Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Connections

October 2, 2011

I must say, that I haven’t posted all of my findings on this project. I am really trying to stay focused on the Methodology that Dr. Jones has presented. Going through all of the pictures from yesterday, I thought that I would show one of my findings.

Driving around Baltimore, “in search of …. “ the Howards, I saw a new monument about a block from one of the houses that I found.

This house is 901 St Paul Street. McHenry Howard and household in the 1920 Census. Up the street, within the block was another residence of this household in previous census records. There is a historical marker, which I couldn’t get close enough to, said that this was the home of Samuel Shoemaker (another mystery). But, there it is. St. Paul Street carries the name of an Episcopal Church not to far away.

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Behind me, as I took this picture a block or two was a statue of John Eager Howard (1752-1827). Within a block or two was Eager Street.  Like many folks I have run across in this project, he has a story.

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Here is a picture of the Statue.

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Speaking of Episcopal Churches:

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I could not get a good enough position to take a picture of the church itself, but I will visit one day when I can get it. Mentioned in a previous Blog post, Worthington’s were at this church, moved out to St. Thomas Garrison Forrest, then to Worthington Valley. But, I digress.

Back to John Eager Howard.

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If you read this sign: this lot was proved by Col. John Eager Howard.

Why all of the interest in this little side trip, away from David Ridgely Howard? I peeked at my own database and guess who I found. John Eager Howard. His wife is my 3rd Cousin, 6 times removed. That linkage, may hold the clue to David Ridgely Howard.

I have often heard, “look sideways”. This to me is one of those glances sideways. I have David Ridgeley Howards’ names, but can’t get the previous generation.

It is obvious to me, that the folks that I have found, for this project, were known and had an impact on Baltimore. Many of the surnames I have mentioned thus far are street names within blocks of where these pictures were taken.

Lesson Learned: Had I only known what I would be doing when I retired, I would have “walked the streets” when I worked in Baltimore. These places are all within walking distance of my job.


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Names

October 2, 2011

After taking a quick glance of about 200 photos from yesterday, I am almost confused.

It’s all about names, right?

This project started when I watched the PBS series Gettysburg. I heard the name Ridgely Howard. In my research in my own family both of these names are surnames. As I started the research Ridgely was his middle name.

No problem, been there, done that. I go by my middle name. Simple reason, I am a “III” (3rd), and there were three generations living on a small family farm. My grandfather went by his middle name, the Surname of a Grandfather, my Dad by his first name, and I was called the same way my grandfather was. This worked and still works, although my Dad has passed away. To clear the confusion about who you were talking to. Grandfather, Father, on me.

So, we now have David Ridgely Howard. (there’s a twist, a common first name for a Surname). “My” Howards were in Virginia, soon there after into Maryland. So, Howard, to me, as a Surname is OK. Got that.

Looking at Census Records, for the Howards, McHenry as a Middle name was appearing, and a First Name. Good thing I didn’t jump to any conclusions here. Could that Census Record have recorded McHenry, like Ridgely as the first name?

The biggest problem at this point is the names of member of the Households. For example, McHenry Howard and James McHenry Howard households had similar members of the household, living in close proximity of each other. At this point, it’s pretty clear that they are not the same family (yet).

The cemetery visits may have also separated the families (house holds) as well. Two different cemeteries, different parts of town. BUT, it may be a common Church. Working on that.

So, I looked at my pictures from the 3rd cemetery and I run into the same issue. My brain had told me that I had taken pictures of Howard headstones and McHenry headstones. Both of which were true and I clearly remembers one of the Howard children as Julianna Howard. So I took a bunch of pictures of the plot (10 – 15 stones).

Her stone was Julianna Howard McHenry, whose father was James Howard McHenry. The dates for Julianna were not right.

I have been putting off looking at the history of Fort McHenry, also in Baltimore.

A couple of years ago, while visiting my brother-in-law in a Veterans Hospital in Baltimore, we went to a historic cemetery that was next to where I had parked the car. In my search for the 1st cemetery, where “Betty Lou” was giving me a fit, you know “recalculating”, I saw an old cemetery, then realized it was the same one we had visited a couple of years earlier.

My car has a bumper sticker “I stop at cemeteries”, so I did. Went in where Edgar Allen Poe is buried, but so is James McHenry, of Fort McHenry fame.

So how does James McHenry Howard, James Howard McHenry, McHenry Howard related to David Ridgely Howard?

What did I learn from this: Where did THAT Name come from? Naming patterns ….


Inferential Genealogy Study Group in 2nd Life–Cemetery Visit

October 2, 2011

Some of you may know that I contribute to and use the Find-A-Grave website for useful information. I have contributed several hundred pictures, have given a number of talks on the subject. Oh, and I use it for research. Some times you can get relationships in some of the information associated with a memorial. I have been doing that for this project.

However, I have not been able to find David Ridgely Howard, a Civil War Veteran on Find-A-Grave. I found that quite interesting, considering all of the Civil War headstone pictures I have taken, especially around Memorial Day and Veterans Day. He just wasn’t there.

I decided I needed to take a short, day trip to Baltimore. The purpose of the trip was to actually see some of the places that the Census Records had shown me, and to visit one cemetery.

Now, I worked in Baltimore for 2 years, so I had some idea where some of these places were (are). They were only blocks from where I worked. How difficult can this trip be.

So I made the trip, spent an hour or so on the USCGC Eagle, (USCG Barque Eagle, America’s Tall Ship), then found a couple of the addresses that were in the Census Records. The relationships between the addresses, Church, and Cemetery all made sense to me. Street Names, a Monument were all in line with what I had mapped out in my mind. Thanks to GPS, (more of the time) the trip was easy.

The first cemetery was chained and locked, with no parking in the area to stop more then a minute to take a picture of the lock and chain. Went by the Church that was associated with the Cemetery and then a light bulb went off. I have been to this church before. A line from Capt. John Worthington was a member at that church. A Duh moment.

Re-programmed “Betty Lou” to take me to Green Mount Cemetery, to see if I could find David Ridgely Howard there. His Civil War records said he was, but not listed on Find-A-Grave. I have paperwork to send for information, but since I was there, why not look around.

The Cemetery was not far away, 10 minutes or so, and the gate was half open, but a caretaker was there who let me in. 45 minutes until closing. Nice gentlemen, but he didn’t have access to any information. So, a ride around the cemetery to get a overview of who I might find there. There were a number of family Surnames that I know from the Baltimore / Annapolis area were resting there. Will have to review my pictures to see if any of them were in my files. But, where is Pvt. Howard.

The rain was starting, the time was running out, but there was one road I hadn’t tried. At the top of the hill was a large, flat HOWARD stone. The Howard I knew there was Benjamin Chew Howard. Of course my Droid Find-A-Grave AP helped, and since is was ‘famous’ in the area, certainly I could find him. But, again, Find-A-Grave didn’t have a picture, only a Memorial. Could this large, flat, stone hold the remains of this family? It might be the reason why the others aren’t listed on Find-A-Grave. I’ll be on the phone on Monday to see if this theory doesn’t pan out. I can then order more detailed information that they have on their website.

Not done for the day yet, Since I am now pretty sure that I was dealing with Two Families, and have a pretty good idea who belongs to whom, though sharing some comment names, I needed to go to a third cemetery.

DearMYRTLE and I have some common ancestors that the next cemetery. my wife and I have visited this church and cemetery before, but hadn’t made this Howard Connection here. I had only made a Worthington connection. It’s the same connection with the Church in Baltimore.

There, was a pretty good sized plot of the 2nd Howard family, are at least some of them.

Lots of pictures to review, post on Find-A-Grave and take the information from them an put them into my database.

Learning from this: Some times a physical visit to a place my help with new clues in resolving a brick wall. Do I have David Ridgely Howard’s grandparents yet? No! Am I still missing a puzzle piece? Yes! But, I DO know, my next steps.


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