Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Muster Rolls

July 17, 2011

First and Second Maryland Infantry by Robert J. Driver Jr.
Muster Rolls
Page 444

HOWARD, DAVID RIDGELY.

Pvt. Co. A, 2nd Md. Inf. b. 1844. Res. of Baltimore. Enl. Richmond 8/21/62 age 18. WIA (flesh wound to thigh) Gettysburg 7/3/63. Paid 7/17/63. Ab. wounded in Charlottesville hospital 8/14-17/63. Transf. Richmond hospital. Returned to duty 9/63. Paid 1/11/64. Present 3/31/64. WIA (upper portion of right thigh amputated) Weldon R.T. 8/19/65. Ab. wounded in Richmond hospital 8/21/64. Retired to Invalid Corps 12/24/64. Paroled Charlottesville 5/1/65. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association 1910, res of Baltimore. d. 12/23/27. Bur. Green Mount Cem. Brother of James McHenry Howard, 1st Md. Inf.

I have seen this same information in his Civil War files. (still working on them). Going through this book is quite interesting. Will probably blog about the book later.

Wounded twice but still lived to be 83.

The James McHenry Howard is not the only brother who served in the First and Second Maryland Infantry. There are a couple of other names in this book that “are family”.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – What next ?

July 10, 2011

While I wait for a couple of Civil War books to arrive, I wanted to step back to see what I had.

Over the past several days, I have been looking at Census Records from 1850 – 1900 to see what I could find as I build this family in hopes that I would find the Parents of David Ridgely Howard.

The biggest help to date is this 1880 Census Record. The first census that included relationships.

This is the household of William R. Howard.

1880-CensusRecord-HowardHousehold

David is at the bottom and listed as Brother to William R. The 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1900 Census included some of this same siblings and family members. Over these census records, some come and some go. Had to build an EXCEL spreadsheet to track this “family”. I am continuing to track these individuals and identify their relationships.

To date, the only ‘hint’ to David’s parents is that his parents, both of them, were born in Maryland. His siblings census records confirm that each time I look at them.

It would appear that David’s siblings, other than William remained single. It also appears that William ran a Flower Store, guessing in Baltimore, as he is listed twice as a Merchant and once a Flower merchant.

The funny piece about this research is that I worked very close to where this household was, at least in one census record that reported the street and house number.

Remembering Dr. Jones’ task two, it Search Broadly. What have I missed? It’s obvious to me that the census is not going to get me there.

Summarizing where I am, I checked some of my early research notes, looking for what I haven’t look yet. There is was, the comment in the Gettysburg presentation that James Walllace and Ridgely Howard’s grandparents served in the Revolutionary War. Yes, I have questioned the number of generations back, but I am not counting that number yet.

So, off to see if I can find any Revolutionary War records for any Howards in Baltimore. I know, in advance from other research that I will find a a couple. Another set of records that I haven’t looked at closely before.

Isn’t this fun ???


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–CSA Unit Book

July 9, 2011

In my search for David Ridgely Howard, I took a picture of a couple of books at the National Civil War Museum in Harrisburg, PA. I found one of the books on the Heritage Books Website.

Reference Books

The First and Second Maryland Infantry, CSA

I think there will be some useful information in one or both of these books about my subject. Will this lead me to who his parents are? Don’t know. But, it will help find out some of his stories while in this unit. Perhaps, why or how he got from Baltimore, Maryland to join the C.S.A. Have ready seen some hints that he was in Richmond, Virginia. Of note is the reference to Culp’s Hill and the Weldon Railroad. Culp’s Hill is an easy find, but like my Civil War hero (re-enactor) told me, the smaller battles are mostly unknown. My searching for that latter battle, hasn’t found much. Only that he was shot in that battle, for the 2nd time, perhaps.

TheFirstandSecondMarylandInfantry-D0901

The First and Second Maryland Infantry, C.S.A. - Robert J. Driver, Jr. the First Maryland Infantry was formed from Marylanders who chose to cast their lot with the Confederacy against a Union government that had invaded their state and established martial law, forcing those who disagreed with the invasion of the South to join the Confederates or to submit to what they considered as tyranny. Organized at Harpers Ferry, they fought in the first battle of the war at Bull Run, and distinguished themselves for their valor. The Marylanders fought in the Shenandoah Valley under Jackson, bringing new honors to their fame.

During the Seven Day Campaign they made an outstanding charge across open fields to help break the Union lines at Gaines’s Mill. Disbanded in 1862, they quickly reorganized and gathered new recruits to become the Second Maryland Infantry. These gallant Marylanders defended the Shenandoah Valley during the winter of 1862-63, and then fought in the battle of Winchester in 1863. Joining Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, they charged up Culp’s Hill on July 2-3, losing half their number. In June 1864, the Marylanders charged without orders and closed a gap in the Confederate lines at Cold Harbor. Defending Petersburg, they were in several counterattacks to recover the Weldon Railroad. During the winter of 1864-65 the Marylanders were constantly called on for picket duty, while others around them deserted. They fought to the last at Petersburg in April 1865, and the survivors surrendered at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. 2003, 6×9, cloth, index, 581 pp.
D0901
ISBN: 1585499013

Book is ordered.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Civil War Book

July 7, 2011

As the quest to follow the steps outlined in the Inferential Genealogy process, I am looking into sources that I might not have done in the past.

My order from Amazon.com arrived today. Two books, but not the two I wanted. But one of them helped to make the connection in the Gettysburg program on the History Channel.

The Book, Gettysburg – Culp’s Hill & Cemetery Hill, by Harry W. Pfanz (1993) puts Col. James Wallace and D. Ridgely Howard together in this book. What it points out that former “neighbors” were fighting each other on the battlefield.

The point in the story where they were at the same place at the same time, D. Ridgely Howard had been wounded on Culp’s Hill and had a broken leg. The Union soldiers were approaching him, and being taken, he was asked “What made you so brave?” along with other questions, including “Do you know that you are fighting your own men?” meaning fellow Marylanders, and Howard replied, “Yes, and we intend to fight them.”

He was being questioned by the 1 Maryland Regiment, Eastern Shore. The regiment commander was Col. James Wallace. He is reported to say “sorrowfully gathered up many of our old friends & acquaintances [from the Confederate battalion], & had them carefully & tenderly cared for.”


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Civil War Papers

July 6, 2011

In Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Search Broadly #7  I mentioned that I had found some Civil War records. Have only heard about them, but not seen them. Up until today, no matter where I looked, I could not find David Ridgely Howard anywhere related to the Civil War. I was beginning to question if everyone in the Civil War would be found in the Civil War records. The fact that I have seen two indications that he had been wounded, not once but, twice, I thought for sure I would find something.

Well I did. 20 pages of documents on Footnote.com.

He enlisted August 21, 1862 in Richmond, Virginia by Capt R. B Winder for “3 yrs or war”.

Company Muster Rolls were included, including “Sep & Oct, 1864″. He was absent with remarks of “Wounded on Weldon R.R. Aug 19, 1864″. This confirms one wounding that I have found.

Then there were three Hospital Muster Rolls, so I can follow him through the hospitals. Then there was the Medical Directors Office record. “Aug, 19, 1864 – vs flesh upper ext portion left thigh” and was put on furlough for 60 days. The next record told us why. “G.S. amputation right lef flesh upper est portion of thigh”.

So, more details are here but there are two major questions still “on the table”

1) was he wounded at Gettysburg

2) why did he enlist in Richmond

Back to the books that I have picked up and waiting arrival to find the story of how he got from Baltimore to Washington, and now to Richmond. My Civil War re-enactor friend gave me some hints and hoping that one of this sources helps fill in the blanks.

Lots of data entry into my genealogy software. Am working on creating his Civil War Timeline that are now documented by these Civil War Pension files.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Search Broadly #7

July 6, 2011

Been waiting for a couple of books on the Civil War. Can’t say patiently, but waiting.

Up until this point, I had not entered any information into my genealogy database. Trying to stick to “the rules”. Then I realized that there were no rules on this, and since I heavily rely on my database, I thought I would start entering data into it.

When back to my first blog post:

Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Stated Goal

 

I then did a quick internet search, from within my program and FOUND D. R. Howard’s Civil War Pension file. 20 pages of it. Lots of information to enter and review. Information that I have been gathering and have found may be confirmed in this file.

 

Details to follow.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life – Search Broadly #6

June 26, 2011

Busy day for this project yesterday.

How neat is this. An encampment by the 1st Maryland Battalion, CSA at the National Civil War Museum.

D. Ridgely Howard, from all indications was a member of this Battalion. The quest for the visit to the Museum was to talk to the re-enactors from this unit.

The battle at Gettysburg that started my on this quest, using Inferential Genealogy, was Culps Hill. It may have been mentioned in the program, but it didn’t make it to my notes. The information, to date, indicates that D. Ridgely Howard was wounded in this battle. I have other sources that point to this, don’t have them in hand to read. Hopefully a small Civil War Bookstore will come through for me on this.

But, my question was more WHY would a Baltimore resident choose to join a Confederate army. Who might share that story.

This gentleman told me the story of why D. Ridgely Howard might head south to join the C.S.A. I have some reference material to confirm his story. Will post that story much later.

The apple in his hand was just shot in a demonstration of what would happen to an apple when shot by one of those rifles at 6 inches. Burned on one side, but the apple was OK to eat on the other.

My hats off to this gentleman, because in real life, he was a Vietnam Veteran, 2 tours of duty, and shot in Vietnam. His first tour was at the same time that I was there.

We shared, briefly, our real life stories as well as the Civil War stories. I am only sorry that I didn’t get his Civil War name, nor his real life name.

Thank you for your story (stories).

So, this concept of Search Broadly is helping me to find the story of D. Ridgely Howard.

Stay Tuned


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