Planned Weekend Trip – Day 1

August 1, 2012

There is a “family reunion” this weekend in Darlington, Maryland. I have not been to this reunion before and don’t know what to expect.

We had planned to go to the National Battlefield at Monocacy, Maryland to attend the “Return of Special Orders 191” presentation and new exhibit. Not sure what to expect there either, but Civil War, Monocacy, why not go find out.

When the reunion information came out in a Newsletter that I receive and knowing this area of Maryland, it has become a weekend trip. Unlike some of the day trips that I have made in the past. But this one will be a “three for…”.

Between Monocacy and Darlington is another Worthington family location in Worthington Valley. I’ll post more about that location later. But the plan is to go to Monocacy, stay over night, go to church at Saint John’s Episcopal Church (Western Run) in Glyndon, then head to Darlington.

I have posted a number of items on this blog about Monocacy.

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I blogged about this a couple of weeks ago.

The Battle of Monocacy–148 Year Ago

In this battle, some orders were issue by Confederate General Robert E. Lee, but they were lost, but later found by a Union soldier. The event on Saturday is a special event and exhibit at the Battlefield.

More information can be found here:

http://www.nps.gov/mono/parknews/return_so_191.htm

As mentioned before, part of this battle took place on the Worthington Farm.

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To help put this farm into my family tree, here is a descendant chart from my ancestor, Captain John Worthington (1650 – 1701) to the owners of the Worthington Farm.

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Because the chart may not be readable:

Descendants of Capt John and Sarah Howard Worthington
John Worthington, Jr 1689 – 1763
John Worthington III 1728 – 1790
James Worthington 1772 – 1854
John Henry H Worthington 1793 – 1858
John Thomas Worthington 1828 – 1905
Glenn Howard Worthington 1858 – 1934

The farm was owned by John Thomas Worthington. John Worthington, Jr, was the oldest son of Capt. John and Sarah.

Of note, if you have been following this blog, Howard shows up again, in the final entry above, Glenn Howard Worthington.

I had met the grandson of Glenn Howard Worthington a couple of times, include in 1999 when a hiking trail at the Worthington Farm was dedicated. He, David Reed, has since passed away.

Looking forward to this event and exhibit, and finding more about this important battle of the Civil War.


Parent’s 73 Anniversary

July 14, 2012

Wishing my parents a Happy 73rd Wedding Anniversary today, as they were married July 15, 1939.

Henry Russell Worthington Jr (1916-2006)

Louise Strode Worthington (1916-2010)

Married July 15, 1939

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A family photo taken on their 60th Anniversary.

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July 1999

Henry and Louise 071539

July 15, 1939

Mom and Dad - 1994

1994

 

Miss you lots!


The Battle of Monocacy–148 Year Ago

July 8, 2012

It’s called the Battle that Saved Washington.

July 7, 2012, the National Park Service celebrated the Battle of Monocacy that took place on July 9, 1864. It was to have been a two day event, but the temperature was in the 90’s, so they backed it off to one day. Monocacy is a couple of miles south of Frederick, Maryland.

So what was it like in 1864? Don’t know, as I haven’t found any temperature readings for that date and place, but there was much to be learned about this battle.

There were three farms along the Monocacy River, where this battle took place. One on the North side of the river, the Best Farm, Two on the South, the Thomas and Worthington Farms.

The Best Farm:

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The Thomas Farm:

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And the Worthington Farm:

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The owner of this farm was John Thomas Worthington (1826-1905) who is my 4th Cousin, 3 Times Removed. His ancestor was the oldest son of Capt. John Worthington (1650-1701), while my ancestor was the youngest son of Capt. John.

Judge Glenn Howard Worthington (1858-1934) was the son of John Thomas Worthington who wrote the book “The Battle that Saved Washington”.  It should be noted, that Judge Worthington was involved in creating this National Battlefield before his death in 1934.

The re-enactor’s for the day, were “in uniform”, as they may have been 148 years ago, and had a number of demonstrations to give a hint as to what the battle might have looked like.

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The story teller, gave us a hint into the life of the Confederate Army at the time of this battle.

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The above photography was demonstrating a Skirmish Line, as an advanced party ahead of the Confederate Army that was behind them.

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The Union story teller, walked us through “by the 9 count”, and what that was so important.

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The Union Army was demonstrating “by the 9 count” way of firing. Oh, did you know that 4 teeth and 2 fingers were required to be in the Army? We learned why.

The National Park Service provided information about the importance of this battle. This was the only battle that the Confederate Army won on Union Soil?

The Confederate Army was going to take Washington, DC. The Union Army was “out of place”, and were trying to get re-enforcements back to DC to fortify the city.

The Union Army was able to slow down the Confederate Army for “a day”, allowing those re-enforcements to get back into place.

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The heat of the day, watching the demonstration, helped put this battle into perspective, from the stories of this battle, at this place, 148 years ago.


War of 1812 (as lived in 2012)

July 1, 2012

As we remember the War of 1812, I took yesterday to “relive”, if you can do that, a piece of that war.

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I went to Boston for OpSail 2012 Boston. Little did I know that I would have a history lesson in that War. The history lesson was on board the Pride of Baltimore II.

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The Captain of the trip told the passengers of the role of this type of “ship” in the War of 1812. Although the Bride of Baltimore II was not part of that war, but vessels in the style of this ship WAS part of that war.

Was we sailed into Boston Harbor, we joined other sailing vessels in the Parade of Tall Ships.

Several of the Tall Ships are current training vessels for current navies around the world. One of while is ‘America’s Tall Ship”, the US Coast Guard Cutter Eagle.

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Traditional firing of the Canon was shared between vessels.

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But another “tradition” among “Ships of War” was that of the Fire Boat. The tradition of ships returning from War were greeted by Fire Boats. The USCGC Halfmoon (WHEC-378) had a welcome home on January 22, 1968.

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The Pride of Baltimore II, although not involved with any war, was greeted as a replica of a vessel that took part in the War of 1812.

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About ready for a Great Adventure

January 30, 2012

Clothes are packed, techie stuff gathered, emails and blog post caught up, now to try to get some sleep.

After staying home but watching all of the events, and blog posts from RootsTech 2011, I decided that I wasn’t going to miss the 2012 event. I signed up as soon as we were able to register. It’s almost an overwhelming event.

But, I have had a couple of warm up events. Wouldn’t have missed them either, but this is a “biggie” for me.

RootsTech

Why go to such an event?

I could answer that by saying “It’s in Utah”. That is true, but my granddaughters live there, does that count? So, this time tomorrow, I should be having dinner with them. Can’t wait.

Why THIS event, specifically? Three reasons, I think.

1) Genealogy

2) Technology

3) Meet Genea-Bloggers

Not necessarily in that order. Not that I am a Techis person, but I have my toys. Been in on some leading edge techie stuff over the years, but a place where Genealogy and Technology gather in one place, sounds like where I’d like to spend three days. Certainly from everything from last year, there was no way to miss it this year.

But the third item is the real reason for going. Over the past several years, I have met, talked to, read many blog posts from each of the Official List of Genea-Bloggers, and most of the 90+ Genea-Bloggers that will be there in their blog posts. I will NOT be able to connect Genea-Blogger to Blog, but I have checked, and I don’t think that I don’t follow any of the Bloggers that will be there.

Why Blog? Cousin Bait.

But, the Genea-Bloggers is a community of wonderful people. For example, a group gathers for Genea-Blogger Talk Radio on Friday nights. Who listens to Radio ??? It’s not the AM / FM / Stereo Radio, but a Talk show, none the less, Show Host Thomas MacEntee lines of topic specific shows each week for about an hour and a half. While we listen to the “radio” there is a very active Chat going on, while the show is progressing. A couple of shows, there have been over 100 people in the Chat Room.

It’s those folk, and the Bloggers that I am hoping to meet, hang out with, go to class with, but to Learn FROM.  As I understand it, Genea-Blogger Talk Radio will be Live from the Family History Center in SLC. Guess where I will be. But wait, isn’t that the opening of Season 3 of Who Do You Think You Are? What a better place to be, then at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

I have to say, that I have been there twice before. Totally overwhelmed by what is there. But this time, I will have follow and learn from others. I know I should have a goal for a visit to the FHL, but I don’t. I will have my research on my iPad, the ability to take notes, take pictures, just in case I find what I am not looking for.

Will post as I am able.


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