Planned Weekend Trip – Day 1

August 1, 2012

There is a “family reunion” this weekend in Darlington, Maryland. I have not been to this reunion before and don’t know what to expect.

We had planned to go to the National Battlefield at Monocacy, Maryland to attend the “Return of Special Orders 191” presentation and new exhibit. Not sure what to expect there either, but Civil War, Monocacy, why not go find out.

When the reunion information came out in a Newsletter that I receive and knowing this area of Maryland, it has become a weekend trip. Unlike some of the day trips that I have made in the past. But this one will be a “three for…”.

Between Monocacy and Darlington is another Worthington family location in Worthington Valley. I’ll post more about that location later. But the plan is to go to Monocacy, stay over night, go to church at Saint John’s Episcopal Church (Western Run) in Glyndon, then head to Darlington.

I have posted a number of items on this blog about Monocacy.

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I blogged about this a couple of weeks ago.

The Battle of Monocacy–148 Year Ago

In this battle, some orders were issue by Confederate General Robert E. Lee, but they were lost, but later found by a Union soldier. The event on Saturday is a special event and exhibit at the Battlefield.

More information can be found here:

http://www.nps.gov/mono/parknews/return_so_191.htm

As mentioned before, part of this battle took place on the Worthington Farm.

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To help put this farm into my family tree, here is a descendant chart from my ancestor, Captain John Worthington (1650 – 1701) to the owners of the Worthington Farm.

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Because the chart may not be readable:

Descendants of Capt John and Sarah Howard Worthington
John Worthington, Jr 1689 – 1763
John Worthington III 1728 – 1790
James Worthington 1772 – 1854
John Henry H Worthington 1793 – 1858
John Thomas Worthington 1828 – 1905
Glenn Howard Worthington 1858 – 1934

The farm was owned by John Thomas Worthington. John Worthington, Jr, was the oldest son of Capt. John and Sarah.

Of note, if you have been following this blog, Howard shows up again, in the final entry above, Glenn Howard Worthington.

I had met the grandson of Glenn Howard Worthington a couple of times, include in 1999 when a hiking trail at the Worthington Farm was dedicated. He, David Reed, has since passed away.

Looking forward to this event and exhibit, and finding more about this important battle of the Civil War.


The Battle of Monocacy–148 Year Ago

July 8, 2012

It’s called the Battle that Saved Washington.

July 7, 2012, the National Park Service celebrated the Battle of Monocacy that took place on July 9, 1864. It was to have been a two day event, but the temperature was in the 90’s, so they backed it off to one day. Monocacy is a couple of miles south of Frederick, Maryland.

So what was it like in 1864? Don’t know, as I haven’t found any temperature readings for that date and place, but there was much to be learned about this battle.

There were three farms along the Monocacy River, where this battle took place. One on the North side of the river, the Best Farm, Two on the South, the Thomas and Worthington Farms.

The Best Farm:

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The Thomas Farm:

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And the Worthington Farm:

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The owner of this farm was John Thomas Worthington (1826-1905) who is my 4th Cousin, 3 Times Removed. His ancestor was the oldest son of Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701), while my ancestor was the youngest son of Capt. John.

Judge Glenn Howard Worthington (1858-1934) was the son of John Thomas Worthington who wrote the book “The Battle that Saved Washington”.  It should be noted, that Judge Worthington was involved in creating this National Battlefield before his death in 1934.

The re-enactor’s for the day, were “in uniform”, as they may have been 148 years ago, and had a number of demonstrations to give a hint as to what the battle might have looked like.

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The story teller, gave us a hint into the life of the Confederate Army at the time of this battle.

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The above photography was demonstrating a Skirmish Line, as an advanced party ahead of the Confederate Army that was behind them.

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The Union story teller, walked us through “by the 9 count”, and what that was so important.

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The Union Army was demonstrating “by the 9 count” way of firing. Oh, did you know that 4 teeth and 2 fingers were required to be in the Army? We learned why.

The National Park Service provided information about the importance of this battle. This was the only battle that the Confederate Army won on Union Soil?

The Confederate Army was going to take Washington, DC. The Union Army was “out of place”, and were trying to get re-enforcements back to DC to fortify the city.

The Union Army was able to slow down the Confederate Army for “a day”, allowing those re-enforcements to get back into place.

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The heat of the day, watching the demonstration, helped put this battle into perspective, from the stories of this battle, at this place, 148 years ago.


War of 1812 and Fold3.com Search Result

July 6, 2012

Last year, I posted this:

Initial Summary of David Ridgely Howard

and more recently

Another Link to the War of 1812

I was doing a little more research ON the War of 1812. For Military Records, my first stop is normally Fold3.com. What I found was link to War of 1812 Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Application Files.

What did that record have to do with me. There wasn’t too much of interest to me, BUT the name on the Letter Head.

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John Eager Howard Chapter. Chapter of What?

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the D.A.R., in Baltimore, Maryland. So, in searching the War of 1812, I found, or found again, an Ancestor, John Eager Howard, 3rd cousin, 6x removed. Why wouldn’t there be a DAR Chapter named after him. He did fight in the Revolutionary War. Must have been a real hero.


Another Link to the War of 1812

July 3, 2012

While aboard the Pride of Baltimore II earlier this week, I was reminded of an event that took place in the harbor of Baltimore in the War of 1812. Hadn’t really “connected the dots” between this was and a distant relative.

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This is the type of flag that a ship like the Pride of Baltimore might have flown during the War of 1812.

Last summer, I was researching one “Ridgely Howard” using the Inferential Genealogy of family research. Later in my research, Ridgely Howard was really David Ridgely Howard.

His grandfather, John Edger Howard (1752-1827) and his wife Margret Chew (1760-1824) had a number of children, one of which was James Howard, Ridgely’s father and Charles Howard. Charles had 10 children, one of which was also Charles. This Charles married Elizabeth Phebe Key. She was the daughter of Frances Scott Key (1779-1843).

OK, it’s a stretch, but Frances Scott Key is the “Father-in-Law to my 10th Great Grand Uncle”


Montmorenci–Marie Conrad Lehr

June 17, 2012

Marie Conrad Lehr (1884-1921), was an owner of Montmorenci into the 1900’s, but is a Worthington Descendant. Found this newspaper article on her death:

BaltimoreSun-1921-06-07-Lehr_MarieConrad

Transcribed:

Baltimore Sun
June 7, 1921
Mortuary Notice

FUNERAL OF MRS LEHR TODAY

Body Placed In Memorial Chapel She Built Recently

Funeral services will be held at 4:30 o’clock this afternoon in Emmanuel Protestant Episcopal Church for Mrs. Marie Conrad Lehr, wife of Dr. Louis Charles Lehr, who died early yesterday of pneumonia at the home of the Misses Sally and Polly Carter, Washington Apartments. With a simple service, conducted by the Rev. Dr. Hugh Brickhead, the body was taken yesterday from the apartment and placed in the Memorial Chapel in Emmanuel Church that Mrs. Lehr built recently in memory of her mother, Mrs. Lawrence Lewis Conrad. Following the services in the church today the body will be taken to Montmorenci and interred in the old-family burying ground tomorrow.

Mrs. Lehr was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Lewis Conrad. Her mother was Miss Sally Howard Worthington, of Montmorenci, in Worthington Valley. On the paternal side Mrs. Lehr was a direct descendent of Nellie Curtis, daughter of Martha Washington. On November 9, 1909, Mrs. Lehr married Dr. Lehr, son of the late Robert Lehr, who died in 1887. The ceremony was performed at the Hotel Belvedere by the late Cardinal Gibbons, assisted by the late Rev. Francis X. Brady, president of Loyola College.

During the war Dr. Lehr served in France and Mrs. Lehr worked under Miss Anne Morgan on the committee for reconstruction work in France.

End:

June 7, 1921 Mortuary Notice for Marie Conrad Lehr, Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland.  Genealogy Bank.

There are a number of follow up items, on my ToDo list, about her and I know there are other newspaper articles, and another visit to Baltimore will need to be scheduled.

She isn’t the first one to have a note about being buried in “the old-family burying ground”. I have other notes, indicating that some have been moved from this burial ground to Saint John’s Episcopal Church Cemetery. Will have to see if she was one of those who was moved.

Of interest, is the notation what she is a descendant of Nellie Curtis, daughter of Martha Washington.

Lesson Learned: The study of this house, continues to show the impact of the people in this house to their neighborhood. Based on this article, once again there appears to be an impact on the Episcopal Church in the area. I suspect that this will be more obvious as time goes on.


Montmorenci–Samuel Worthington, Jr

June 16, 2012

Samuel Worthington, Jr – 1776 – 1811

 

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Mortuary Notice : December 12, 1811, Page 3, Column 2. Samuel Worthington – 1776 – 1811, Federal Gazette, Baltimore, Maryland.  Genealogy Bank.

Samuel Worthington Jr, Son of Samuel Worthington (1734 – 1815) and Mary Tolley Worthington (1740 – 1777) was born 23 Sep 1776 in Worthington Valley, Baltimore County, Maryland.

May have been buried at Montmorenci initially, be later moved to Saint Johns Episcopal Church Cemetery, Reisterstown (Worthington Valley).

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House History

June 15, 2012

Last evening, there was a presentation at the Second Life Association of Professional Genealogist (SL-APG) by mayrumblepois.

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May, is her Second Life name, and I will refer to her by that name. I can only say that she IS the House Historian.

Her presentation was about her passion in this line of research. She explained that WE, those around the “Fire Pit” (as seen above) have the skills to also be House Historians. The skills are very much the same, the types of records might be the same, but what we are looking for is not about People, but the physical house.

The biggest difference is audience, and WHERE the research is done. “May” reminded us that her research is very local. No travel, no conferences, and it’s not ‘family’ who will receive any questions or reports based on the information gathered.

I have talked to “May” in RL (Real Life) about this, and shared a story with her about a project that I had done in 2007. It was on a House, a historical one at that, and a bit of the journey that I had in a presentation that I had done on that house. I have blogged about “Montmorenci” in the past, have a continuing search for the reason for a “staircase” that is in the Maryland Montmorenci, and the discovery of another Montmorenci Staircase. That search continues, as well as some contact, based on this blog, about family members from “the other” Montmorenci. What contact was within the past month or so. The search continues.

I re-looked at a book that I created, in 2007, and gave to the owners at that time, to see what it would take to really do a House History on that house, based on the presentation last night.

I have notes that track the owners of that house, from the beginning, through 2007, I have notes from the surrounding area and the impact of the families who owned that house to that area (History of the area), so I might have the beginning of a House History for this specific house. In addition, the notion of researching in a “local” area, might not be true, in this case, but it would mean a visit to one or two repositories to gather the “missing” information that might be important for the history of the house, rather then the family history of the families who lived there.

During the presentation, that some of these houses do have “stories” of their own. Some to be told, others, maybe not. While I have been “Looking for ….” Montmorenci, I have one of those stories. In researching that mystery, I saw a number of other stories of events that took place in that house, so I know the information is “out there”.

Once again, May, “the House Historian”, I may be up to your challenge. I will blog about it here.

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