but after listing to what GenealogyBank.com can provide us. Besides, I needed to look at some new records.

I was reminded that one of the Howards was in the Garrison Forrest section of Baltimore County, when I found a newspaper article about General John Eager Howard. He is one of the Revolutionary War people that I have found using the Revolutionary War records.

I have visited St. Thomas Episcopal Church Garrison Forrest a couple of years ago while doing some Worthington research. Later I have a talk for the Maryland Historical Society about a house “just down the road” in Worthington Valley. I have also Blogged about that house here, Montmorenci.

When I visited St. Thomas, I picked up the history of that Church, and low and behold  General Howard was listed in that book, as was the Worthington’s I had been researching.

The “conflict” was this Howard family from England in the mid to late 1600’s, being Anglican, or the Quaker Howards that came to the colonies much earlier.

From the information that I have on hand, and the information I have from this History book, I can but This Howard line aside for a while, because if may not be the same Howard Line that David Ridgely Howard is in.

Many of the names that I added to my database today are also mentioned in this book from St. Thomas Garrison Forrest. But that’s another story (for now)

If only I could find David R. Howard’s grandparents.

Maybe I need to look at some of my other Maryland books that are on my bookshelf.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–We’re Getting Close

September 25, 2011

Not connected all of the dot’s, but we are getting close. Remembering the David Ridgely Howard has two of my family surnames, Ridgely and Howard. Working my way back to the Revolutionary War ancestor of “Ridgely” I found the connection between the Howards and the Ridgely with a Ridgely, Col Henry Ridgely, Jr (1635 – 1710) buried in the same burial ground of my ancestor, Capt John Worthington (1607 – 1701). It is in the Saint Anne’s Burial Ground in Annapolis, Maryland.

I am not looking into my own family file, yet, but I think I am going to find at least one connection between David Ridgely Howard and Sarah Howard, Capt John’s wife.

But, I think there are other connections, as there are several other Surnames that I have found, along the way, that also link into my family file.


The continued search for the Stair Case

September 16, 2011

In this Blog post: http://worthy2be.wordpress.com/2011/02/03/in-search-of-montmorenci/ I continue my search for these two staircases. Earlier, I mentioned that the 2nd staircase was located at the Winterthur Museum in Delaware. I joined there, with my daughter, so we could visit this wonderful museum and learn more about it and the staircase Its a wonderful place to visit.

Recently, they started a blog:

http://museumblog.winterthur.org/

So, I posted this question:

To the Staff:

Wonderful new Blog. Thank you.

I hope it’s OK to ask here.

In the museum, you have the Montmorenci Staircase. That staircase, as I understand it, came from South Carolina from a house called Montmorenci. I have seen photos of that house and have seen a couple of brief stories.

However, not an hour south of Winterthur is another Montmorenci which also has a Montmorenci Stair case.

So, my question is, how come there are Two Montmorenci’s and both of those houses have similar staircases.

My guess is, that the answer lies within architectural information about one or both of the houses. Did the architect or Mr duPont know of the Maryland Montmorenci.

I have posted some information on the Maryland Montmorenci here:

http://worthy2be.wordpress.com/tag/montmorenci/

Thank you for your time an consideration and I look forward to your new Blog posts. With any luck, I’ll get back down to Winterthur this fall.

Thank you,

Russ

I did get an answer. Perhaps not the answer I wanted, but here it is.

Russ, I checked with our estate historian, and here’s what she says: The answer has to do with a coincidence of name. A French aristocrat named Montmorency commanded troops under Rochambeau in the American Revolution and became an American hero. There are many towns and houses named after him. The staircase in Maryland is curved like the one from the house named Montmorenci, which was located near Shocco Springs, North Carolina, but is not free-standing. The free-standing curve is what interested du Pont. Hope this helps!

So, for now, I will put my research aside for a while, as there may not have been a connection in the first place. The time for the naming of the property may be the connection, but what about the stairs. I need to make another visit to Maryland to get a better look at the staircase and to see if I can find “the rest of that story”.

So, for now, back to my Civil War Hero.


Blog Query: Worthington–Maryland to North Carolina

September 12, 2011

Claude Worthington III says:

June 15, 2009 at 8:36 pm (Edit)

After all these years… there is a website for the Worthington Descendants??? I am very excited to be here!

I used to write to, I believe, her name was Francis Brengle… she was so helpful and patient when I first started in 1986.

I am still researching my Worthington line in hopes to be connected to Maryland from North Carolina. Each year, I get closer…

I just can’t believe this website!

Thank you so much for doing this!

Sincerely,

Mr. Claude E. Worthington III
Daleville, VA

Reply


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – 1890 Census Substitute

August 9, 2011

As I reviewed the Census for the various years, learning what information is added as each version of the Census progresses. Then running into 1890. What do you do to see where the family was in 1890. The households changed over time, where were they in 1890.

The first place, in a broader search, I remembered City Directories. Looking in the Baltimore City Directory, there is David R. Howard.

HowardDavidRiddgely-1890BaltimoreCityDirectory

The address, 939 St Paul, is consistent the previous and following Census Record.

Will then look for the other family members in the same City Directory. This will also help see household members who were in the 1880 Census, but not in the 1900 Census.

This is a reminder to Search Broadly.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Muster Rolls #2

July 18, 2011

As a follow up to

Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Muster Rolls

That post was about David Ridgely Howard, but it referred to a brother. Here is that information.

First and Second Maryland Infantry
Muster Rolls

Page 445

HOWARD, JAMES MC HENRY

Pvt., Co. C(2nd), 1st Md. Inf. b. Baltimore 3/26/39. Att. St. James College & U of Va. Res. of Baltimore. Enl. Richmond 5/17/61. Ab. sick Strasburg 6/25-31/61. Ab. sick in camp near Centreville 10/29-31/61. Ab. on detached service at Haymarket 11-12/61. Discharged 6/23/52. Promoted Lt. Of Art. 6/24/62. Assigned as Acting Asst. Adjt General on staff of Col. T.S. Rhett, commanding the artillery defenses of Richmond 1862-63. Ord. Officer on Gen. Elzey’s staff, 5-7/64. Asst. Adjutant General on Gen. Stevens staff 8/64. May have served on the staffs of Gen.’s Nicholls, Hays and B.T. Johnson 1864. NFR. Emigrated to Canada 1865. M.D., Baltimore. Served in Engineer Corps, Baltimore, postwar. Lawyer. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association. d. Oakland, Md. 1/31/16. Believed bur. in the Old St. Paul’s Cem., Baltimore.

NFR: No further record

As with his brother, I have his Civil War records.

His venture to Canada wasn’t very long, as he is in the 1870 Census with David.

No further along to the Parents, but the Family is taking shape.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Muster Rolls

July 17, 2011

First and Second Maryland Infantry by Robert J. Driver Jr.
Muster Rolls
Page 444

HOWARD, DAVID RIDGELY.

Pvt. Co. A, 2nd Md. Inf. b. 1844. Res. of Baltimore. Enl. Richmond 8/21/62 age 18. WIA (flesh wound to thigh) Gettysburg 7/3/63. Paid 7/17/63. Ab. wounded in Charlottesville hospital 8/14-17/63. Transf. Richmond hospital. Returned to duty 9/63. Paid 1/11/64. Present 3/31/64. WIA (upper portion of right thigh amputated) Weldon R.T. 8/19/65. Ab. wounded in Richmond hospital 8/21/64. Retired to Invalid Corps 12/24/64. Paroled Charlottesville 5/1/65. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association 1910, res of Baltimore. d. 12/23/27. Bur. Green Mount Cem. Brother of James McHenry Howard, 1st Md. Inf.

I have seen this same information in his Civil War files. (still working on them). Going through this book is quite interesting. Will probably blog about the book later.

Wounded twice but still lived to be 83.

The James McHenry Howard is not the only brother who served in the First and Second Maryland Infantry. There are a couple of other names in this book that “are family”.


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