Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – 1890 Census Substitute

August 9, 2011

As I reviewed the Census for the various years, learning what information is added as each version of the Census progresses. Then running into 1890. What do you do to see where the family was in 1890. The households changed over time, where were they in 1890.

The first place, in a broader search, I remembered City Directories. Looking in the Baltimore City Directory, there is David R. Howard.

HowardDavidRiddgely-1890BaltimoreCityDirectory

The address, 939 St Paul, is consistent the previous and following Census Record.

Will then look for the other family members in the same City Directory. This will also help see household members who were in the 1880 Census, but not in the 1900 Census.

This is a reminder to Search Broadly.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Family Tracking

August 3, 2011

My friend and Genea-Blogger Dear MYRTLE had an interesting Blog recently.

Using custom report features of your genealogy program

In that blog entry, she had this question:

We are new to Genealogy and have Ancesrtry.com and Family Tree Maker.
This is a question that I am sure must have been answered a million times but we have not been able to find a solution doing Google searches. We would like to use Excel to help sort out what we know and don’t know from the tree that we have built so far.

Is there any software that will download an existing gedcom file onto an Excel spreadsheet?

I thought, that is exactly what I am doing for this project. So, why not share it here.

Since I know very little about David Ridgely Howard, I wanted to see if the Census Records could help me build what his family might look like, using Census Records, since other records were not helping me identify his parents. The census would help build households that my subject was in in various census years. Hopefully, one of them would give clues to his parents. As census years progress, relationships could be established within the Household. So, I wanted to build an EXCEL file, as was indicated in Dr. Tom Jones’ discussion on Inferential Genealogy.

Since I use Family Tree Maker, Version 2011, and the question was the same, here is how I created my EXCEL file. Please keep in mind that I didn’t start out with this file, but I had data in my genealogy program file.

The key for me was to use a feature of Family Tree Maker and that is for the program to assign, with some user control, a PersonID. I did that, and each PersonID will begin with DRH (David Ridgely Howard), there is a reason for me to do that, which is not important (yet). So that I can see the PersonID in my file AND in EXCEL.

In Family Tree Maker I went to the Publish Workspace, Person Collection, and selected Custom Report.

 

2011-IG-EXCEL-01

This will allow me to select the information that I want in EXCEL.

When I brought up the Custom Report the first ICON when that screen opens is Items to Include. Clicking on that ICON will bring up this screen.

2011-IG-EXCEL-02

I included the Name, PersonID, Birth, Marriage, and Death FACTS. I wanted the EXCEL file to have the Name format to be Last Name, First Name, Middle Name. As that will be the first column in EXCEL.

Selecting name, in the above screen, then Name Options, I select Last, First, Middle to get the output of the Name in the format I want.

Here is what that report looks like in Family Tree Maker. My subject is in the red box. All I have at this point is his Name, the PersonID that Family Tree Maker generated for me, Birth and Death Dates.

 

2011-IG-EXCEL-03

That’s a good start and will help generate an EXCEL file so that I can track the Census Records. I select Include All in the Right Hand Panel in the Publish Workspace for the Custom Report. (won’t show all of the Family Tree Maker screen, as that can be a topic of my other blog)

With that report on my display, I click on Share, and select Export to CSV, a format that EXCEL can read and understand.

2011-IG-EXCEL-04

I want the data to appear in Columns, That is one row per person. So the first button, is selected.

 

2011-IG-EXCEL-05

Once exported, you are given the option to Open the file. Here it is in EXCEL. You can see David listed. So, my data is now in EXCEL to do what I want. Maybe not in the format that I want, but the main pieces of information is there.

2011-IG-EXCEL-06

I made some changes in EXCEL, like moving the PersonID column from the 2nd column to the first column. Normal Cut / Paste features in EXCEL were used. I did, but really didn’t have to, split up the Name from one column to three. Over time, I knew that the exact wording of the names would change over time.

For David, he is DRH001, I changed DRH1 to DRH001, because of the way EXCEL sorts. I wanted the FACTS to be in a column followed by the Date of that Event (or Fact), followed by the State, Place that it occurred and a description as provided by Family Tree Maker.

All of this was a little extra work, but the Sorting in EXCEL and Filtering that you can do with EXCEL it was worth the extra time to reformat what Family Tree Maker had provided.

2011-IG-EXCEL-07

I knew the Birth and Death Dates for David, so I entered those Facts with Dates. In Family Tree Maker when a Census Record is used, the Residence FACT is used to record where the person was in the Census. Above you can see that I have gathered the 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, 1900, and 1910 Census, but haven’t found (yet) the 1920 Census. He died in 1927.

I added the Residence FACT dates If I hadn’t found them yet, so in looking at this spreadsheet I can tell I need to look for that.

Using the Sorting and Filtering capability of EXCEL I can see households over time. Who is in the household, who is not in the household, then later the Relationships.

I won’t post more about that, as what is really an EXCEL lesson or two, and that isn’t the purpose of this Blog.

I wanted to track females, over time, in Census Records. The first thing I did was to put a background color for them.

2011-IG-EXCEL-08

In this example, I do not know her birth Surname. For unknown names, I enter 5 underscores “_____”. I know her birth and death year AND when she got married. So, for the Census years before she was married, her surname has those 5 underscores. There are ways to find that information, but for this spreadsheet I wanted to be reminded visually that I need to look. Since she married a Howard, and I found her in the 1880 Census, just after her marriage, I changed her unknown surname to Howard. I know here death date, so I also have a visible reminder that I need to find her in those census records.

I thank Dear MYRLE for posting the question and I hope I have provided an answer to the question asked. I know that this spreadsheet, generated by Family Tree Maker has really helped me with this project.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Reward

July 24, 2011

In searching ‘broadly’, I decided that I would try to find more information about David Ridgely Howard’s C.S.A. Unit, the 1st Maryland Infantry, C.S.A. While visiting the National Civil War Museum in Harrisburg, PA, the 1st Maryland was there. I blogged about that here:

Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Search Broadly #6

Then

Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–CSA Unit Book

In the picture there are two books. The one I am reading is First and Second Maryland Infantry, C.S.A., by Robert J. Driver Jr, published by Willow Bend Books, 2003. (ISBN 1-58549-901-3)

The book talks about the history of this unit during the Civil War. There are details in the life of the unit, the conditions, places, interaction within the unit, and interaction within the locations where they were. It would appear that the author spent considerable amount of time reading letters and documentation written about the unit. Like my great-grandfather, Samuel Worthington, many soldiers wrote letters home, it would appear.

I have already posted the Civil War Records that are online and within the book.

Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Civil War Papers

Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Muster Rolls

and for David Ridgely Howard’s brother:

Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Muster Rolls #2

Really getting into this Civil War ‘thing’.

When I turned to page 204, who do I see, a picture of James M and David Ridgely Howard, in uniform.

Searching Broadly certainly has paid off in the pursuit of finding the Parents of David Ridgely Howard. Not sure I am closer to reaching my goal, but really have a better view of D.R. Howard and his family.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Muster Rolls #2

July 18, 2011

As a follow up to

Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Muster Rolls

That post was about David Ridgely Howard, but it referred to a brother. Here is that information.

First and Second Maryland Infantry
Muster Rolls

Page 445

HOWARD, JAMES MC HENRY

Pvt., Co. C(2nd), 1st Md. Inf. b. Baltimore 3/26/39. Att. St. James College & U of Va. Res. of Baltimore. Enl. Richmond 5/17/61. Ab. sick Strasburg 6/25-31/61. Ab. sick in camp near Centreville 10/29-31/61. Ab. on detached service at Haymarket 11-12/61. Discharged 6/23/52. Promoted Lt. Of Art. 6/24/62. Assigned as Acting Asst. Adjt General on staff of Col. T.S. Rhett, commanding the artillery defenses of Richmond 1862-63. Ord. Officer on Gen. Elzey’s staff, 5-7/64. Asst. Adjutant General on Gen. Stevens staff 8/64. May have served on the staffs of Gen.’s Nicholls, Hays and B.T. Johnson 1864. NFR. Emigrated to Canada 1865. M.D., Baltimore. Served in Engineer Corps, Baltimore, postwar. Lawyer. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association. d. Oakland, Md. 1/31/16. Believed bur. in the Old St. Paul’s Cem., Baltimore.

NFR: No further record

As with his brother, I have his Civil War records.

His venture to Canada wasn’t very long, as he is in the 1870 Census with David.

No further along to the Parents, but the Family is taking shape.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Muster Rolls

July 17, 2011

First and Second Maryland Infantry by Robert J. Driver Jr.
Muster Rolls
Page 444

HOWARD, DAVID RIDGELY.

Pvt. Co. A, 2nd Md. Inf. b. 1844. Res. of Baltimore. Enl. Richmond 8/21/62 age 18. WIA (flesh wound to thigh) Gettysburg 7/3/63. Paid 7/17/63. Ab. wounded in Charlottesville hospital 8/14-17/63. Transf. Richmond hospital. Returned to duty 9/63. Paid 1/11/64. Present 3/31/64. WIA (upper portion of right thigh amputated) Weldon R.T. 8/19/65. Ab. wounded in Richmond hospital 8/21/64. Retired to Invalid Corps 12/24/64. Paroled Charlottesville 5/1/65. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association 1910, res of Baltimore. d. 12/23/27. Bur. Green Mount Cem. Brother of James McHenry Howard, 1st Md. Inf.

I have seen this same information in his Civil War files. (still working on them). Going through this book is quite interesting. Will probably blog about the book later.

Wounded twice but still lived to be 83.

The James McHenry Howard is not the only brother who served in the First and Second Maryland Infantry. There are a couple of other names in this book that “are family”.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Where Else ?

July 11, 2011

In one of the items I looked at today, I ran across the location of a burial. Since I contribute to Find-A-Grave, I thought I would check out this cemetery. Also, I have visited a number of cemeteries in Baltimore County and surrounding counties in Maryland.

Low and behold, there was my ‘Revolutionary’ War person. Still working on a firm connection between David Ridgely Howard and General John Eager Howard I think this may be the link between the two pieces of this branch of my tree.

HowardJohnEdgar-FindAGrave-01

General John Eager Howard (1752 – 1827). Former Governor of Maryland. Even ran for Vice President of the United States.

Will probably post more information about this gentleman if I am able to prove that there is a connection between him and David Ridgely Howard.

Find-A-Grave has been or is a good resource of information. I was certainly not disappointed when I looked at Find-A-Grave. There was a lot of text on the page for the general. Right there was a hint for other places to look.

One of the nice things about Find-A-Grave, especially if a genealogist has posted information with the memorial, is to provide links to other family members. Looking at this one page, gave me hints for 3 generations.

More names to put into the puzzle, more common surnames with some of the females, all early Maryland surnames.

I am hoping for another visit to Baltimore to visit the cemetery and probably another visit to the Maryland Historical Society and Library. Really would like to translate the Census locations to the real, current, world locations.

It was a good reminder to look at websites like Find-A-Grave for information. Some times, like this one, had dates and relationships in the data that might be on a headstone. I know that as a contributor to Find-A-Grave, I have helped others and this time someone really helped me.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – What next ?

July 10, 2011

While I wait for a couple of Civil War books to arrive, I wanted to step back to see what I had.

Over the past several days, I have been looking at Census Records from 1850 – 1900 to see what I could find as I build this family in hopes that I would find the Parents of David Ridgely Howard.

The biggest help to date is this 1880 Census Record. The first census that included relationships.

This is the household of William R. Howard.

1880-CensusRecord-HowardHousehold

David is at the bottom and listed as Brother to William R. The 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1900 Census included some of this same siblings and family members. Over these census records, some come and some go. Had to build an EXCEL spreadsheet to track this “family”. I am continuing to track these individuals and identify their relationships.

To date, the only ‘hint’ to David’s parents is that his parents, both of them, were born in Maryland. His siblings census records confirm that each time I look at them.

It would appear that David’s siblings, other than William remained single. It also appears that William ran a Flower Store, guessing in Baltimore, as he is listed twice as a Merchant and once a Flower merchant.

The funny piece about this research is that I worked very close to where this household was, at least in one census record that reported the street and house number.

Remembering Dr. Jones’ task two, it Search Broadly. What have I missed? It’s obvious to me that the census is not going to get me there.

Summarizing where I am, I checked some of my early research notes, looking for what I haven’t look yet. There is was, the comment in the Gettysburg presentation that James Walllace and Ridgely Howard’s grandparents served in the Revolutionary War. Yes, I have questioned the number of generations back, but I am not counting that number yet.

So, off to see if I can find any Revolutionary War records for any Howards in Baltimore. I know, in advance from other research that I will find a a couple. Another set of records that I haven’t looked at closely before.

Isn’t this fun ???


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