Video of the Civil War

March 22, 2014

Facebook strikes again.

I had an invite to Friend someone on Facebook. I didn’t know the name, but one of the surnames I knew, Worthington. The location was Mt Airy, Maryland. I know that place and already have a Facebook friend there.

Of course, I friended. What I saw was awesome, a link to a Video

Heart of the Civil War

Last summer I visited Frederick, Maryland for the celebration of Special Order 191. While watching this video, those orders were shown as well as one of the speakers in the video. I had met on that visit.

What was interesting about this visit and the video was my question about why Fredrick was “Union Friendly” while Baltimore, a mere 30-40 miles east was “not so much”. The video helped clarify that issue, including why Maryland was a “border state” and didn’t decide which side they were on.

This past fall, I had the chance to visit Monocacy with another cousin, DearMYRTLE. I didn’t take any pictures on my camera on that visit. My bad.

A book was written by Judge Glenn Howard Worthington that told the story of the battle that took place on his “front lawn”.

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Judge Glenn Howard Worthington’s grandson, David Reed and a National Park Service Ranger are in the place where the Judge watched that battle.

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The front of the house in 1999 when a gathering of Worthington’s supported David Reed as he opened the Worthington Walking Trail in the National Battlefield.

Another visit, but with a little snow on the ground, but the porch had been reattached.

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ca 1900

About 42 minutes  into the video, was the story of the Battle at Monocacy, the battle that “Saved Washington”. The video tells the story of Glenn Worthington. I have seen that basement. In fact the picture I have above, is that same place.

So cool to watch the story that has your “family” mentioned.

Oh, the new Facebook Friend, is a relative of Judge Glenn Howard Worthington as well.

Social Media at work (again). Thank you Paula


Civil War Registration but NO Service Records

July 15, 2013

I have blogged about this non-genealogy database management software program before. Evidentia.

Unlike those programs, it’s not about names, dates, and places, but about Sources or containers of Information.

A friend of mine gave me two pieces of paper and asked me to look up her “peeps” on Fold3.com. The print outs were from a Civil War Registration book. She wanted to know more about these to people and the Civil War. I can do this, Fold3.com here I come.

I had the Name, residence, age as of 1 July 1863, born in New York. I wanted to start with me finding the same document that she gave me. Found it, using Ancestry.com’s new search, very quickly, and there he was on line 6.

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Name: James A Wake
Residence: New York
Class: 2
Congressional District: 6th
Age on 1 July 1863: 36
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1827
Race: White
Place of Birth: New York

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It said the he was a Foreman.

The other person was similar, but 2 years younger and in different Congressional District.

I hadn’t seen this type of ledger book before, and didn’t even realize there was such a book. Very nice find. This should be easy.

Fold3.com, next stop. I tried searching for both James Wake and George Hendrickson. No luck in the Civil War Service Records, so I then used the Browse feature, working my way down the various options. Nothing. How can this be.

As an aside, I am struggling with Chapter 3 of Mastering Genealogical Proof book by Dr Thomas Jones and “Reasonably Exhaustive” Research.

Then I remembered a lesson that I heard a number of times, to understand the records you are looking for or seeing, to discover what they were created for and what might you find on that record collection. Back to Ancestry, found the record, then scrolled down to the page to the “About” collection name. Here is the link to this specific collection:

http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1666&enc=1

So, putting this collection into history, the page says in part.

About U.S., Civil War Draft Registrations Records, 1863-1865

This is a collection of lists of Civil War Draft Registrations. There were four drafts between 1863 and 1865, which included 3.175 million records. Historically, the 1863 draft was one of the most tenuous moments in the Union outside of the battles fought on Northern soil. Most of the concern was due to the draft riots that took place in New York in 1863.

Note the date just before the AGE, 1863. Yeah, OK, but that doesn’t tell me why I didn’t find these two gentlemen in the Civil War Service collection on Fold3.com. Since I was on Ancestry.com, I looked there too. Nothing.

I did my collecting of ‘normal’ information, all sounded straight forward, BUT, there is a CLASS column. The younger one had Class 1, the older, by 2 years, had Class 2.

Back to the information about the collection.

The records are split into two different classes, Class I are those aged 20-35 as well as those 36-45 and unmarried. Class II is everyone else that registered.

The younger one was 34 as of 1 July 1863 and married, the older was 36, also married. So, the classification was correct.

Maybe the reason they didn’t show up in the Service Records is that they didn’t sign up. This was only a Registration.

It appears that one was over the age limit, with the second approaching 35, and both married.

What was the question that was posed to me? Would you find the Civil War Records for these two people? We have to have a question to answer, or why would we be searching.

My current hypothesis is that they did NOT serve in the Civil War.

Did I do an “exhaustive research”, probably NO, but there are clues, for me, that they did not serve. The full step in the Genealogical Proof Standard has the word “reasonably” in front of it.

That doesn’t mean that I am not going to stop searching, but only putting that question aside for now. I don’t consider it a brick wall, but there must be a story here somewhere. It also doesn’t mean that I won’t re-ask that question as new information is found.

Why these two names, don’t appear to be related, both from New York, but that is about it. Oh, yes, my friend. There must be a connection there somewhere.

That may be a story for another blog post.

Guessing there is more, I am entering this data, from the Source Document, into Evidentia.

Source Information

Ancestry.com. U.S., Civil War Draft Registrations Records, 1863-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010., accessed 12 July 2014.

Original data:

Consolidated Lists of Civil War Draft Registrations, 1863-1865. NM-65, entry 172, 620 volumes. ARC ID: 4213514. Records of the Provost Marshal General’s Bureau (Civil War), Record Group 110. National Archives, Washington D.C.


Civil War–150 Years Later and Ridgely Howard

July 3, 2013

My cousin, Dear MYRTLE, made a comment on Facebook about the Civil War and that she and Mr. Myrt were watching a program on Gettysburg. Last night, I found a link to a program on Gettysburg online, so I decided to watch this 88 minute program.

http://www.history.com/shows/gettysburg/videos/gettysburg?m=5189717d404

What I didn’t realize, until about 50 minutes into this program, that I had seen this program before. I knew that I had from how the program was done, but didn’t connect the dots as to what this program was about.

“Ridgely Howard” was mentioned, as a 33 year old, slave holder from Baltimore and that his grandfather served with George Washington during the War of Revolution, and that this family was of the “plantation class”. I know this guy. I spend a summer researching Ridgely Howard trying to find out who he was.

I did a series of blog posts on my search for Ridgely Howard:

http://worthy2be.wordpress.com/tag/2nd-life/

There may be a couple of blog posts in that series that is not about this research, but about the 3rd blog post is the end, at that time, of my search.

It turns out that David Ridgely Howard (1844 – 1927) was my 5th cousin, 4 times removed.

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I was reminded about James Wallace, whose grandfather served in the same regiment as did Ridgely Howards grandfather with George Washington.

What I didn’t catch the first time, was that David Ridgely Howards house has been reported to be haunted. I’ll have to look into that.

After Ridgely was wounded, on this day, in the morning of 3 July 1863, he would return and be wounded a second time, but this time he lost a leg. The amazing thing is that he lived until 1927.

 

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Robert J Driver Jr, First & Second Maryland C.S.A. (Bowie, Maryland:  Heritage Books, Inc, 2003), page 205 – Capt. James McHenry Howard (left), 1st Maryland Infantry, and his brother David Ridgely Howard, Co A, 2nd Maryland Infantry, were photographed in Canada in their Confederate uniform at at the war’s end. David has a metal “cross button” pinned to his breast, which is believed to have been the insignia of the Maryland Line (see Plate H2, Dave Mark Collection).  H. R. Worthington – Book Shelf


Special Orders #191, the Lost Orders

September 10, 2012

A month or so ago, I posted this: 

Planned Weekend Trip – Day 1

It was a day trip, for me, to be in Frederick, Maryland to hear more about Special Orders #191. I went and had a great time. I learned a lot, not only about what happened to the Lost Orders, but why it was important to the Civil War.

The National Park Service, just posted a YouTube Video about Special Order #191

Special Orders 191

 

There was a lecture on the topic, and a panel discussion by three Civil War Historians. In attendance were descendants of the two gentlemen who discovered these orders.

I won’t go into the details, but what is important to me, and why I spend the day driving, was that the Monocacy National Battlefield has, within it’s borders a Worthington House.

I got to see the actual paper that these orders were written on, as seen in the video and are on display at the battlefield, but to be WHERE they were found. Or at least the area. That was close enough for me.

 

What I learned from that visit, was not so much about the orders themselves, but more about what I learned from the Inferential Genealogy study that I did “in Second Life”. You may recall I mentioned two people, at the Battle of Gettysburg, who fought against each other and that their Grandfathers fought with George Washington. Brother against Brother took on a new, real, meaning for me.

Author Dennis E. Frye, September Suspense, Lincoln’s Union in Peril” was the presenter and was on the panel, described Frederick, Maryland during the time of the Civil War. What surprised me, was that Frederick was “Union” friendly. Knowing that Baltimore was 50 miles (plus or minus) away, but was a “split town”, as was Maryland, split between the North and South. The study I did was on Confederate’s during the Civil War. Why were towns, so close together in my mind, so far apart at the time of the Civil War.

I had a chance to ask Mr. Frye about this. What he explained to me, was that the settlers of Frederick were Welsh and had come down to this part of Maryland from the port of Philadelphia and not the port of Baltimore. Knowing the Philadelphia area, and a bit of it’s history, that all made sense to me. Having just driven from northern New Jersey to Frederick that morning, it made total sense.

The lecture was fantastic. He told the STORY of Special Orders #191, “including citations”. Of course a Historian would have citations, but the reading of the articles he quoted helped put the “story” into a real place. His book has 23 pages of End Notes, and 6 pages of Bibliographical information.

The Panel included two other Civil War historians. The moderator took questions from the audience and asked the panel, in turn, to answer the questions. That is when the discussion became interesting, as each historian, had their own interpretation of the data from their studies.


Fort McHenry, Maryland

August 10, 2012

Last weekend’s “day trip” became two Day Trips. Unfortunately, Patti was not up to the trip, but we agreed that I would make the trip to Frederick, Maryland and the celebration of Special Orders 191 (will blog later on that). Our plan was to spend the night, visit Worthington Valley, then proceed to the Worthington Reunion. (already blogged about that).

It was hot, but there was time.

Since doing my research last summer (Inferential Genealogy), I wanted to Visit Fort McHenry.

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The Howard family played a role at Fort McHenry early in the Civil War. While doing that research I realized that Frances Scott Key was in my family file. I had known of other Worthington / Key interactions in the past. There is a house in Anne Arundel County that belonged to Key and Worthington. (but that’s another story).

As you may be able to tell from the above picture, that is was a beautiful day. Fort McHenry has programs in the evenings on the weekends, War of 1812 Twilight Tattoo. Why not …. it gave me a chance to re-visit the Fort, as it’s been a number of years since I last was there AND had no pictures. Great day to visit and to that Pictures.

As may have been a tradition at Fort McHenry, in the evening, there was a gathering of the troops (Tattoo), and as was presented this evening, a band was there, along with the local “ladies”.

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The Chesapeake Concert Band and the Fort McHenry Fife & Drum Corps played for those in attendance.

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Period music was presented, including some music specifically created for Fort McHenry.

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The Traditional Canon Salute was included in the ceremony.

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So why all the fuss about Fort McHenry and Frances Scott Key? According to my database, he was the Father-in-law of my 10th Great Grand Uncle. What ??? OK, he’s distant, but still related. Looking at HOW we are related, I run into TWO, not one, but TWO Revolutionary War “Hero’s”. As reported on this Blog, John Eager Howard, grandfather of David Ridgely Howard and McHenry Howard, of Civil War fame, but also Ann Cooper Whitall, wife of James Whitall. (The Battle at Red Bank, New Jersey).

The Whitall House it across the Delaware River from Fort Mott. Another visit to the Whitall House is in order.

In this one line, I have Revolutionary War, War of 1812, and the Civil War hero’s.

 

More Photo’s can be found here:


Planned Weekend Trip – Day 1

August 1, 2012

There is a “family reunion” this weekend in Darlington, Maryland. I have not been to this reunion before and don’t know what to expect.

We had planned to go to the National Battlefield at Monocacy, Maryland to attend the “Return of Special Orders 191” presentation and new exhibit. Not sure what to expect there either, but Civil War, Monocacy, why not go find out.

When the reunion information came out in a Newsletter that I receive and knowing this area of Maryland, it has become a weekend trip. Unlike some of the day trips that I have made in the past. But this one will be a “three for…”.

Between Monocacy and Darlington is another Worthington family location in Worthington Valley. I’ll post more about that location later. But the plan is to go to Monocacy, stay over night, go to church at Saint John’s Episcopal Church (Western Run) in Glyndon, then head to Darlington.

I have posted a number of items on this blog about Monocacy.

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I blogged about this a couple of weeks ago.

The Battle of Monocacy–148 Year Ago

In this battle, some orders were issue by Confederate General Robert E. Lee, but they were lost, but later found by a Union soldier. The event on Saturday is a special event and exhibit at the Battlefield.

More information can be found here:

http://www.nps.gov/mono/parknews/return_so_191.htm

As mentioned before, part of this battle took place on the Worthington Farm.

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To help put this farm into my family tree, here is a descendant chart from my ancestor, Captain John Worthington (1650 – 1701) to the owners of the Worthington Farm.

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Because the chart may not be readable:

Descendants of Capt John and Sarah Howard Worthington
John Worthington, Jr 1689 – 1763
John Worthington III 1728 – 1790
James Worthington 1772 – 1854
John Henry H Worthington 1793 – 1858
John Thomas Worthington 1828 – 1905
Glenn Howard Worthington 1858 – 1934

The farm was owned by John Thomas Worthington. John Worthington, Jr, was the oldest son of Capt. John and Sarah.

Of note, if you have been following this blog, Howard shows up again, in the final entry above, Glenn Howard Worthington.

I had met the grandson of Glenn Howard Worthington a couple of times, include in 1999 when a hiking trail at the Worthington Farm was dedicated. He, David Reed, has since passed away.

Looking forward to this event and exhibit, and finding more about this important battle of the Civil War.


The Battle of Monocacy–148 Year Ago

July 8, 2012

It’s called the Battle that Saved Washington.

July 7, 2012, the National Park Service celebrated the Battle of Monocacy that took place on July 9, 1864. It was to have been a two day event, but the temperature was in the 90’s, so they backed it off to one day. Monocacy is a couple of miles south of Frederick, Maryland.

So what was it like in 1864? Don’t know, as I haven’t found any temperature readings for that date and place, but there was much to be learned about this battle.

There were three farms along the Monocacy River, where this battle took place. One on the North side of the river, the Best Farm, Two on the South, the Thomas and Worthington Farms.

The Best Farm:

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The Thomas Farm:

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And the Worthington Farm:

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The owner of this farm was John Thomas Worthington (1826-1905) who is my 4th Cousin, 3 Times Removed. His ancestor was the oldest son of Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701), while my ancestor was the youngest son of Capt. John.

Judge Glenn Howard Worthington (1858-1934) was the son of John Thomas Worthington who wrote the book “The Battle that Saved Washington”.  It should be noted, that Judge Worthington was involved in creating this National Battlefield before his death in 1934.

The re-enactor’s for the day, were “in uniform”, as they may have been 148 years ago, and had a number of demonstrations to give a hint as to what the battle might have looked like.

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The story teller, gave us a hint into the life of the Confederate Army at the time of this battle.

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The above photography was demonstrating a Skirmish Line, as an advanced party ahead of the Confederate Army that was behind them.

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The Union story teller, walked us through “by the 9 count”, and what that was so important.

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The Union Army was demonstrating “by the 9 count” way of firing. Oh, did you know that 4 teeth and 2 fingers were required to be in the Army? We learned why.

The National Park Service provided information about the importance of this battle. This was the only battle that the Confederate Army won on Union Soil?

The Confederate Army was going to take Washington, DC. The Union Army was “out of place”, and were trying to get re-enforcements back to DC to fortify the city.

The Union Army was able to slow down the Confederate Army for “a day”, allowing those re-enforcements to get back into place.

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The heat of the day, watching the demonstration, helped put this battle into perspective, from the stories of this battle, at this place, 148 years ago.


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