Blog Query: Issac Worthington

September 13, 2011

Jimmy Worthington says:

March 2, 2011 at 10:32 pm (Edit)

My Great-Grandfather left Oklahoma and settled in Lindale, Texas. His name was Issac Worthington, I believe. He was a peace officer of some kind in Oklahoma. Peace was in short supply those days in Oklahoma. He ended up killing a member of some gang. He knew if he stayed, the rest would kill him. That is when he moved to Texas. His Dad had moved to Oklahoma, from Tennessee. I am not sure, but I have heard that he was in the “Oklahoma land run”. His brother moved to California. When my Grandfather, William Shelby Worthington was getting on in years, a man & his wife drove up to their house, and told him that he was his cousin from California. He did not even know that his Dad had any siblings. Because of this, I have met a few of that branch of the family.

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Fearless Females Blog Post: March 8 – Favorite Female Ancestor – Prompts for Women’s History Month

March 8, 2010

I want to point out a series of daily blogging prompts entitled Fearless Females created by Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog in honor of Women’s History Month which starts today, 1 March 2010.

* March 8 — Did one of your female ancestors leave a diary, journal, or collection of letters? Share an entry or excerpt.

Actually I have two.

Ann C. Whitall, the Heroine of Read Bank, the Battle of Gloucester

and

From Tennessee to California in 1849. Letters of the Reeve Family of Medford, New Jersey.

In light of the most recent “Who Do You Think You Are” episode, with Sarah Jessica Parker, and her Gold Rush Story, I’ll put a short quote from one of these letters.

Sacrament City, California
December 30th 1849

(Letter written by Rebecca Reeve and addressed to her cousin, Mary W. Ely, Medford Burlington County, New Jersey.

<snip>

Dear Cousin

With what feeling of happiness could I adress a letter to thee now, my first from this pleasant City, this City grown up as if by magic, this the end of our long and tedious journey. This our resting place and I expect future home, . If we could number three, but Ah my Cousin, brother R and myself only lived to reach the end of our journey. I have to nerve myself to look back and relate to thee the horrible death of our dear brother Clayton. I wish the task were not mine. I seem to almost feel the terrible arrows of the savage Indians pierceing me as they pierced our deat brother. He was indeed killed by them, killed by some of the most fierce and Savage tribe in North America. The Clamath Indians, of Clamath lake, Oregon. over at their hunting and fishing grounds upon Pit river, upper Californina, where the emigration passed.

<end snip>

These letters were published in The Journal of the Rutgers University Library, Volune XI, Number 2, June 1948.


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