The continued search for the Stair Case

September 16, 2011

In this Blog post: http://worthy2be.wordpress.com/2011/02/03/in-search-of-montmorenci/ I continue my search for these two staircases. Earlier, I mentioned that the 2nd staircase was located at the Winterthur Museum in Delaware. I joined there, with my daughter, so we could visit this wonderful museum and learn more about it and the staircase Its a wonderful place to visit.

Recently, they started a blog:

http://museumblog.winterthur.org/

So, I posted this question:

To the Staff:

Wonderful new Blog. Thank you.

I hope it’s OK to ask here.

In the museum, you have the Montmorenci Staircase. That staircase, as I understand it, came from South Carolina from a house called Montmorenci. I have seen photos of that house and have seen a couple of brief stories.

However, not an hour south of Winterthur is another Montmorenci which also has a Montmorenci Stair case.

So, my question is, how come there are Two Montmorenci’s and both of those houses have similar staircases.

My guess is, that the answer lies within architectural information about one or both of the houses. Did the architect or Mr duPont know of the Maryland Montmorenci.

I have posted some information on the Maryland Montmorenci here:

http://worthy2be.wordpress.com/tag/montmorenci/

Thank you for your time an consideration and I look forward to your new Blog posts. With any luck, I’ll get back down to Winterthur this fall.

Thank you,

Russ

I did get an answer. Perhaps not the answer I wanted, but here it is.

Russ, I checked with our estate historian, and here’s what she says: The answer has to do with a coincidence of name. A French aristocrat named Montmorency commanded troops under Rochambeau in the American Revolution and became an American hero. There are many towns and houses named after him. The staircase in Maryland is curved like the one from the house named Montmorenci, which was located near Shocco Springs, North Carolina, but is not free-standing. The free-standing curve is what interested du Pont. Hope this helps!

So, for now, I will put my research aside for a while, as there may not have been a connection in the first place. The time for the naming of the property may be the connection, but what about the stairs. I need to make another visit to Maryland to get a better look at the staircase and to see if I can find “the rest of that story”.

So, for now, back to my Civil War Hero.


The Face of Genealogy

June 5, 2011

This is in response to a number of Genea-Bloggers who have seen and read an article in the LA Times.

To Quote from http://www.geneabloggers.com/face-genealogy/

In a recent event article at the LAWeekly website, the above photo was used in a brief article about the upcoming Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree being held in Burbank, California from June 10-12, 2011.

I won’t post the was included in the article, as it certainly does not represent the Images in my Family. I will post one here:

Grandparents 50th Wedding Anniversary


Blog Reader to Blog to Flickr to Headstone Photos

April 14, 2011

Just a short note of Thanks to Blogger Gale Wall of the Digital Cemetery Walk Blog.

While reading my daily Blog Reader messages, I came to a recent Blog post by Gale. I have been following this blog for a while, as I also have interests in Cemeteries. The posting was about updating her Flickr page(s) and how to utilize what she has posted on Flickr. I have been working on doing the same thing.

When I looked, what caught my eye was the Kansas Cemeteries. Looked down and saw Lyons County, where my ancestors lived. The cemetery was Cottonwood, also a name that was familiar to me. Scrolling though the 60 some odd photos was my 2nd Great Grandfather’s (Job Whitall Reeve) stone and a couple of his children.

A couple of clues for me, 1) confirmation of where they were buried, 2) the stone flat on the ground would confirm to me their Quaker Heritage, and 3) a couple of dates were confirmed.

A special Thank You to Gale for sharing her photographs Online, so “we” can find them.


New Record Group

March 28, 2011

While attending an Online Chat in “Second Life”, we were talking about Land Patents. This is a Record Group that I had not looked into before.

Knowing that my Great Grandfather, Samuel Worthington (1843 – 1897) and his wife, Sarah Catherine Reeve (1849 – 1894) moved to Kansas, where my grandfather was born (27 July 1887), I decided to see what I could find. So, off to this website:

http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/

There were four listings for the children of Samuel and Sarah.

(Mary) Elizabeth Traver Worthington (1886 – 1941), who married Willits Reeve Worthington (1872 – 1942), Henry W(Wilson) Worthington (Jr) 1853 – 1938), and J (Josiah) Wistar Worthington (1888 – 1953).

Land Patent Number 291284

Land Patent Number 291284

This Land Patent was issued 12 day of September, 1912 and signed by President Wm. H. Taft.

“Whereas, a Certificate of the Register of the Land Office at Dodge City, Kansas, has been deposited in the General Land Office, whereby it appears that full payment has been made by the claimant J. Wistar Worthington according in the provisions of the Act of Congress of April 24, 1820, entitled “As Act making further provision for the sale of the Public Lands.” and the acts supplemental thereto, for the Southwest quarter of section twenty-two in township thirty-two south of range forty-three west of the sixth principal meridian, Kansas, containing one hundred sixty acres.”

The Mapping feature on the website did not appear to be working, so that I could see how the other two Land Patients were located. Henry Wilson Worthington, Jr, and Mark Willits Worthington’s Land Patients were in Morton County and appear to be very close.

Elizabeth Traver Worthington was in Stevens county.

Now to learn was the other information on these documents mean.


In Search of …. Don’t forget the Newspaper

February 23, 2011

I have posted a couple of times that I am searching for information about Montmorenci (Maryland) and it’s staircase. During this process, I received a comment, from the Blog, from someone who I has lost contact with. During our “conversation” I was told about an event that took place at Montmorenci.

I did some searching, but didn’t get anywhere. However, I had signed up for a Webinar that was being provided by Legacy Family Tree. The webinar’s title was:

Newspapers: Critical Resource to Complete Your Family Tree The speaker was Thomas Jay Kemp.

More about this webinar can be found on this website:

Legacy Family Tree

Looking at the menu at the top, is Training, and Webinars. I haven’t put the link directly to the Webinar, as the recording of that Webinar will not be available after March 10, 2011. But the Legacy Family Tree Webinars have been very educational.

The topic was on how to take advantage of the GenealogyBank website. Thomas said a couple of times, “don’t forget the newspapers“. (or at least that is what I heard).

That was on February 2, 2011. Just a couple of days earlier, I had received the email, mentioned earlier. In that email was:

“I was also told that a husband was murdered by his wife in .. house. I’ve always wanted to research that story!”

Thomas’ comment and that email stayed with me until the end of the Webinar. Didn’t want to miss any of his words of wisdom.

Webinar over, headed over to Genealogy Bank, and look at their Historical Documents collection. Having listened about how to search, I wanted the best results, quickly. Had to find that article.

What I knew was that the murder happened at Montmorenci. Of course, Worthington’s built that house and it was in the family until the early 1900’s. BUT, I didn’t want to guess that it was a Worthington. Didn’t know the name, nor date of the Murder. But, I did know that Montmorenci was in Maryland, and that it was in Baltimore County. So, I selected Maryland, and Baltimore County.

Didn’t want to enter anything BUT Montmorenci in the Include in keyword search. There were a couple of pages of “hits”. I looked at the articles which confirmed some of the information that I knew about the house, property, and people who lived in that house.

The 10th Hit was:

Shot Dead by His Wife: Sad Fate of Mr. L. L. Conrad
1883-08-08
Sun Newspaper (Baltimore)

Bingo.

What a story it was (is). There is a lot of genealogical information in that 1883 newspaper article. Some confirming what I knew, but the level of detail of the event were outstanding. I won’t go into the details about that, but what a story.

But, there is more work to do. As the opening line said:

Lawrence Lewis Conrad, a great-great nephew of George Washington …” got my attention. His wife was “Miss Minnie Worthington”. So, another branch to follow.

Of course, I passed this information along to the person I was emailing.

But, the story doesn’t end there.

I attend a “local” Family History Interest Group (FHIG), in Bernards Township, NJ at the local library. I have been known to speak there, but it’s an hour away so I don’t always get there. The topic last night was on how to use America’s Genealogy Bank. The Reference Supervisor, Ruth Lufkin was the speaker. She gave a great presentation on the America’s Genealogy Bank, as the library uses it’s resources. She showed us (about 40 of us) how to use it, with tricks on how to use the search, what you might find.

I had mentioned to Ruth, when I got there, that I had a story about my experience with Genealogy Bank. She said that she had been looking for some connection between Genealogy Bank and FHIG.

As the say, “and the rest is history”.

The bottom line here are two fold:

1) Don’t forget your Library

2) Don’t forget the Newspaper

Thank you Ruth, for letting me share my story.


Worthington, David Greeneoow (1821 – 1893)

December 15, 2010

I am posting a comment, on the About Me page, so that it appears as a Query:

My ggf was David Greenwood Worthington born 1821 in Mississippi . He showed up in Washington County,Florida about 1845 on the first Florida voters list and lived there till his death in 1893 . He married and raised a large family before his death. I have not found any parents for him, I did find one brother Martin M. Worthington born in 1819 also in Mississippi.

If anyone has any information on this line please help.

This was from Wanda;

Website: http://ggfworthington/

Email: wank7@hughes.net

Or, please post a comment here.

Thank you,


Montmorenci – Colonial Mansions of Maryland and Delaware

November 16, 2010

From: Colonial Mansions of Maryland and Delaware
by John Martin Hammond

BALTIMORE COUNTY. MARYLAND
WORTHINGTON — CONRAD — LEHR

NEAR the hamlet of Glyndon, Baltimore County, Maryland, in the Worthington Valley, is to be found the old Worthington homestead, Montmorenci, built about 1760 by Samuel Worthington who married Mary Tolley. From these two a long line with many branches has descended, and from this generous old home have gone forth many sturdy sons who have played conspicuous parts among their fellows. The house is finely situated on the crest of a hill in the centre of the thousand and more acres which remain to it of the vast tracts over which it lorded when it was young, and is as sound and weatherproof to-day as when it was new.

It is of stone and plaster construction, the walls being very thick and the foundations of a mass sufficient to support a battlemented tower. A winding road leads from the entrance of the grounds to the front of the house, and from the rear the ground falls sharply away to the Italian garden which the present mistress of the old home, Mrs. Mary Conrad Lehr, of Montmorenci and Washington, is devising at the foot of this declivity. The exterior of the house is plain, and there is a small wing at the north end which contains the kitchen and pantries.

The interior arrangement of Montmorenci is like that of many another old Maryland home in that it has a broad hallway from front to back of the house, on which as an axis the other rooms are symmetrically disposed. The winding staircase, however, with its slender mahogany rail and its slim, patrician mahogany spokes, is a very graceful and unusual feature and is perhaps one of the mansion’s greatest beauties.

In Montmorenci may be found a great quantity of rare old furniture which (as is not always the case) has found an appreciative mistress in the daughter of the house of this generation. It would be, perhaps, without interest to mention styles and periods well known or to attempt in any way a description of the furniture, but in each room of the house are to be found pieces to interest the lover of things colonial, and so great a quantity has Mrs. Lehr that she is able to furnish her new home in Washington from Montmorenci without seeming to have robbed that place.

Not far from Montmorenci is Bloomfield, another old Worthington place and built by a son of the builder of Montmorenci. It is a brick homestead and is distinguished for the carving which graces the north wall of the living room on the interior. Though long a Worthington possession, it has been for a number of years the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Councilmann.

The Worthington family has already received a brief summary in the chapter devoted to Belvoir, the beautiful mansion on the Severn in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. The tombstone of the founder of the family in Maryland, Capt. John Worthington, is to be found in a vacant field not far from Annapolis and still in good preservation. From it we learn that Captain John died in 1701. His son, John, styled “Merchant” in his will (in which he disposes of a great fortune), married Helen Hammond, daughter of Thomas Hammond and his wife, Mary Heath, and had, among other children, Samuel Worthington, who married Mary Tolley, daughter of Walter Tolley, of Joppa, Baltimore County, Maryland, and built Montmorenci.

From Samuel Worthington the homestead descended through Edward, his son, to John Tolley Worthington, first, to John Tolley Worthington, second, his greatgrandson, who married Mary Govane Hood, daughter of James Hood, of Hood’s Mill, Baltimore County, Maryland. From him it descended to his daughter, Mrs. Sarah Worthington Conrad, now an invalid, whose daughter (who married Louis C. Lehr, Esq.) is the present mistress of Montmorenci.

Colonial Mansions of Maryland and Delaware
by John Martin Hammond
WITH SIXTY-FIVE ILLUSTRATIONS
Philadelphia & London
J. B. Lippincott Company
1914
School of Architecture
Harvard University
Copyright, 1914, by J.B. Lippincott Company
Published September, 1914
Printed by J. B. Lippincott Company
at the Washington Square Press
Philadelphia, U.S.A.


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