52 Weeks of Abundant Genealogy – Life Experiences

February 8, 2012

From Genea-Bloggers:

Week 5 – Life Experiences: Sometimes the challenges in life provide the best learning experiences. Can you find an example of this in your own family tree? Which brick wall ancestor are you most thankful for, and how did that person shape your family history experience?

This challenge runs from Sunday, January 29, 2012 through Saturday, February 3, 2012.

52 Weeks of Abundant Genealogy by Amy Coffin is a series of weekly blogging prompts (one for each week of 2012) that invite genealogists and others to discuss resources in the genealogy community including websites, applications, libraries, archives, genealogical societies and more. You do not have to be a blogger to participate. If you do not have a genealogy blog, write down your thoughts on your computer, or simply record them on paper and keep them with your files.

52-Weeks-Abundant

Sorry for running late on this, but it’s been a long, busy couple of days. Am finally catching up.

Being a RootsTech 2012, in Salt Lake City, was a real boost for me. The best part of the trip was to be able to spend time with Genea-Bloggers. I didn’t try to keep count as to how many of the 90+ Genea-Bloggers who were there that I met, but I think I met most of them. What an awesome group.

I have never been a writer, so this blogging “stuff” is out of my league. However, there are a couple of folks in my family tree who were writers, perhaps not by trade, but did a lot of writing.

My Great-Grandfather, Samuel Worthington, was one of them. I have copies of letters that he wrote “home” during the Civil War. Apparently, he also was a writer for his unit in the Civil War and was published in Ohio.

The second writer, was McHenry Howard. A little distant relative, but his writings provided a lot of detail for the 2nd Maryland Regiment (CSA), again for the Civil War. His writings gave detailed information on that regiment that put in perspective what a soldier’s life was like during that conflict.

But the real hero, for me, was my grandfather’s brother, Josiah Wistar Worthington, Col. V.C., U.S.A. His stories and letters are now in book format Hell and Beyond, a Diary of War and Captivity, Compiled and Edited by Frances Worthington Lipe.

This book is full of Uncle Wistar’s letters “home” telling his story of his captivity during the 2nd World War. He had been captured twice, and the poems, in the letters, helped communicate his experience without those letters being destroyed because of the content of them.

These three writers, brought home, their experience of their war to those their families. My experience of “war” was sent home in the form of audio tapes that I had sent home while I was in Vietnam. One of these days, I’ll have to get them put into digital format.


Watch what you Wish For

December 24, 2011

Today we celebrated Christmas with my daughter, her husband, and three of the cutest “grandpups” “this side of the Mississippi”. OK, this side of the Delaware.

Some time ago, and I don’t even remember doing this, I put a book on one of those “Wish List” websites. I can’t tell you when I last visited it, but I did. Anyway, I got two books, one of which was on my wish list.
“Doctors In Blue”. The subtitle was ‘The Medical History of the Union Army in the Civil War”.

Why on earth a “medical book”? Oh yeah, Civil War. If you have been following that blog, you might note that I now have some interest in the Civil War. Medical? Don’t think so.

Oh, but what about the Sanitarium I had been looking for, where my Grandfather worked. Maybe that’s it.

I my have had question marks on my forehead or something, because Carrie said “you had it on your wish list”.

But her next question got my attention. “Are we related to the Author”? WHO? was my answer. George WORTHINGTON Adams. My next answer “no clue”.

As I have gotten into the habit of carrying my iPad2, I fired it up with the Ancestry AP and brought up my tree. Nope, not here.

But her question took me to Google search, and entered his name. Found what I was looking for. Who he was and what he did. A couple of hits down the list what what looked to be the beginning of a Family Tree. Hmmmm… Do YOU have your Tree Online? was the first thing that came to mine. Sure enough, I figured he would have been, probably one generation before I found the Worthington surname, which I did. Follow that back to Charles Worthington b: 1701.

THAT’s OUR Charles Worthington, was my reply.

Carrie and Patrick were on their way to see Patrick’s Uncle Ralph. Now Uncle Ralph and I have some things in common. One of which is that we were both in Vietnam about the same time, have been known to visit cemeteries. He captures some great stuff with pencil and paper, I try with a camera (with or with out film).

One of his Christmas presents was the same book that I got, and another Worthington (related) book that I had probably given to Carrie, but it was also about the Civil War.

As Carrie has also done some family history research, she asked my “and how are WE related” to “them”. The Them was the author of the TWO books.

Carrie had joined us in the opening of the Worthington Trail, at the Monocacy Battlefield, just south of Frederick, Maryland. One of the farms, where this battle took place, was a Worthington Farm. I have posted about there here before. One of the people that lived in that house, as the time of the Civil War Battle wrote a book about his experience. Fighting for Time; The Battle that Saved Washington, by Judge Glenn Howard Worthington.

Having my genealogy online I gave here our ancestry back to the common ancestor for Judge Worthington.

Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701)
John Worthington 1689-1763
John Worthington 1728-1790
James Worthington1772-1854
John H Worthington 1793-1858
John Thomas Worthington 1826-1905
(Judge) Glenn Howard Worthington 1858-1934
(author Fighting for Time)

That’s one book.

The Doctors in Blue looks like this.

Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701)
Charles Worthington 1701-1774
Samuel Worthington 1746-1821
James Worthington 1779-1813
Thomas Worthington 1801-1888
George Balford Worthington 1846-1895
Minna Worthington 1870-1949
George Worthington Adams 1905-1981
(author Doctors in Blue)

John and Charles were brothers. John the oldest, Charles the youngest.

But, where are WE?

Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701)
Charles Worthington 1701-1774

John Worthington 1733 -1803
Samuel Worthington 1785-1853
Henry Wilson Worthington 1815-1866
Samuel Worthington 1843-1897
Henry Russell Worthington 1887 – 1953
Henry Russell Worthington Jr 1916-2006

We also are descendants of Charles Worthington (1701-1774)

Uncle Ralph will be impressed??? (don’t think so) But wait, Carrie, Patrick and Uncle Ralph are going to the town where another of my ancestors lived, the Whitall House.

One more genealogy report.

Samuel Worthington (1843-1897) was married to:

Sarah Catherine Reeve 1849-1894
Job Whitall Reeve 1800-1861
Hannah Whitall 1775-1832
Job Whitall 1743-1798
James Whitall 1717-1808 Ann Cooper 1716-1797
(Owners of Whitall house during revolutionary war)

Uncle Ralph’s wife keeps reminding me that my ancestors are everywhere. Yup, even in her own neighborhood.

Guess I better be more careful for what I wish for. Another branch to research. That makes three. Two going back to the Civil War. That’s two in two weeks. Guess I know what I will be doing in 2012.

Uncle Ralph, Enjoy your new books.


Inferential Genealogy–Genealogy Software

November 14, 2011

As you may have guessed by now, most of what I have been doing is inputting all of this collected information into a Genealogy software package. There are many choices, but I have been using the Family Tree Maker program for a number of years. I have shared a couple of outputs from that program for this project, and here is a link to another feature I used.

Civil War Map

What was demonstrated in that Blog, was how I created a Map of the various battles that the 2nd Infantry Regiment, Maryland fought in.

2012-Place-Person-Map

Each of the squares is a battle location. In the database is details on each of the battles, but this gives me an idea of how far they traveled.


Inferential Genealogy–Another Record set

November 13, 2011

I just posted the results of looking at another Record Set (Exhausted Research) for this project. This time, it was on the military unit the David Ridgely Howard Served in.

Instead of duplicating the blog, here is a link to the blog post.

Military History in FTM2012

I ended the post with this:

The point of this, for me, was to have a view in the Ancestry Member Tree, and in FTM2012, an overview of this Civil War Regiment. When reviewing my Civil War hero, and his dates,  I have a good idea what battles he fought in.

He enlist on August 21, 1862, but into the 1st Regiment Maryland, so would have been in the initial organization of the 2nd Regiment. He was wounded on July 3, 1963 at the Battle of Culp’s Hill. This would have put him at the battle of Centreville and Winchester, Virginia and the first day’s battle in Gettysburg for this unit on July 2.

He missed the Battle at Martinsburg, but returned to the battle at Cold Harbor, Virginia.

He was wounded on the 2nd date’s battle at Weldon Railroad, Virginia and would be out of the rest of the war, as he lost his leg in Weldon Railroad battle.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Side Story

October 30, 2011

In continuing research on this family, My Relatives, I found a ‘timely’ hero. Timely in our history, as we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War.

Keeping any eye on Surnames that show up as middle names, Key was one of those names. Francis Scott Key is now included in this file.

But, did you know, that a son of Francis Scott Key was murdered?

Philip Barton Key II (1818 – 1859) was shot and killed by a congressman, Daniel E. Sickles in Lafayette Square in Washington, DC. Sickles would later be a General in the Union army.

There is more to that story, but I thought I would share that story here now.

You just never know what you might find during your research.


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