1940 Census–2 Found, 1 Missing, 1 Miss Named

April 2, 2012

I actually found my mother twice, which was interesting. I went to where her parents had been living, and I thought they would still be there. But I didn’t know when my grandparents moved “in to town”.

My grandfather was listed, but his wife’s name was listed as my mother, but with her mothers age.

What was very interesting is the my Aunt was NOT listed at all.

Strode_House-1929

House in 1929

Now, that’s not a small house, and about where this picture was taken is a Barn (Baldwin Book Barn). At least once census record had a maid living in the house.

An excuse to check in with my aunt, I called and asked where she was in 1940, and as expected, “in junior high school”. Not listed anywhere.

I found my parents, and confirmed by my aunt, that they were living in an apartment “in town”. I am guessing that they were living there, while my dad was building his house.

Note to self: get the house building Photo’s digitized

Lesson Learned: The few extra steps in preparing for this day, has paid off.

I have probably been through 100+ Census Images, and of course the ones I wanted were at the end of the Enumeration District. But “we’re good to go” for some more looking at images.


First of my 1940 Census findings

April 2, 2012

House_Worthington-FarmHouse-1952

Farm House in 1952

OK. The wait has been worth it, almost. I found my Grandparents and their children, on the farm. Haven’t found my parents, but they can’t be too far away, as they lived on the same farm, but there was a road running through the farm.

House_Worthington_Henry-2010

The house that Dad Built (taken in 2010)

What I found most interesting was the next entry. Long story short. Those of us who grew up on the farm, as children, had a “best friend” who lived with his mother across the road. (what is a historical home in Chester County). His mother was the housekeeper for two “lady Doctors”. The Census Entry, confirmed a live long belief, but never thought it would have listed as “Head” and “Partner”.

Off to find my parents.


Ancestry.com’s 1940 Status (04/02/12–1:45pm)

April 2, 2012
State    Image Status 
American Samoa  Complete 
California In Process
Delaware Complete 
District of Columbia  Complete 
Guam Complete 
Indiana Complete 
Maine Complete 
Nevada Complete 
New York In Process
Panama Canal Zone  Complete 
Pennsylvania In Process
Rhode Island Complete 
Virgin Islands Complete 
Virginia In Process

 

Guess I should take a name. New York (1 household) is still “in progress”, but my pick list just started and is “in progress”, Pennsylvania.

Can’t even get the Indexing to download a (non-1940 census record) so that I could index a couple of New Jersey WWI records.


Ancestry.com’s 1940 Status (04/02/12–12:30pm

April 2, 2012

 

State    Image Status 
American Samoa  Complete 
Delaware Complete 
District of Columbia  Complete 
Guam Complete 
Indiana Complete 
Maine Complete 
Nevada Complete 
New York In Process
Panama Canal Zone  Complete 
Rhode Island Complete 
Virgin Islands Complete 

Ancestry.com’s 1940 Status (04/02/12–11:00am

April 2, 2012
State    Image Status 
District of Columbia  Complete 
Guam In Process
Indiana In Process
Maine In Process
Nevada Complete 
New York In Process

In Search of … The 1940 Census Records

April 2, 2012

1940CountDown

I learned early this morning, before the coffee had completely finished brewing, that Ancestry.com had loaded some 1940 Census Records.

My Preparation work had paid off. When I went to get some shut-eye a few hours earlier, I had printed my 9 page Who to Search for, and Where, and it was sitting on the keyboard when went to Ancestry.com. Here I thought I would have a couple of hours before the images were there. So, I am glad I had that print out ready to go.

Ancestry.com had Virgin Islands, Rhode Island, Panama Canal, Nevada, Maine, Indiana, Guam, District of Columbia, Delaware, and American Samoa.

I remembered that I had a family in the 1930 Census at Fort Amador, Balboa District, Panama Canal Zone. I don’t know much about this family, so really didn’t know IF I would find anything about them. 60 pages of images later, nothing. Not a big deal.

I know that a cousin, David Reed, lived in DC and that there is a Worthington house in Georgetown. So, to the District of Columbia records I went.

Could not find the street address in the Enumeration District where the house is located. Found surrounding streets, but not this one. Will look for that house later. Just trying to see who lived in it in 1940.

Some of you may remember David Reed. He and I went back and forth on a Worthington Email list for a number of years. Some of the Worthington researchers may remember a gathering at the Monocacy Battle Ground, in Frederick, where the Worthington House Trail was open and David was the guest speaker. It was his Grandfather, Judge Glenn Howard Worthington who wrote a book about his Civil War Experience.

I had David’s address before he passed away, so I looked to see if he was in that house in the 1940 Census. Found the house, saw it on Google Earth, but another family was living there at the time.

Don’t have others in the loaded 1940 Census Records yet, so I did a batch of Indexing, just to get back in the hang of that, while I wait.

The 1940 Census Records, as of this moment, are not available for us to index.

My 9 page report is almost complete with the 1930 Locations, addresses and ED listing, and hand written 1940 ED listings are almost done. Back to Steve Morse’s website to identify the rest.


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