Video of the Civil War

March 22, 2014

Facebook strikes again.

I had an invite to Friend someone on Facebook. I didn’t know the name, but one of the surnames I knew, Worthington. The location was Mt Airy, Maryland. I know that place and already have a Facebook friend there.

Of course, I friended. What I saw was awesome, a link to a Video

Heart of the Civil War

Last summer I visited Frederick, Maryland for the celebration of Special Order 191. While watching this video, those orders were shown as well as one of the speakers in the video. I had met on that visit.

What was interesting about this visit and the video was my question about why Fredrick was “Union Friendly” while Baltimore, a mere 30-40 miles east was “not so much”. The video helped clarify that issue, including why Maryland was a “border state” and didn’t decide which side they were on.

This past fall, I had the chance to visit Monocacy with another cousin, DearMYRTLE. I didn’t take any pictures on my camera on that visit. My bad.

A book was written by Judge Glenn Howard Worthington that told the story of the battle that took place on his “front lawn”.

WorthingtonHouse-Basement-01

Judge Glenn Howard Worthington’s grandson, David Reed and a National Park Service Ranger are in the place where the Judge watched that battle.

WorthingtonHouse-1999-01

The front of the house in 1999 when a gathering of Worthington’s supported David Reed as he opened the Worthington Walking Trail in the National Battlefield.

Another visit, but with a little snow on the ground, but the porch had been reattached.

WorthingtonHouse-1900

ca 1900

About 42 minutes  into the video, was the story of the Battle at Monocacy, the battle that “Saved Washington”. The video tells the story of Glenn Worthington. I have seen that basement. In fact the picture I have above, is that same place.

So cool to watch the story that has your “family” mentioned.

Oh, the new Facebook Friend, is a relative of Judge Glenn Howard Worthington as well.

Social Media at work (again). Thank you Paula


A Note from Facebook–22 May 2013

November 17, 2013

Patrick Lee Worthington

Dear Mr. Worthington:

I follow your blog and have enjoyed reading your posts on the various genealogy sites over the years. I descend from what the late David Reed referred to as the “Squirrel Hunting” Worthington’s. My direct ancestors are James Worthington (1781-1862) and Nancy McGraw (1781-1857). There is circumstantial evidence that we descend from Robert Worthington, the Quaker Immigrant, but, in my opinion, little else. Would it be OK to send you a friend request? Or do you prefer I join/follow a specific group on Facebook?

Mainly, just wanted to introduce myself and thank you for all the work you’ve done helping ALL branches of the Worthington’s with their research.

Sincerely,
Patrick Worthington,
Lexington, KY

Posted 22 May 2013 – just thought I would share that message here.


Query: Samuel Wortington, Texas

November 5, 2013

A question from a reader of this blog:

drenshaw1@hotmail.com
Comment Is this Worthington bunch any relationship to the Samuel Worthington that was killed in Texas in the early 1830′s?

drenshaw1,

Which “Worthington bunch” are you speaking of?

I know and have researched at least 4 Worthington lines in the USA starting about 1650. This Blog is not about any one of them, I am a descendant of one of the 4.

Please provide some additional information so that we can help you.

If you are a reader of this blog and know of a Samuel Worthington who was killed in Texas in the early 1830′a, please post a reply to drenshaw1.

Thank you,

Russ


News at 11: Just found out that my “brick wall” may now be a ” black sheep”

October 10, 2013

Don’t you like the Questions and Answer sessions where someone asks a question and the person responding says

So.. blah, blah, blah. Drives me crazy.

So, I get this email response to a question about the Worthington Family History Society DNA Project. Of the group who were tested, 36, I was in a group of 4. The four of use all are in the US, and close to our common ancestors home. In fact, one lives in the SAME TOWN as our 6th Great Grandfather.

Not long ago, I made this Blog Post: New Thoughts on “Brick Walls”. I still think that is true. When I started to do my Family Research I kept running into information that just didn’t look right. When I tried to “cross the pond” there was conflicting information, names and dates that didn’t make any sense. So, I stopped.

Not that long also, I posted a message for a trial “peer review” and one comment was that you don’t have Negative Evidence but Negative Findings. Thank you Elizabeth Shown Mills of EvidenceExplained.com fame and author of a book by the same name.

Also, I learned a lot while we did the Mastering Genealogical Proof a book by Dr. Thomas W Jones where we learned how to work with the Genealogical Proof Standard. I have blogged about that, and won’t talk about it here now.

I changed my thought process about the term BRICK WALL.

I had stopped for 10+ years about trying to find Who were the Parents of Capt John Worthington (1650 – 1701).

At least i have a specific Question to answer. Didn’t even know about that until a couple of months ago, thanks to Dr Jones. I followed a Shaky Leaf and actually saw a Baptismal Record from the early 1600′s in the right location. Wow, I can start to look for Capt John. But life got in the way. I have been working with a lot of data from the Worthington Family History Society 17th Century Project where a team of Worthington researchers at look at gathering, verifying information and creating 17th Century Pedigree Views.

I am still not making a connection. One of my US based cousins put together a very credible view of the ancestry of Capt John. Resolved conflicting information after putting his research together, lots of great documentation. However, some of his conclusions were part of what I had looked at a very long time ago. I wasn’t uncomfortable with what his conclusion was as there was nothing to argue about. Totally credible information.

Every once in a while, I would check the FamilyTreeDNA project status. No change: Y-DNA Haplagroup numbers:

  • Haplagroup E – 2 people
  • Haplagroup G – 1 person
  • Haplagroup I – 13 people
  • Haplagroup R1b1b2 – 16 people
  • Haplagroup J2 – 4

J2 is what my results are. All 4 are in the vicinity of Maryland.

So, I sent an email to the Worthington Family History Society for a Status Update on the Larger Project hoping the someone from the United Kingdom had been or will be tested. Hoping someone from across the pond would be  a J2. No such luck.

Just as I was loading the car for a 3 hour drive to Baltimore, I did a quick, final check of my Email. A RE: (reply) to my email question. OK, here comes the answer, gotta read it.

As I read it, I see:

 If a distant relative cannot be found to confirm this there are two possibilities: one, that your line is from a founding family in the 14th century and we have not discovered a matching line or two, that you should match another known W(orthington) line but that there has been “Non Paternal Event” (illegitimacy, adoption etc) sometime before Capt John resulting in a different Haplagroup.

So, my “brick wall” may have become a Black Sheep. OK, that sort of backs up my earlier concern about the relationships that I had seen early on; the stuff that didn’t quite make sense to me.

Elizabeth Shown Mills was right, I haven’t looked in the right place. But thinking about what Dr Jones brought up, maybe I haven’t asked the Right Question.

Driving down all of the information that I could remember was running through my mind. What did I miss? What do I want to go back to look at again. I thought about the term FAN Club (Family, Acquaintance, and Neighbors). (Wish I could note who presented us with that term). I have followed some of the FAN Club, but who did I not look at close enough?

I am going to re-look at the FAN club and change my research Question. I have a couple of thoughts on both. I have had a couple of Why questions that have been around from the beginning.

It would appear that today’s DNA Technology may disprove a number of conclusions that I have seen all over, if these DNA results are right.

Off to go chase a Sheep


One Brick Wall is now dust

May 30, 2013

Well OK, it’s down, but it’s still a bit dusty. I have a little clean up work to do.

Earlier this year, I was in Salt Lake City and had a chance to visit the Family History Library. I had not planned the visit, wasn’t really going to spend too much time researching, but since some other GeneaBloggers were there, I went over too.

I posted a Blog: Who is Capt John Worthingtons Father

I had hints from that trip, have talked about how I am using Evidentia to work on this brick wall: Initial Proof Report:

Today, I received a long awaited letter with source material that was behind the Pedigree Charts that I talked about in the Evidentia series. I had seen a code ITEM PR2 listed several times in the various documents I have seen over the years, but didn’t have a cross reference to what that was. Actually, I did have it in my archives, in about 500 pages of reference material.

In the Item PR2 (Parish Record #2) was this bit of information.

References  “English Parish Records: Lancashire (Salford & West Derby Hundreds), Cheshire, Flintshire” – CD produced by Ancestry.com “from parish records and similar sources” for all 1600-1615 details, “The Registers of the Cathedral Church of Manchester, 1573-1653”, Lancashire Parish Register Society (LPRS), Volume 31, for all 1616-1653 details and “International Genealogical Index” (IGI), Batches P005461 and C005462 (Baptisms 1654-1699) and Batch M005462 (Marriages 1665-1699).

CD produced by whom? I have seen that before, in fact, had blogged about it. Day One–Searching in Lancashire, England

It wasn’t the same location in England, but I wondered IF the information in Item PR2 was also online. Well it was. Here is the parish register entry for Francis Worthington and Sarah Byrom(e)’s wedding.

 

Worthington-Francis_Byrom-Sarah

Not stopping here, because in the notes for “Item PR2” was this.

Reference 17C, Vol 2, Item PR2: Notes by Stuart G Worthington (1) This entry is misleading and incorrect! The marriage of “Franches Worthington et Sara Byrom” actually took place at St. Mary the Virgin’s Church, Prestwich, on 15 September 1646, as shown in such church’s Marriage Register – see ITEM PR32. No doubt, the marriage was “recorded’ in Manchester, because Francis, like his parents, lived there: in ‘recording’ this union, the name Sarah Browne was was erroneously entered in the Collegiate Church’s Marriage Register instead of Sarah Byrom. This error accounts for several American websites stating that Francis married Sarah Browne. 1

This is going to be interesting. But clearly, the author of this article, Stuart G Worthington, had done his homework and has shared that with other Worthington researchers. Can’t wait to get this new information into Evidentia.

But, I still had an issue. Collegiate Church, Manchester, Lancashire, England, and the name of the church in the Ancestry.com website of St Mary, St Denys and St George, Manchester, Lancashire, England. So, I did a google search for St Mary, St Denys and St George and found this website.

http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Manchester/Cathedral.shtml

Oh, the PR2 had about 75 Worthington Baptisms between 1600 and 1699, similar number of Marriages between 1600 and 1699 (excluding 1654-1664) and Burials between 1600 and 1653). Almost 4 pages of typed names. No wonder I couldn’t determine who Capt John’s parents were. 4 pages of Worthington’s had an event that took place in the 17th century.

In the Frederick Adams Virkus, Immigrant Ancestors2, it mentioned a brother, Samuel Worthington, that arrived with Capt John to Maryland. I have not found him or anyone close to him in the records. Still looking for that one.

 

1 Stuart G Worthington, “Register of Worthington References:  17 Century – Volume 2″, Collegiate Church, Manchester, Lancashire PR2 (31 July 2007):  p 39 – 43, English Parish Records; Lancashire (Salford & West Derby Hundreds), Cheshire, Flintshire. 15 Sep 1646 Francis Worthington / Sarah Browne (1)

2Frederick Adams Virkus, Immigrant Ancestors:  A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America before 1750  (1942; Reprinted, Baltimore:  Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1976); Page 75; Worthington, Capt. John; Family History Library, 35 North West Temple Street
Salt Lake City, Utah.


Marriage Record for George Worthington and Elizabeth Sandiford 11 Jun 1663

April 15, 2013

From a hint, on Ancestry.com, I found a marriage record for George Worthington and Elizabeth Sandiford and their marriage of 11 jun 1663 in Manchester, St Mary, St Denys and St George, Lancashire England.  All I started with was that George had died between 1669 and 1670. Elizabeth (Sandiford) Worthington was still living in 1669 and that they had been married about 1663. That hint took me to the IMAGE of that record.

FB2-Worthington_George-Marriage Image 1

 

Here they are on 11 June 1663

FB2-Worthington_George-Marriage Image 2

 

Never thought I would see these documents from England. Thank you Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com, Manchester, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1573-1812 (Cathedral) (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013), http://www.ancestry.com, Database online.

More on this project later.


Result of the use of WikiTree to gather information

April 9, 2013

I did a series of blog posts on the use of WikiTree to gather information from the “facebook” generation.

http://worthy2be.wordpress.com/tag/wiki-tree/

My goal was to gather family information about some nieces and nephews that I had lost contact with, so that I could generate a book and/or chart for my Aunt, my Dads younger sister.

What I had noticed, is that these nieces and nephews and their children were “online” on Facebook. So, how to gather their information for me to add to my genealogy database. Online … hmmmm … Oh yeah, there is WikiTree. http://www.wikitree.com/

I provided instructions to the upper right of my blog, on how I wanted “them” to use WikiTree, because I want that tree to be completely private as I was gathering information on living people, including a couple of babies.

Well, it worked. I had great help from a couple of cousins to pull this together and hope that I can get a couple of other cousins to help me fill out their “lines”.

I sent my data along to Family Chartmasters and my friend “the Chart Chick” Janet Hovorka, and the Family Chartmasters generated a beautiful Descendant Chart that I gave to my aunt. Now, when her great-grandchildren come to visit her, they can see that chart, find their name then listen to my Aunt tell her stories. And she has a bunch of great stories.

Item for my ToDo list: Take my digital recorder with me the next time I go to visit.

Here is that chart:

IMG_8301

IMG_8302


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