Initial Summary of David Ridgely Howard

October 14, 2011

In the mail today, I received a book “Marylanders in the Confederacy” by Daniel D. Hartzler, Willow Bend Books, Westminster, Maryland, 2001. In it, in one sentence confirmed by findings on Page 3.

“The 1st Marland under Kenley was the only Maryland regiment on the Union side. The Confederate Marylanders on the other hand, embodied faith and pride of the state. Not a historic family of Maryland was not represented in the Maryland Line. Five grandsons of John Eager Howard, of Cowpens carried sword or muskets in the 1st Maryland Regiment.”

Cowpens was a battle in the Revolutionary War with General George Washington. So, John Eager Howard is the “grandfather” that was talked about in the PBS series Gettysburg.

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John Eager Howard (1752 – 1827) and his wife Margaret Oswald Chew (1760 – 1827) had 10 children. Two of their sons were James Howard (1797 – 1732) and Charles Howard (1802 – 1869) had the “5 grandsons”

Charles Howard and son Francis (Frank) Key Howard (Key from Francis Scott Key) were captured in Baltimore by the Union Army.

Sons Edward Lloyd Howard and McHenry Howard served in the 1st Maryland.

James Howard had three sons that served, John Eager Howard (1797 – 1870), James McHenry Howard (1839 – 1916), and David Ridgely Howard (1844 – 1927).

The best that I can tell, at this point, is the all 5 of John Eager Howards grandsons were at Gettysburg in 1863.

My calculations would make David Ridgely Howard my 5th Cousin, 4 times removed. I now have a Confederate Civil War Hero. Not to mention that my Great-Grandfather, Samuel Worthington, was a Union Civil War Hero.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Map Follow up

October 10, 2011

In an earlier post on the use of a Map.

Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Map

I showed the relationship of where folks lived. I ran into another problem where the Street Name was not clear. I knew the house number, had seen it before in an earlier census record. In looking at the previous record, I really could read it either. It looked like East 26th Street.

One think that I have learned, is to look at the neighbors. In this case, that wouldn’t really help, but the notion to go back to look at how the previous and next pages recorded the street names. I had North Calvert Street and Guilford Streets. The house numbering on Guilford Street were from 2532 – 2502 (Even Numbers), then to my street, which I thought was East 26th Street, 202 – 206, then Calvert Street, 2501 – 2503 etc. So, the Census taker started at what appeared to be the 27th Street end of Guilford Street, came toward 26th street, followed 26th street and headed back to 27th street on the odd side of the street. This was from the 1910 Census.

From the previous map and the fact I had been keeping track of House Numbers of Family Numbers and recording the Street Names (when available), it appeared that these street names hadn’t changed much over time.

So, I did a Google Search for 202 East 26th Street, Baltimore, Maryland. Not only did I see a Google Street View (current view), but the map, sure enough, confirmed the theory. So, I now know the street name that I couldn’t read on the Census Record.

1910_Fed_MD_Baltimore-HowardJMcHenry

Clearly this is current street information and I am sure the buildings are different, perhaps, but I was able to determine the street name by checking the Preceding and Following Census Pages and checking the house numbers.

The next time I go to Baltimore, I will take all of the street names and addresses with me and take some pictures of the houses. The quick drive through recently, showed me where the houses were, but only took one picture. Will have to add the pictures to my database.

Lesson Learned: Look at the neighbors and map


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Conflict Resolution

October 9, 2011

One of the steps in this process is dealing with Conflicts within your genealogy database.

Today was one of those days to deal with a couple of conflicts. The first was to review and adjust information on two people. James McHenry Howard and McHenry Howard. Both lived in close proximity to the other but there were two separate households. The good news is that the households stayed together, if they moved at all. Both were born about 1838 or 1839, but that might have been a census record issue.

The key difference was McHenry Howard occupation was a Lawyer while James McHenry Howard was a physician. Their fathers were of similar ages, and I could connect McHenry’s father back to a long Howard Line. Couldn’t connect James McHenry Howards father back nor could I connect him to McHenry’s father.

Another “conflict” was a brother of McHenry Howard’s father Charles. It has been listed as James. James was also James McHenry Howard’s father.

It was not clear that these two James were the same person, but could not make any connection.

I took a side step a minute to see what I may have missed. Certainly a City Directory would have shown the Doctor and the Lawyer somewhere. However, I didn’t find a good directory for the timeframe. I happened to do that search on Genealogy Bank. That’s when I found an obituary. The Obituary was for a Elizabeth Phoebe Key Howard. Key, as in Francis Scott Key. Elizabeth Phoebe Key Howard was the oldest daughter of Frances Scott Key. It listed the pallbearers, which included Messers, William R. Howard, Dr. James McHenry Howard, Edward Lloyd Key, Dr. Henry J Key, W. George Weld, Wilson Cary McHenry, Richard H. Pose, and G.T. Beaureguard Howard, all of whom are family connections of Mrs. Howard.

Dr. James McHenry was not a son of Mrs. Howard, William R. Howard WAS a brother of McHenry Howard.

Reviewing the Census Records and how I had recorded the relationships I had found, I resolved the two James Howards, as the same person, making James McHenry Howard’s Father, the Brother of McHenry Howard’s Father.

Lesson Learned: The Obituary pointed the way “all whom are family connections of Mrs. Howard to a review of the relationships established in the Census Records. The two families were buried in separate cemeteries but they lived in the same neighborhood. The headstones firmed but the relationships.

A bonus: This puts David Ridgely Howard into my Family Tree.


Blog Query: Sarah R. Howard

October 3, 2011

Below was in a comment on a blog post here and am hoping some of the readers may be able to help Sharon out.

From: Sharon Ellis sharonellis@yahoo.com

Russ,

My Sarah R. Howard was born around 1794 in Scott County, Kentucky, which is where Georgetown, Ky is located, outside of Lexington. She married Lyman Merriman and moved with him to central Illinois, where they are buried.

Because the Scott Co. courthouse burned twice in the 1800s, there are not many records. When I’ve googled “Howard” + Scott County KY”, the only Howard I’ve found is John Howard, John B. Howard, and John Bazel Howard.

John was listed as John B. Howard and John Bazel Howard on two early Scott Co Ky censuses. I think it was 1800 and 1820. He witnessed a will of a MD native (who was part of the Catholic immigration into that part of Ky) around 1808 or 1810 as “John Howard”, if I remember correctly.

I didn’t know if “Bazel” was a misspelling of Basil, or if it was a family name associated with the Howard family that was given to him as his middle name. Are you familiar with any Bazel family members who may have married into either the MD or VA Howard families? I’ve found people in MD with the Bazel surname and probably need to research the Bazel family to see if I find any intermarriage with the Howards.

My assumptions, which could be wrong, are that John Bazel Howard immigrated to Ky with part of the 65 or so Catholic families from MD who agreed to settle in Kentucky. Part settled in Nelson Co Ky below Louisville, and part of the group who didn’t like Nelson Co settled instead in Scott Co, outside of Lexington.

I assume that Sarah R Howard was John Bazel Howard’s daughter. I have no record of him moving to central Illinois, when Sarah “Sally” left Scott Co. with her husband and his family. in the early 1830s. I did once find a John B. Howard in Butler Co., Ky, (I think around 1840 or so). Butler Co is 150 mi. southwest of Scott Co. I didn’t see an age for that John B Howard.

I’m hoping this will ring a bell, or that you will eventually stumble across something in all your Howard research that might provide a clue or two. Would love to see your Howard ancestors and their dates/locations listed, sometime.

Thanks,
Sharon Ellis


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Connections

October 2, 2011

I must say, that I haven’t posted all of my findings on this project. I am really trying to stay focused on the Methodology that Dr. Jones has presented. Going through all of the pictures from yesterday, I thought that I would show one of my findings.

Driving around Baltimore, “in search of …. “ the Howards, I saw a new monument about a block from one of the houses that I found.

This house is 901 St Paul Street. McHenry Howard and household in the 1920 Census. Up the street, within the block was another residence of this household in previous census records. There is a historical marker, which I couldn’t get close enough to, said that this was the home of Samuel Shoemaker (another mystery). But, there it is. St. Paul Street carries the name of an Episcopal Church not to far away.

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Behind me, as I took this picture a block or two was a statue of John Eager Howard (1752-1827). Within a block or two was Eager Street.  Like many folks I have run across in this project, he has a story.

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Here is a picture of the Statue.

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Speaking of Episcopal Churches:

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I could not get a good enough position to take a picture of the church itself, but I will visit one day when I can get it. Mentioned in a previous Blog post, Worthington’s were at this church, moved out to St. Thomas Garrison Forrest, then to Worthington Valley. But, I digress.

Back to John Eager Howard.

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If you read this sign: this lot was proved by Col. John Eager Howard.

Why all of the interest in this little side trip, away from David Ridgely Howard? I peeked at my own database and guess who I found. John Eager Howard. His wife is my 3rd Cousin, 6 times removed. That linkage, may hold the clue to David Ridgely Howard.

I have often heard, “look sideways”. This to me is one of those glances sideways. I have David Ridgeley Howards’ names, but can’t get the previous generation.

It is obvious to me, that the folks that I have found, for this project, were known and had an impact on Baltimore. Many of the surnames I have mentioned thus far are street names within blocks of where these pictures were taken.

Lesson Learned: Had I only known what I would be doing when I retired, I would have “walked the streets” when I worked in Baltimore. These places are all within walking distance of my job.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Cemetery Visit

October 2, 2011

Some of you may know that I contribute to and use the Find-A-Grave website for useful information. I have contributed several hundred pictures, have given a number of talks on the subject. Oh, and I use it for research. Some times you can get relationships in some of the information associated with a memorial. I have been doing that for this project.

However, I have not been able to find David Ridgely Howard, a Civil War Veteran on Find-A-Grave. I found that quite interesting, considering all of the Civil War headstone pictures I have taken, especially around Memorial Day and Veterans Day. He just wasn’t there.

I decided I needed to take a short, day trip to Baltimore. The purpose of the trip was to actually see some of the places that the Census Records had shown me, and to visit one cemetery.

Now, I worked in Baltimore for 2 years, so I had some idea where some of these places were (are). They were only blocks from where I worked. How difficult can this trip be.

So I made the trip, spent an hour or so on the USCGC Eagle, (USCG Barque Eagle, America’s Tall Ship), then found a couple of the addresses that were in the Census Records. The relationships between the addresses, Church, and Cemetery all made sense to me. Street Names, a Monument were all in line with what I had mapped out in my mind. Thanks to GPS, (more of the time) the trip was easy.

The first cemetery was chained and locked, with no parking in the area to stop more then a minute to take a picture of the lock and chain. Went by the Church that was associated with the Cemetery and then a light bulb went off. I have been to this church before. A line from Capt. John Worthington was a member at that church. A Duh moment.

Re-programmed “Betty Lou” to take me to Green Mount Cemetery, to see if I could find David Ridgely Howard there. His Civil War records said he was, but not listed on Find-A-Grave. I have paperwork to send for information, but since I was there, why not look around.

The Cemetery was not far away, 10 minutes or so, and the gate was half open, but a caretaker was there who let me in. 45 minutes until closing. Nice gentlemen, but he didn’t have access to any information. So, a ride around the cemetery to get a overview of who I might find there. There were a number of family Surnames that I know from the Baltimore / Annapolis area were resting there. Will have to review my pictures to see if any of them were in my files. But, where is Pvt. Howard.

The rain was starting, the time was running out, but there was one road I hadn’t tried. At the top of the hill was a large, flat HOWARD stone. The Howard I knew there was Benjamin Chew Howard. Of course my Droid Find-A-Grave AP helped, and since is was ‘famous’ in the area, certainly I could find him. But, again, Find-A-Grave didn’t have a picture, only a Memorial. Could this large, flat, stone hold the remains of this family? It might be the reason why the others aren’t listed on Find-A-Grave. I’ll be on the phone on Monday to see if this theory doesn’t pan out. I can then order more detailed information that they have on their website.

Not done for the day yet, Since I am now pretty sure that I was dealing with Two Families, and have a pretty good idea who belongs to whom, though sharing some comment names, I needed to go to a third cemetery.

DearMYRTLE and I have some common ancestors that the next cemetery. my wife and I have visited this church and cemetery before, but hadn’t made this Howard Connection here. I had only made a Worthington connection. It’s the same connection with the Church in Baltimore.

There, was a pretty good sized plot of the 2nd Howard family, are at least some of them.

Lots of pictures to review, post on Find-A-Grave and take the information from them an put them into my database.

Learning from this: Some times a physical visit to a place my help with new clues in resolving a brick wall. Do I have David Ridgely Howard’s grandparents yet? No! Am I still missing a puzzle piece? Yes! But, I DO know, my next steps.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Why Read Wills

September 28, 2011

Here is another example of Expanding your research. I have, sort-a, read Wills in the past. They were interesting, but don’t normally read and record what I find in them.

This project reminded me of why I should read wills.

Doing a generic Google search for Charles Ridgely, believed to be a brother of David Ridgely OR the father of another Ridgely, I came across a link to the Maryland State Archives for “a” Charles Ridgely. The search results were “in the ball park” for what I was looking for. But, check the wording in the Will:

Quote:

Charles Ridgely of Hampton (1760-1829)
MSA SC 3520-1446

Governor of Maryland, 1816-1819 (Federalist)

December 6, 1760 in Baltimore as Charles Ridgely Carnan.  His uncle, Captain Charles Ridgely, willed his estate to him on the condition that he assume the name Charles Ridgely; he did so legally in 1790.  He was also known as Charles Ridgely of Hampton.

End Quote:

[ This information resource of the Maryland State Archives is presented here for fair use in the public domain. When this material is used, in whole or in part, proper citation and credit must be attributed to the Maryland State Archives. PLEASE NOTE: Rights assessment for associated source material is the responsibility of the user. ]

© Copyright March 31, 2011Maryland State Archives

It turned out that Carnan surname shows up in this line, so now I know “where that name came from”.

Learning: Read Wills


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